How competitive for masters. Watch

joste93
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 4 years ago
#1
Hey guys,

Im planning on doing a masters and the course that appeals to me the most is MSc Evolutionary and Comparative Psychology at St Andrews. I know how competitive the undergrad is and i was wandering if anyone could shed any light on the competitiveness for postgraduate places as they dont seem to publish any stats.

Im a psychology undergrad looking at 2:1/1st from a top 15 uni btw.

Thanks.
0
reply
jadys10
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#2
Report 4 years ago
#2
(Original post by joste93)
Hey guys,

Im planning on doing a masters and the course that appeals to me the most is MSc Evolutionary and Comparative Psychology at St Andrews. I know how competitive the undergrad is and i was wandering if anyone could shed any light on the competitiveness for postgraduate places as they dont seem to publish any stats.

Im a psychology undergrad looking at 2:1/1st from a top 15 uni btw.

Thanks.
It shouldn't be too competitive, because not as many people apply for masters at a different university compared to competition for undergrad degrees, especially for you since you also have really good grades.
0
reply
Okorange
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#3
Report 4 years ago
#3
(Original post by joste93)
Hey guys,

Im planning on doing a masters and the course that appeals to me the most is MSc Evolutionary and Comparative Psychology at St Andrews. I know how competitive the undergrad is and i was wandering if anyone could shed any light on the competitiveness for postgraduate places as they dont seem to publish any stats.

Im a psychology undergrad looking at 2:1/1st from a top 15 uni btw.

Thanks.
Masters as a whole is less competitive than undergrad. Of course it depends on the course. MSc in Finance is a very competitive degree for example because it often leads to jobs in banking. I think you have a very good chance though for St Andrews with a high upper 2nd or a first from a top 15 uni.
0
reply
The Champion.m4a
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#4
Report 4 years ago
#4
You should have a good chance.
0
reply
The Champion.m4a
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#5
Report 4 years ago
#5
(Original post by Okorange)
Masters as a whole is less competitive than undergrad. Of course it depends on the course. MSc in Finance is a very competitive degree for example because it often leads to jobs in banking. I think you have a very good chance though for St Andrews with a high upper 2nd or a first from a top 15 uni.
That master's degrees are a whole lot less competitive is just a myth. Overall speaking for all universities wherever in general maybe, but definitely not at top institutions. The acceptance rates at Oxbridge are only circa 2% higher for postgraduate studies, and on my MSc course a substantial portion already have gotten a master's degree somewhere (one from Cambridge), with one already with a PhD (from SOAS). But that's just the academic side of it, with postgraduate studies most people shine with their work experience, in academia or the real world.
0
reply
Okorange
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#6
Report 4 years ago
#6
(Original post by clh_hilary)
That master's degrees are a whole lot less competitive is just a myth. Overall speaking for all universities wherever in general maybe, but definitely not at top institutions. The acceptance rates at Oxbridge are only circa 2% higher for postgraduate studies, and on my MSc course a substantial portion already have gotten a master's degree somewhere (one from Cambridge), with one already with a PhD (from SOAS). But that's just the academic side of it, with postgraduate studies most people shine with their work experience, in academia or the real world.
The thing with masters is you can apply to both Oxford and Cambridge and because fewer people apply for masters than for undergrad it often is less competitive. Oxford and Cambridge are willing to accept those with a 2:1 for many of its masters programmes, this would scarcely happen for undergrad. I'm sure there are some masters courses harder than others, but people generally stay the same or go up a tier when applying for masters programmes.
0
reply
The Champion.m4a
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#7
Report 4 years ago
#7
(Original post by Okorange)
The thing with masters is you can apply to both Oxford and Cambridge and because fewer people apply for masters than for undergrad it often is less competitive. Oxford and Cambridge are willing to accept those with a 2:1 for many of its masters programmes, this would scarcely happen for undergrad. I'm sure there are some masters courses harder than others, but people generally stay the same or go up a tier when applying for masters programmes.
Oxbridge would reject people going for a second bachelor's degree with a 2:1 already in their first one? News to me.

