Turn on thread page Beta
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Hi guys, I currently want to become a doctor and have decided to do my undergraduate degree here, at a British university but I have been told that the money here for doctors is relatively low. And also there will be a lot more opportunities in USA. Is this true? If so, what are the procedures of moving to America with a British medical degree?
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    Hi @kev.pan I think kunta kinte is a really good character. But chutney is better.........care to join in


    Jokes apart..

    I don't know anything bot medicine...so yh...I wasted your time
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    Not necessarily true, its really difficult to go to the US. The US tends to excel with the latest and greatest specialties and technologies. Many will do a stint in the US in order to gain that international experience, experience the latest and greatest and bring it back here to the UK and it also makes them look better for consultant apps.

    I recommend first choosing a medical school with a strong pre-clinical curriculum, one that focuses on the basic sciences. Avoid schools that use a lot of PBL, American schools are almost entirely traditional lecture based courses with a few using a bit of PBL.

    The USMLE in particular the step 1 is a beast and requires a vast amount of pre-clinical knowledge that most british medical schools just don't cover. Going to a school that teaches you pre-clinical sciences well does make it easier to prepare and probably will result in a higher Step 1 USMLE score which is crucial for applications.

    If you do end up at a 5 year school, do an intercalated year, it will allow you an entire year of lighter course load so you can self study the USMLE step 1. Choose a research project that isn't as workload heavy as well.

    In your final year of medical school do clinical electives in the US. You'll need your Step 1 score for this and you'll also need to impress the attending physicians and get recommendations. Write your Step 2 CK in your final year this score will also be important.

    Finish F1 and 2 in the UK. Finish Step 3 during this time if you want an H1B visa which will make it easier for you to stay in the US permanently. The other option is the J1 visa which makes it easier to get a residency in the US (aka a training spot) but also kicks you out at the end of your training for 2 years.

    Take a year off perhaps since F2 ends after US residency starts.

    Apply to the US and hopefully get in for specialty training.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    That was really useful information, thanks. But, I am not sure about the procedures for applying to residencies in the US after med school here. I have heard that you have to apply through ERAS. So firstly, after completing my medical degree I have to pass the USMLE, then do I start applying through ERAS (much like UCAS here) for residencies?
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by kev.pan)
    That was really useful information, thanks. But, I am not sure about the procedures for applying to residencies in the US after med school here. I have heard that you have to apply through ERAS. So firstly, after completing my medical degree I have to pass the USMLE, then do I start applying through ERAS (much like UCAS here) for residencies?
    You go through ECFMG since you are an international graduate, but yeah its similar to UCAS. You'll apply get interviews then rank your choices (you don't need to rank all of them) and then the computer will decide where you go and you get no say once its decided. (of course they can't make you go, but you have no other choice in the system)
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    It's certainly true that American doctors are paid more than their British counterparts. But you also have to factor into account the fact that doctors in America have to deal with lawsuits a heck of a lot more than here in Britain- and that can be quite costly. It's also not consistent in America across specialities- so a cardiac surgeon makes far more than a paediatrician, for example.

    That said, British doctors earn much more than the vast majority of other professions in this country and have greater job security. It's true that doctors here don't have as good as access to the latest tech, but that depends on your speciality- a neurosurgeon has all the latest gadgets that a GP may not, for example.

    I'm not sure it's true there's more opportunities in America. Our foundation programme gives you a very broad taster of medicine, and in speciality training you may be covering a wide base (eg doing A&E, anaesthetics and ICU at the same time).
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    I think no matter what he'll be doing his foundation programme in the UK if only to get registered by the GMC.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    go to Australia or canada
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Okorange)
    You go through ECFMG since you are an international graduate, but yeah its similar to UCAS. You'll apply get interviews then rank your choices (you don't need to rank all of them) and then the computer will decide where you go and you get no say once its decided. (of course they can't make you go, but you have no other choice in the system)
    Oh right, thanks. I was just a bit confused about it, thanks for clearing it up.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by navarre)
    It's certainly true that American doctors are paid more than their British counterparts. But you also have to factor into account the fact that doctors in America have to deal with lawsuits a heck of a lot more than here in Britain- and that can be quite costly. It's also not consistent in America across specialities- so a cardiac surgeon makes far more than a paediatrician, for example.

    That said, British doctors earn much more than the vast majority of other professions in this country and have greater job security. It's true that doctors here don't have as good as access to the latest tech, but that depends on your speciality- a neurosurgeon has all the latest gadgets that a GP may not, for example.

    I'm not sure it's true there's more opportunities in America. Our foundation programme gives you a very broad taster of medicine, and in speciality training you may be covering a wide base (eg doing A&E, anaesthetics and ICU at the same time).
    That's true but I have heard that, on an average the pay is better in America than here in the UK. But of course, money isn't everything. I think I would like to get a feel of how it is like here as well.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by solarplexus)
    go to Australia or canada
    Is Canada just as hard to go to as America, after completing medicine here?
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by kev.pan)
    Is Canada just as hard to go to as America, after completing medicine here?
    For Canada you need to be either fully trained in the UK for a speciality and then you can do a fellowship in Canada for the specialists and somehow people end up staying. (I just see people stay but i don't know the exact rules, presumably Canada allows it) http://www.cardiologyfellowships.co....couver-canada/ This is a website as an example for cardiology but i'm sure it applies to other specialties as well.

    For the GPs you just apply and they'll take you.

    In both cases they will not take anyone still needing specialty training they will only take fully qualified physicians

    In the US they won't take fully trained physicians only those still needing training or those willing to re-do their training in the US. Its very different, if you want to go to the US you need to enter at the residency stage.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Okorange)
    For Canada you need to be either fully trained in the UK and then you can do a fellowship in Canada for the specialists and somehow people end up staying. (I just see people stay but i don't know the exact rules, presumably Canada allows it) http://www.cardiologyfellowships.co....couver-canada/ This is a website as an example for cardiology but i'm sure it applies to other specialties as well.

    For the GPs you just apply and they'll take you.

    In both cases they will not take anyone still needing specialty training they will only take fully qualified physicians

    In the US they won't take fully trained physicians only those still needing training or those willing to re-do their training in the US. Its very different, if you want to go to the US you need to enter at the residency stage.
    Thank you very much, that cleared up my confusion.
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
Updated: December 8, 2014

University open days

  • Southampton Solent University
    All faculties Undergraduate
    Sun, 18 Nov '18
  • University of Bradford
    All faculties Undergraduate
    Wed, 21 Nov '18
  • Buckinghamshire New University
    All Faculties Postgraduate
    Wed, 21 Nov '18
Poll
Black Friday: Yay or Nay?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.