Article: The Green Party has its say on TSR Watch

Queen Cersei
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As part of the Parliament Week activity, the community pulled together some questions to ask leading politicians in the run-up to the General Election.

Now it's time to hear what Natalie Bennett, Leader of the Green Party has to say...

http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/cont...eir-say-on-TSR
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German123
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Interesting.
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Hal.E.Lujah
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Whilst I agree with their assessment of tuition fees, surely it's irreparable now? You can't sign one generation off on a ton of debt and leave the next gen able to get free education.


The £10 per hour minimum wage stuff is actually quite disconcerting. If that's the min. wage, inflation would be massive. The living wage would increase to £20 per hour and we'd be in exactly the same position with a weaker currency. But worse, during that transition, dozens of local and small businesses would fold and vanish overnight being unable to make ends meet with staff demanding what you'd currently get for being a middle bracket pay.


NHS Stuff sounds reasonable and nice shout out to Prof. Pollock's NHS Reinstatement Bill.


The main problem with the Green Party then surfaces again, the absolute focus on climate change. We have a looming energy crisis, and stuff like recycling schemes exacerbate that. All the spiel about spending more on research sectors comes across very hollow and unrealistic when barely coming out of a financial recession. It's just a mish mash of priorities that leaves the discerning voter, who is the only voter likely to even look at the Green Party, feeling nervous about the party's ability to provide on promises, particularly with all evidence to the contrary in their current positions.



Always appreciate people reaching out to answer questions though so good stuff :hat2:
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Ahmed79
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Couldn't of said it better myself. - Hal.E.Lujah
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Chlorophile
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Finally a response that isn't a mish-mash of excuses and lies!
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Good bloke
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The case of Brighton City Council demonstrates how the Green Party's environmental ambitions aren't matched by its competence. This council has one of the worst records in recycling domestic waste in the whole of the country - it manages to recycle as little as 30% of domestic waste. Plenty of councils manage to be more than twice as effective and recycle 65%.
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CloudedSilver
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Having not voted before I'm having trouble deciding who I'd actually trust. With politicians dodging questions as if they were bullets, it's increasingly hard to gauge the ideological differences between parties and we're constantly fed false promises or told that the policies holding us back are actually for our benefit. This was an interesting interview, some good points raised and questions actually answered in a straight forward manner. I'm a bit apprehensive about the likelihood that the Green Party could deliver on some of those points, but the responses were still much preferable to those of some other parties. Food for thought
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sdotd
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Sorry but no tuition fees isn't feasible
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ChaoticButterfly
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(Original post by Hal.E.Lujah)

The £10 per hour minimum wage stuff is actually quite disconcerting. If that's the min. wage, inflation would be massive.
and we all know wage repression is good for the economy...

In the current set up wages are kept low, working poor often need government to step in to make sure they can live. Effectively the state subsidizes companies allowing them to maximize their profits. It's insane.

Also Australia has one the highest min wages and has recovered much better than most countries. Raising min wage also gives more money to those who spend. It is entirely false to assume the only economic outcome to raising the min wage is an entirely bad is utter rubbish and is just a lie spun by those who benefit from it.

Henry Ford (that well known leftist) paid his workers more since he knew they would then be able to afford his cars.

I say raisng the min wage to £10 is entirely sensible. It just falls outside the spectrum of acceptable opinion so by default it must be insane (That's how subtle propaganda and regulating how the public think works) but if you propose forcing unemployed to work for nothing (which is verging on slavery and causes even more wage repression) is just fine apparently as it is very acceptable to have a pathological urge to punish the poor and unemployed.
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ChaoticButterfly
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(Original post by sdotd)
Sorry but no tuition fees isn't feasible
Unless you are Germany.
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(Original post by ChaoticButterfly)
Henry Ford (that well known leftist) paid his workers more since he knew they would then be able to afford his cars.
That's a myth.

For his real reasons for doing what may in practice have reduced his overall wage bill, read http://blogs.telegraph.co.uk/finance...wage-campaign/
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sdotd
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(Original post by ChaoticButterfly)
Unless you are Germany.

exactly we are not germany
we have many different things different for Germany
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ChaoticButterfly
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(Original post by Good bloke)
That's a myth.