What people seem to have forgotten is that most people who apply for postgraduate degrees very often already have gotten at least one degree and plenty of work experience, something sixth formers lack.

It's like saying it's less competitive to run for American presidency because there were only a few candidates than running for class monitor at primary school because ten schoolchildren wanted the position.
0
reply
Okorange
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#8
Report 4 years ago
#8
(Original post by clh_hilary)
Oxbridge would reject people going for a second bachelor's degree with a 2:1 already in their first one? News to me.

What people seem to have forgotten is that most people who apply for postgraduate degrees very often already have gotten at least one degree and plenty of work experience, something sixth formers lack.

It's like saying it's less competitive to run for American presidency because there were only a few candidates than running for class monitor at primary school because ten schoolchildren wanted the position.
I see your point but its still apparent to me that people seem to move up but not as often down for their masters.

I think its also because masters degrees are also a way for people to get into a higher tier school move to a new country (gives them some local credentials and time to get accustomed to the culture) or get into a specialized/different field. If you did your undergrad at a top uni, you are likely to get a job with that degree. If you did your undergrad at a less good uni, you are more likely to want to do a masters at a better uni to bolster your credentials.

The competition for masters is reduced becasue the students from the best unis tend to just get a job rather than do a masters. The truth is a lot of people do masters because they still haven't decided what they wanted to do or they can't find a job they like. Also, it is a way for universities to earn a bit more cash out of students and so requirements are usually less.
0
reply
The Champion.m4a
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#9
Report 4 years ago
#9
(Original post by Okorange)
I see your point but its still apparent to me that people seem to move up but not as often down for their masters.

I think its also because masters degrees are also a way for people to get into a higher tier school move to a new country (gives them some local credentials and time to get accustomed to the culture) or get into a specialized/different field. If you did your undergrad at a top uni, you are likely to get a job with that degree. If you did your undergrad at a less good uni, you are more likely to want to do a masters at a better uni to bolster your credentials.

The competition for masters is reduced becasue the students from the best unis tend to just get a job rather than do a masters. The truth is a lot of people do masters because they still haven't decided what they wanted to do or they can't find a job they like. Also, it is a way for universities to earn a bit more cash out of students and so requirements are usually less.
None of these is based on anything solid. If what you say is true, London Met shouldn't have much if any postgraduate students, and Oxbridge people would always be able to get back to Oxbridge (they don't).

The main point I'm saying is that you're comparing apples to oranges. There are more people running for class monitors than American president, but they are certainly two very different things. In the case of degrees, you cannot possibly say masters are less competitive than bachelors for the simple fact that most everybody who's going for a master's would already have a bachelor's somewhere. So the 'competitiveness' would be the competition into their bachelor's degree + the competition into their master's degree. The job argument is irrelevant - we are not talking only about graduands going into master's, but applicants in general. Most people don't do a master's degree right away - they do one somewhere down the line to progress. It is not that out of 100 graduands, 70 go for a job directly and thus masters are only contested among those 30 people; it is those 30 people + the people who already have gotten a job somewhere and want to go back to university. Also note that by your reasoning it's more competitive to get into a sixth form college than a university, for the simple fact that some sixth formers do end up not going for university.

You can of course say purely by numbers, it is more competitive at undergraduate level, but purely by numbers, it is more competitive to get into Manchester Metropolitan University than to University of Cambridge, and it is more competitive to be a prefect in a secondary school than to become the Prime Minister. It's fine if you want to argue that, but you'll have to be consistent. And of course the next time you see a secondary schooler failing to be selected to be a prefect you should encourage them to go for Prime Ministership instead.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Have you registered to vote?

Yes! (551)
37.84%
No - but I will (114)
7.83%
No - I don't want to (102)
7.01%
No - I can't vote (<18, not in UK, etc) (689)
47.32%

Watched Threads

View All