The use of a degree: MLitt Watch

linden7
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So I've applied and been accepted someplace, and still waiting for the rest of the applications to trickle in. Of course, during the long haul and the scholarship search (I'm an overseas student), you begin to think––will this degree even *get* you anywhere?

From the perspective of the UK, what does an MLitt even qualify a person for, precisely? Or is it the unofficial stepping stone toward the MPhil? Is it the technical, niche end of a master's, whereas the Master's can teach? Or....

....please educate the American with international-edu. language barrier.
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Klix88
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(Original post by linden7)
From the perspective of the UK, what does an MLitt even qualify a person for, precisely?
TBH, a Masters degree of any hue rarely qualifies you directly for anything. In the Humanities, it's usually necessary to have a Masters before you get a sniff at a PhD (although I'm sure there are exceptions). In my Humanities field, you need a Distinction at Masters level before you're even longlisted for PhD funding at some unis.

Or is it the unofficial stepping stone toward the MPhil?
As above, depending on your field, a Masters may be a prerequisite towards an MPhil/PhD.

Is it the technical, niche end of a master's, whereas the Master's can teach?
I don't believe there's that type of distinction between them. Certainly teaching duties are expected at every level of postgrad in the unis I've attended, as teaching experience is one of the benefits which are pushed to prospective postgrads. However there's rarely an equivalent to the formal US TA position. Most postgrad teaching in the UK tends to be more ad hoc.

....please educate the American with international-edu. language barrier.
i'm usually loathe to do this, but have you read the Wikipedia entry on the MLitt? They're a bit of an oddity as a qualification in the UK and their form/significance can depend on which you uni you attend and whether you'll be in Scotland or England.
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Master_of_Letters
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linden7
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(Original post by Klix88)
TBH, a Masters degree of any hue rarely qualifies you directly for anything. In the Humanities, it's usually necessary to have a Masters before you get a sniff at a PhD (although I'm sure there are exceptions). In my Humanities field, you need a Distinction at Masters level before you're even longlisted for PhD funding at some unis.


As above, depending on your field, a Masters may be a prerequisite towards an MPhil/PhD.


I don't believe there's that type of distinction between them. Certainly teaching duties are expected at every level of postgrad in the unis I've attended, as teaching experience is one of the benefits which are pushed to prospective postgrads. However there's rarely an equivalent to the formal US TA position. Most postgrad teaching in the UK tends to be more ad hoc.


i'm usually loathe to do this, but have you read the Wikipedia entry on the MLitt? They're a bit of an oddity as a qualification in the UK and their form/significance can depend on which you uni you attend and whether you'll be in Scotland or England.
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Master_of_Letters

I'm going to St Andrews in Scotland, School of English, so the initial MLitt. If I can, I'd like to pursue the MPhil, but Admissions said that students have to be approved by the upper echelons of academia before being accepted––a bit unlike the American system where you can apply directly to a PhD and the Masters follows suit, along with TA-ing.
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Tasha1986
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(Original post by linden7)
I'm going to St Andrews in Scotland, School of English, so the initial MLitt. If I can, I'd like to pursue the MPhil, but Admissions said that students have to be approved by the upper echelons of academia before being accepted––a bit unlike the American system where you can apply directly to a PhD and the Masters follows suit, along with TA-ing.
An MLitt at St Andrews is a regular one-year taught Master's degree. The reason for using that name is that at the 4 ancient universities in Scotland the undergraduate degree is called MA rather than BA.

MLitt: From September to the end of May you take taught classes, and then over the summer months you write a dissertation of (usually) 15,000 words.

The MPhil takes 2 years - the first includes the taught components of the MLitt, and the second consists of a research dissertation of up to 40,000 words. It is possible to enrol on the MLitt and upgrade to an MPhil, but you will need to produce a proper research proposal and have it approved by the faculty in order to do this.

It is not necessary to do an MPhil do a PhD. You can do an MLitt, and then apply for a PhD.
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The Champion.m4a
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Just a master's degree like any other basically.
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