For his real reasons for doing what may in practice have reduced his overall wage bill, read http://blogs.telegraph.co.uk/finance...wage-campaign/
If that's true I still stand by my point!

It just means Ford was a short sighted greedy capitalist.
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(Original post by ChaoticButterfly)
If that's true I still stand by my point!

It just means Ford was a short sighted greedy capitalist.
All capitalists are greedy, by definition: they have capital and want more. If they didn't they wouldn't invest their capital in ventures that provide employment to others - and then where would we be? I don't see why you would call him short-sighted; he seems the opposite to me.

If we raise the minimum wage dramatically we will merely price our economy out of the world market and drive our customers to competitor countries. Germany manages to thrive by placing emphasis on high quality and, to some extent, gets around its inefficiency and uncompetitive prices by that mechanism. That may not last for ever, though, and Britain (in general, which is what is important in this discussion) isn't in a very good position to do the same since it has neither a reputation nor a history of producing high quality goods that command a premium.
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ChaoticButterfly
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Australian min wage is £10.79. They are doing just fine. In fact they have been doing better than us since 2007 (not that you can base that purely on the higher min wage, it's far too complicated).
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Hal.E.Lujah
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(Original post by ChaoticButterfly)
and we all know wage repression is good for the economy...

In the current set up wages are kept low, working poor often need government to step in to make sure they can live. Effectively the state subsidizes companies allowing them to maximize their profits. It's insane.

Also Australia has one the highest min wages and has recovered much better than most countries. Raising min wage also gives more money to those who spend. It is entirely false to assume the only economic outcome to raising the min wage is an entirely bad is utter rubbish and is just a lie spun by those who benefit from it.

Henry Ford (that well known leftist) paid his workers more since he knew they would then be able to afford his cars.

I say raisng the min wage to £10 is entirely sensible. It just falls outside the spectrum of acceptable opinion so by default it must be insane (That's how subtle propaganda and regulating how the public think works) but if you propose forcing unemployed to work for nothing (which is verging on slavery and causes even more wage repression) is just fine apparently as it is very unacceptable to have a pathological urge to punish the poor and unemployed.

Everything you've just said is evidence towards not having a massive minimum wage. :lol:

Let me reply later when I'm home, but a Min wage means everyone gets it. Ford would have to pay £15 ph to be paying his workers 'more'.

I agree with raising min wage, but to £10? It would just be crushing small business and feeding the economy back to big companies.
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SerLorasTyrell
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(Original post by sdotd)
Sorry but no tuition fees isn't feasible
Unless you're Scotland


Posted from TSR Mobile
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(Original post by ChaoticButterfly)
Australian min wage is £10.79. They are doing just fine. In fact they have been doing better than us since 2007 (not that you can base that purely on the higher min wage, it's far too complicated).
It is very dangerous to make assumptions about what would happen in the UK based on what has happened in Australia. There are massive structural difference in their economies and situations. For a start, Britain is exposed to, essentially uncontrolled, immigration, especially from its local area which has an enormous pool of unemployed people. Australia, by contrast, is relatively isolated and has almost complete control over immigration. They also differ enormously in their access to raw materials.
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ChaoticButterfly
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(Original post by Hal.E.Lujah)
Everything you've just said is evidence towards not having a massive minimum wage. :lol:
Why have a min wage at all then?
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ChaoticButterfly
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(Original post by Good bloke)
It is very dangerous to make assumptions about what would happen in the UK based on what has happened in Australia. There are massive structural difference in their economies and situations. For a start, Britain is exposed to, essentially uncontrolled, immigration, especially from its local area which has an enormous pool of unemployed people. Australia, by contrast, is relatively isolated and has almost complete control over immigration. They also differ enormously in their access to raw materials.
Yet if it was failing I am sure it would be sued of an example as why min wage is bad. Plus the point is higher min wage is not doomed to fail. That and I specifially siad you can't link causation and correlation in this case as it is very complicated. Yet you all seem to know with faith like conviction that raising the min wage would be bad in the UK, even though it is a complicated situation.
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