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Theory vs programming watch

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    Atm I'm doing Computing AS level (and gonna carry on with it at least to Uni) and I'm doing great with the programming itself because it's fun and logical But tbh I'm terrible at the theory and computer architecture etc.

    How important is theory compared to theory for a career in programming? Of course I'm trying to do well in the theory as I'll need it for good grades (hoping for a russel group or Oxbridge if poss!) but practically how important is the theory? When I get into really complex programming will I need to know about all this stuff?

    Ta
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    (Original post by TillyP)
    Atm I'm doing Computing AS level (and gonna carry on with it at least to Uni) and I'm doing great with the programming itself because it's fun and logical But tbh I'm terrible at the theory and computer architecture etc.

    How important is theory compared to theory for a career in programming? Of course I'm trying to do well in the theory as I'll need it for good grades (hoping for a russel group or Oxbridge if poss!) but practically how important is the theory? When I get into really complex programming will I need to know about all this stuff?

    Ta
    The theory is only important up to university level. When you graduate and go out looking for work they want someone that can implement it as opposed to someone that can talk them to death with how a compiler works or with how the ALU register and the fetch-execute cycle works.

    Just keep going as you are and it is likely the theory will come naturally as you progress though the practicals and the course.
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    (Original post by Binary Freak)
    The theory is only important up to university level. When you graduate and go out looking for work they want someone that can implement it as opposed to someone that can talk them to death with how a compiler works or with how the ALU register and the fetch-execute cycle works.

    Just keep going as you are and it is likely the theory will come naturally as you progress though the practicals and the course.
    Okay, I thought as much. Thanks!!
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    (Original post by TillyP)
    Okay, I thought as much. Thanks!!
    Yeah. As for stuff like computer architecture that can be confusing especially if your teacher doesn't explain it well enough. Which is the problem with most teachers.. They don't explain it very well.
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    (Original post by Binary Freak)
    Yeah. As for stuff like computer architecture that can be confusing especially if your teacher doesn't explain it well enough. Which is the problem with most teachers.. They don't explain it very well.
    Yeah, I don't think my teacher is that great at explaining stuff but the internet is good at explaining stuff so that's good
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    (Original post by TillyP)
    Yeah, I don't think my teacher is that great at explaining stuff but the internet is good at explaining stuff so that's good
    Yeah the internet is pretty good. You should try Teach-ict
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    "Theory" is very broad, so it depends. Do you need to understand how your code works under the hood at an architectural and/or algorithmic/conceptual level? Yes, of course you do - you need a depth of understanding of your code and the platform it sits on in order to be a good programmer. Do you need to be able to write formal complexity analyses and express your software as a Turing machine? No, probably not.

    The important thing to remember is that "computer architecture" is not really theory - and that you certainly will need to understand. The specifics of what you need to understand and in how much depth depend on exactly what software you're writing.
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    (Original post by Binary Freak)
    Yeah the internet is pretty good. You should try Teach-ict
    Ooh okay, I will, thanks
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    (Original post by Planto)
    "Theory" is very broad, so it depends. Do you need to understand how your code works under the hood at an architectural and/or algorithmic/conceptual level? Yes, of course you do - you need a depth of understanding of your code and the platform it sits on in order to be a good programmer. Do you need to be able to write formal complexity analyses and express your software as a Turing machine? No, probably not.

    The important thing to remember is that "computer architecture" is not really theory - and that you certainly will need to understand. The specifics of what you need to understand and in how much depth depend on exactly what software you're writing.
    Thanks
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    Usually both are important.
    If you do both then only it's worth.
    Initially you have to make your base strong for that you have theory knowledge, then only you can do programming.
    In theory don't change, but the programming changes as the output. So do more hard work in programming.
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    It's vital to know your data structures + algorithms (otherwise you'll end up using a sorted-set where a hash-set is better ). Other theory is of lesser importance and depends on the specific job in question.
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    it depends what you want to do. if you want to be a real bad ass functional programmer you need good maths skills. if you just want to be a average programmer you need A level maths.
 
 
 
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