Turn on thread page Beta
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Nephilim)
    What's it about? :awesome:
    It's all based off a dream I had one night about people in a kind of afterlife, and it has all spawned from there, this is the second book in the series
    Offline

    17
    http://pjbwriter.wordpress.com/
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    Wordcount so far for the second book in the series - 70,841. I'm quite pleased with that :awesome:
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    Hi, all. I just found this thread, and, as a writer myself, thought I'd say hi...

    I've been writing pretty much forever, but nothing particularly good thus far. I'm currently working on my third novel (written about 62,000 words but I can see it topping 100,000) and my main current project is my second compilation of poetry, 'Memoirs of a Titan'. I'm about halfway through that as well currently, and was hoping for some feedback - here seemed an apt place to post it. Hope that's not overstepping.

    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...of%20a%20Titan
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I have started writing a blog about 3 weeks ago. if someone has a minute to spare do have a read and either praise or criticise (I need to develop somehow). Some blogs I have written are just silly and for entertainment purposes, but some are fairly deep and thought provoking. 23 entries so far

    http://clackblog.wordpress.com/
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Cue awkward, generic intro post...

    I used to enter short-story competitions a few years ago, then they dried up and I stopped writing. I've had a couple of novel ideas floating around in my head for a few years, but I have the constant feeling that they are cheesy and generic (or at least at heavy risk of becoming so) rather than being exciting and original ideas.

    I'm thinking of entering NaNoWriMo this year to get myself going, as I'll be on a year abroad, working 12 hours a week and having plenty of free time to dedicate. I don't want to simply write without planning, however, as I have the nagging feeling it would be a 'waste' of a good idea. Planning is so hard though! The only method that I have heard of to sort out ideas for a novel is the 'Snowflake Method' but I have no idea whether this is worth trying or not.

    So how does everyone here do it? Do you plan in detail beforehand, or do you simply have a rough idea, sit down to write and get to know your characters as you go?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Raducan)
    Cue awkward, generic intro post...

    I used to enter short-story competitions a few years ago, then they dried up and I stopped writing. I've had a couple of novel ideas floating around in my head for a few years, but I have the constant feeling that they are cheesy and generic (or at least at heavy risk of becoming so) rather than being exciting and original ideas.

    I'm thinking of entering NaNoWriMo this year to get myself going, as I'll be on a year abroad, working 12 hours a week and having plenty of free time to dedicate. I don't want to simply write without planning, however, as I have the nagging feeling it would be a 'waste' of a good idea. Planning is so hard though! The only method that I have heard of to sort out ideas for a novel is the 'Snowflake Method' but I have no idea whether this is worth trying or not.

    So how does everyone here do it? Do you plan in detail beforehand, or do you simply have a rough idea, sit down to write and get to know your characters as you go?
    I found getting started quite hard, abandoning any ideas I ever had. Then I was forced to write two chapters (7,000 words) for my dissertation, and suddenly I've got these great two intro chapters, have already written 1,200 words of my third chapter (only a day after submitting my dissertation!) and have ideas for the entire plot pretty much.

    The way i'm taking it at the moment is to write out each scene I think of then try to piece them together and fill in the gaps.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Ok so it's not writing exactly, but it is getting data across in an interesting way - http://www.carrentals.co.uk/blog/jam...fographic.html

    took me 2 weeks to make this infographic, would love some feedback guys
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    I finished the second book the other day, am desperate to make a start on the third one but I can't :sad:
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Raducan)
    Cue awkward, generic intro post...

    I used to enter short-story competitions a few years ago, then they dried up and I stopped writing. I've had a couple of novel ideas floating around in my head for a few years, but I have the constant feeling that they are cheesy and generic (or at least at heavy risk of becoming so) rather than being exciting and original ideas.

    I'm thinking of entering NaNoWriMo this year to get myself going, as I'll be on a year abroad, working 12 hours a week and having plenty of free time to dedicate. I don't want to simply write without planning, however, as I have the nagging feeling it would be a 'waste' of a good idea. Planning is so hard though! The only method that I have heard of to sort out ideas for a novel is the 'Snowflake Method' but I have no idea whether this is worth trying or not.

