Is it worth going to my GP? Eating Disorders. Watch

Anonymous #1
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I have suffered from an eating disorder for around 7 years (I'm 18 now), I'm apply for uni this year and my ed has effected my grades, and I'm worried it will at uni. I was thinking about going to my gp to see if they will give me a note/letter, which could be used to explain my low gcse grades, and if I'm correct, I could apply for DSA.
However, I'm worried my gp wont believe me, and my parents would find out.
Has anybody had any experience with this or any advice?
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lilixxx1000
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You should definitely go to your GP, they should keep your confidentiality. It's definitely a good idea for you to talk to someone about it, and they might be able to help you.
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Rock Fan
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I would least talk to someone close to you and someone who you can trust. As you are 18 now the Doctor should keep it as confidentiality.
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missalicejane
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My CAMHS therapist (reluctantly) wrote me a letter for 'exceptional circumstances) but the exam boards rejected it because they said ive been suffering long enough to learn how to cope. Crazy right? You wont loose anything by trying though x
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hellodave5
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(Original post by missalicejane)
My CAMHS therapist (reluctantly) wrote me a letter for 'exceptional circumstances) but the exam boards rejected it because they said ive been suffering long enough to learn how to cope. Crazy right? You wont loose anything by trying though x
What?? Depends what it is you're suffering from, I suppose. If you have a therapist then really it is clinically significant I assume. Appeal?
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Tiger Rag
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(Original post by missalicejane)
My CAMHS therapist (reluctantly) wrote me a letter for 'exceptional circumstances) but the exam boards rejected it because they said ive been suffering long enough to learn how to cope. Crazy right? You wont loose anything by trying though x
That's not for them to decide. You just have to prove (like you've done) that you have a medical condition which has affected your exams significantly.

Being able to cope doesn't mean that you won't have problems along the way.

Going back to the OP:
You can't get a letter backdated to your GCSEs when your GP wasn't aware of your situation.
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missalicejane
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(Original post by hellodave5)
What?? Depends what it is you're suffering from, I suppose. If you have a therapist then really it is clinically significant I assume. Appeal?
I had bulimia, so mentally I wasn't focused, but its also a big time consumer, it got worse the closer to exams I got (stress related) binging 2/3 times an evening can waste up to 3 hours, but they didnt think it was bad enough. I've left CAMHS now and im about 75% recovered, so not much I can do now, annoying but oh well.

Also I didnt put my mental health issues on my UCAS form, but depending on how well or unwell I am when I pick my firm and insurance choice I might contact them, If i relapse there is NO WAY I can have a shared bathroom aha x
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hellodave5
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(Original post by missalicejane)
I had bulimia, so mentally I wasn't focused, but its also a big time consumer, it got worse the closer to exams I got (stress related) binging 2/3 times an evening can waste up to 3 hours, but they didnt think it was bad enough. I've left CAMHS now and im about 75% recovered, so not much I can do now, annoying but oh well.

Also I didnt put my mental health issues on my UCAS form, but depending on how well or unwell I am when I pick my firm and insurance choice I might contact them, If i relapse there is NO WAY I can have a shared bathroom aha x
Believe in yourself
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doodle_333
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(Original post by missalicejane)
I had bulimia, so mentally I wasn't focused, but its also a big time consumer, it got worse the closer to exams I got (stress related) binging 2/3 times an evening can waste up to 3 hours, but they didnt think it was bad enough. I've left CAMHS now and im about 75% recovered, so not much I can do now, annoying but oh well.

Also I didnt put my mental health issues on my UCAS form, but depending on how well or unwell I am when I pick my firm and insurance choice I might contact them, If i relapse there is NO WAY I can have a shared bathroom aha x
I would contact your uni as soon as you've chosen even if you're doing well, the transition to uni can be tough and you wont be able to switch your accommodation after xmas if you relapse, obviously you shouldn't plan to relapse but it's worth knowing that you've got all the bases covered (I'm thinking self catered en suite bathroom)

also I can't believe your GP didn't think b/p 3x a night isn't 'bad enough' and didn't realise how much that would impact your exams? I know when I was really struggling with my ED it was so difficult to get any work done because of b/p episodes and even after your done you're just exhausted and your electrolytes are all out of whack...

OP: you wont get a note to explain your GCSEs now you're applying for uni, you can apply for exam concessions before your final A level exams which may increase your marks (but it's unlikely to be by more than a percent or two) and it's unlikely your uni will make much of a concession due to your health either, so make sure you apply based on what you're likely to acheive rather than what you could achieve in full health
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roflcakes1
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As people have said above, you can't really prove that you had an illness at the time of your GCSEs several years later if your doctor didn't know at that time. Also remember that many universities don't look too closely at your GCSE grades, and might only have a requirement for GCSE maths or English, for example. Obviously this depends on course/university, how bad your GCSE grades actually are, and you AS/A Level grades if you have them.

It's obviously worth going to see the doctor anyway because you can get DSA as you mentioned, and it might help you get extra support when you're actually at university if you need it. I would advise to concentrate on a diagnosis before worrying about DSA/exam advantages etc. Without wanting to sound cynical, sometimes GPs can be insensitive when it comes to mental health and it might work against you if it looks like you're getting a diagnosis for academic reasons. You can always change your university application or tell the university directly at a later date if you need to.
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