B725 - Last Friday in November Bill 2014 Watch

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Faland
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B725 - Last Friday in November Bill 2014, The Rt. Hon O133


Last Friday in November Bill 2014
An Act outlawing the idea of a “Black Friday".

BE IT ENACTED by The Queen's most Excellent Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Commons in this present Parliament assembled, in accordance with the provisions of the Parliament Acts 1911 and 1949, and by the authority of the same, as follows:-

1: Guidelines for Reductions on “Black Friday”
(1) “Black Friday” is defined as the day after the fourth Thursday in November.
(2) No promotion or special offer may run on this day that did not run on both the previous and following days.

2: Punishments
(1) Any company contravening this law will be fined double the difference between the price on “Black Friday” and the price on the previous day for each contravening good or service.

3: Commencement, Short Title and Extent
(1) This Act may be cited as the Last Friday in November Act 2014.
(2) This bill shall extend to the British Republic; and
(3) Shall come into force immediately.

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Life_peer
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Reasoning? (People being fools is not a good reason.)
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Saracen's Fez
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(Original post by Life_peer)
Reasoning? (People being fools is not a good reason.)
I suppose it has a point in the US where it's the day after Thanksgiving and marks the transition from that into Christmas, but until we start celebrating Thanksgiving here (which would be almost as hypocritical as celebrating Independence Day) then it's an unwelcome import.
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username456717
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Nay.

All this will do is cause the retailers to start the sale the day before.
That Bearded Man
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100% support this, except you need to more stringent. A number of businesses run black Friday over multiple days, thus this bill will just encourage them to prop it for Thursday and Saturday too. (Although maybe that's acceptable? I don't know)
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I will admit, this is a very tempting bill. Unfortunately, whilst the events on Friday did make me deplore the state of humanity, I don't think there's really a ground for this bill. I appreciate the sentiment though.
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Nay
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Saracen's Fez
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(Original post by That Bearded Man)
100% support this, except you need to more stringent. A number of businesses run black Friday over multiple days, thus this bill will just encourage them to prop it for Thursday and Saturday too. (Although maybe that's acceptable? I don't know)
I mean we could run it over a week, but that would in all likelihood (unfairly) penalise other unrelated offers.
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Rakas21
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This is one of the strangest ideas I've heard. Black Friday in the UK is not based on our love for a holiday, its based on retailers and marketing deciding its a good time of year to pump up consumption. This bill simply moves the date around. Additionally, why should consumers not get cheap deals that day of the week.

Its not thought through and I can only assume you dislike materialism in general and are happy for consumers to pay higher prices if it means the marketing department looses.
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Blue Meltwater
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Agree with Chlorophile that I completely support the sentiment but I'm not sure this is an area the government should intervene.
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(Original post by Rakas21)
This is one of the strangest ideas I've heard. Black Friday in the UK is not based on our love for a holiday, its based on retailers and marketing deciding its a good time of year to pump up consumption. This bill simply moves the date around. Additionally, why should consumers not get cheap deals that day of the week.

Its not thought through and I can only assume you dislike materialism in general and are happy for consumers to pay higher prices if it means the marketing department looses.
I don't see why they need to import a US tradition whose original root is in an anti-British celebration and then cause the madness that took place on Friday.

There's no reason why we can't have cheap offers over a longer period (which should deal with the crowds issue somewhat) or at a different time.
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That Bearded Man
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(Original post by O133)
I mean we could run it over a week, but that would in all likelihood (unfairly) penalise other unrelated offers.
What about banning the use of a % off if it more than 25%?

So if I want to sell something at 30% off, I can say it is reduced but not my how much. If people don't know it's 80% off they would be more likely to stay away from it.
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Green_Pink
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Nay, nay, nay. We cannot just go around pointing at everything we don't like and banning it. Black Friday isn't hurting anyone, the fact you'd rather not take part in it is no more justification for this than me saying we should ban Arsenal because I'm a Spurs fan.
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(Original post by That Bearded Man)
What about banning the use of a % off if it more than 25%?

So if I want to sell something at 30% off, I can say it is reduced but not my how much. If people don't know it's 80% off they would be more likely to stay away from it.
I'm not keen on the idea. It seems like a way to misguide the consumer and they should have every right to know by how much something has been reduced.
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That Bearded Man
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(Original post by O133)
I'm not keen on the idea. It seems like a way to misguide the consumer and they should have every right to know by how much something has been reduced.
Why? It doesn't even represent value, it's just marketing.
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Rakas21
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(Original post by O133)
I don't see why they need to import a US tradition whose original root is in an anti-British celebration and then cause the madness that took place on Friday.

There's no reason why we can't have cheap offers over a longer period (which should deal with the crowds issue somewhat) or at a different time.
I can understand that but no consumer cares about its origins.

If you say its over a longer period then its less of an event reducing the incentive for business to offer these deals.

It really all comes down to whether you want the average Joe to pay full price for his Childs new TV or whether you want them to be less impacted by the Christmas seasons spending.

Those scenes are a price worth paying for your struggling families spending less on luxuries.
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Rakas21
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(Original post by That Bearded Man)
What about banning the use of a % off if it more than 25%?

So if I want to sell something at 30% off, I can say it is reduced but not my how much. If people don't know it's 80% off they would be more likely to stay away from it.
Trading standards would have a field day.
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ukip72
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Oh good, more business bashing. ****ing communists.
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That Bearded Man
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(Original post by Rakas21)
Trading standards would have a field day.
Debatable, are you saying that by denying them the 80% off sticker, that that is "misinforming the public"

I fail to see a problem, sale prices are often manipulated ANYWAY, whereby the original price stayed for a day, then a sale that has lasted ever since. Look at DFS. It is not disadvantaging the public any more than what I have said.

Then again, I'm not an economist, so please elaborate.
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Rakas21
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(Original post by That Bearded Man)
Debatable, are you saying that by denying them the 80% off sticker, that that is "misinforming the public"

I fail to see a problem, sale prices are often manipulated ANYWAY, whereby the original price stayed for a day, then a sale that has lasted ever since. Look at DFS. It is not disadvantaging the public any more than what I have said.

Then again, I'm not an economist, so please elaborate.
The problem with your idea is that there's no way to prove your charging customers fairly rather than changing customer to customer. That's currently illegal, for trading standards they stick religiously to the rule that you sell at the ticket price, even if its a misprint.
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