    So how does everyone here do it? Do you plan in detail beforehand, or do you simply have a rough idea, sit down to write and get to know your characters as you go?
    I sort of go with the flow for the first draft and then plan ravenously for the second. When I plan for the first draft I find that I begin to overanalyse and get so engrossed in the details I lose sight of the actual story.

    Most of the planning occurs during walks or whenever I'm travelling really. If you have the time you should try and daydreaming your novel out as if it were a film- I've tried to do this a lot of times and as a result I feel like I've managed to get a much clearer picture of my characters, how they act and stuff.

    And umm, introduction? I've been writing since I was six, although I never wrote seriously until about 3 years ago. I'm currently studying English + Creative Writing at university, casually attempting to improve my writing skills while dealing with horrible bouts of procrastination. :P
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Syclipse)
    I'm currently studying English + Creative Writing at university, casually attempting to improve my writing skills while dealing with horrible bouts of procrastination. :P
    I'm curious to know what one learns in a Creative Writing course, because I'm not sure if I want to do it or not
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I'd be in!

    <3 x
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Nephilim)
    I'm curious to know what one learns in a Creative Writing course, because I'm not sure if I want to do it or not
    It depends what you're looking for really. The workshops work brilliantly in my opinion, as when you read your work out you're going to receive a lot of feedback from all sorts of different angles which will make you consider your approach to writing in terms of style. And you get to look at other's work too, so you kind of get the gist of what constitutes a good and bad pieces of fiction. So, if you want to develop your writing style, go for a creative writing course, since you'll be encouraged to write in all different styles (prose, poetry, life writing, etc) and you'll also develop your own unique style which you can tinker with during and after the course.

    Sure, you can do all this without a creative writing course by posting your work here and on other writing forums and share it with friends and see what they think, but the workshops provide immediate feedback and if you receive the feedback, revise and then post it on here, your piece will improve a fair amount more.

    One of the more shaky bits are the portfolios which add to your degree- quite a lot of university chums think that the marking of portfolios is unfair since it's based off the tutor's opinion, and there's a good chance they might penalise you if your techniques aren't to their taste. However, from personal experience they haven't been too biased. If you've written a good story, they'll be able to spot it, and I've found that most of their criticism is fair enough. Don't let this detain you off the course though, the tutors are incredibly helpful and if you visit their office with a piece they'll probably oblige in having a look, even if you wrote if for fun and not for the course.

    Overall, it depends really. A creative writing course won't teach you to be creative, but your style will become a lot more sophisticated if you take it, and you'll meet all sorts of people with the same interests as you. You'll also be given all sorts of opportunities to take your writing elsewhere- right now there's a competition at my university where the winner gets £500 and the chance to have lunch with a London publisher, and I wouldn't have heard of it unless I went to university. It will cost a lot, sure, but you only live once, and the experience is surely worth it.

    Hope it helps
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Syclipse)
    It depends what you're looking for really. The workshops work brilliantly in my opinion, as when you read your work out you're going to receive a lot of feedback from all sorts of different angles which will make you consider your approach to writing in terms of style. And you get to look at other's work too, so you kind of get the gist of what constitutes a good and bad pieces of fiction. So, if you want to develop your writing style, go for a creative writing course, since you'll be encouraged to write in all different styles (prose, poetry, life writing, etc) and you'll also develop your own unique style which you can tinker with during and after the course.

    Sure, you can do all this without a creative writing course by posting your work here and on other writing forums and share it with friends and see what they think, but the workshops provide immediate feedback and if you receive the feedback, revise and then post it on here, your piece will improve a fair amount more.

    One of the more shaky bits are the portfolios which add to your degree- quite a lot of university chums think that the marking of portfolios is unfair since it's based off the tutor's opinion, and there's a good chance they might penalise you if your techniques aren't to their taste. However, from personal experience they haven't been too biased. If you've written a good story, they'll be able to spot it, and I've found that most of their criticism is fair enough. Don't let this detain you off the course though, the tutors are incredibly helpful and if you visit their office with a piece they'll probably oblige in having a look, even if you wrote if for fun and not for the course.

    Overall, it depends really. A creative writing course won't teach you to be creative, but your style will become a lot more sophisticated if you take it, and you'll meet all sorts of people with the same interests as you. You'll also be given all sorts of opportunities to take your writing elsewhere- right now there's a competition at my university where the winner gets £500 and the chance to have lunch with a London publisher, and I wouldn't have heard of it unless I went to university. It will cost a lot, sure, but you only live once, and the experience is surely worth it.

    Hope it helps
    Thankyou very much, I will definitely consider doing a CW course, even as one of my minors
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    A writers society what a wonderful idea, im currently in the midst of writing a teen novel. I think I've re-written the same introduction several times i am really staring into a nebulous abyss, a thousand ideas and none of the take form in a rational sequence. I am very conceptual to begin with so if you guys have any ideas don't be shy to reply.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    I'm taking CW as an elective at uni, so far we've done poetry (which I don't like to write), but I can't wait for us to start writing stories. I haven't decided whether I like it yet, I feel like it's making our work too similar? I might be mistaken, though...

    If it helps anyone who wants to do CW, here are our 'textbooks':

    Mary Oliver: A Poetry Handbook
    Strand & Boalard: The Making of a Poem
    Stephen King: On Writing (especially the "toolbox" part)
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Raducan)
    Cue awkward, generic intro post...

    I used to enter short-story competitions a few years ago, then they dried up and I stopped writing. I've had a couple of novel ideas floating around in my head for a few years, but I have the constant feeling that they are cheesy and generic (or at least at heavy risk of becoming so) rather than being exciting and original ideas.

    I'm thinking of entering NaNoWriMo this year to get myself going, as I'll be on a year abroad, working 12 hours a week and having plenty of free time to dedicate. I don't want to simply write without planning, however, as I have the nagging feeling it would be a 'waste' of a good idea. Planning is so hard though! The only method that I have heard of to sort out ideas for a novel is the 'Snowflake Method' but I have no idea whether this is worth trying or not.

    So how does everyone here do it? Do you plan in detail beforehand, or do you simply have a rough idea, sit down to write and get to know your characters as you go?
    its best to write down all your good ideas even if it be a single sentence that flows well and sound good to the ear, a turn of phrase or even a word you'd like to include. I don't think theres one single way of writing i know Nabokov wrote his novels in flash cards which he catalogued.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Shadowplay)
    I'm taking CW as an elective at uni, so far we've done poetry (which I don't like to write), but I can't wait for us to start writing stories. I haven't decided whether I like it yet, I feel like it's making our work too similar? I might be mistaken, though...

    If it helps anyone who wants to do CW, here are our 'textbooks':

    Mary Oliver: A Poetry Handbook
    Strand & Boalard: The Making of a Poem
    Stephen King: On Writing (especially the "toolbox" part)
    I opted for creative writing in Royal Holloway but i went somewhere else instead to do English lit & linguistics. What is it like is it a budding writers dream or is difficult?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Land-based mammal)
    I am very conceptual to begin with so if you guys have any ideas don't be shy to reply.
    Well, what type of story do you want to tell? Adventure, Tragedy, Romance? It's hard to give ideas if I don't know what style/genre you're gonna use :cool:
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Nephilim)
    Well, what type of story do you want to tell? Adventure, Tragedy, Romance? It's hard to give ideas if I don't know what style/genre you're gonna use :cool:
    Romance/drama I don't have the bare bones yet i like to write down snippets sentences here and there description, im good at descriptive digressions. My into tends to get tangential. I need help with the structure and plot.
 
 
 
Poll
Black Friday: Yay or Nay?
Useful resources

Quick link:

Unanswered creative corner threads

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.