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    Hello,
    I'm currently doing my GCSE's and I'm thinking about my A Level options. I want to do biology, chemistry (or psychology), French and IT. Im roughly at a B in chemistry GCSE and I would like to do either biology, biomedical sciences or microbiology in university after. Most universities require biology and another science and my best bet is Chemistry at AS. (physics and maths are not my cup of tea). I was just wondering if the jump is exaggerated or not and wondering if I will die in chemistry AS. I'm on the WJEC exam board. I don't have an obvious love for chemistry nor I dont find it as interesting as I used to (that could be down to the different teacher I have now)
    Forgot to mention that I am a natural hard worker and if I like it or not I will still work hard.
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    Let's just say I got an A* at GCSE and a U at AS....
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    (Original post by Strawberry68)
    Let's just say I got an A* at GCSE and a U at AS....
    Urmm.. Okay..
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    (Original post by Strawberry68)
    Let's just say I got an A* at GCSE and a U at AS....
    Whoa was it really that hard for you?
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    Don't listen to her.. Believe in yourself you can do it. I've known many people with a A* at GCSE and have aced the test at A-level you will do fine, it is a big jump but if you set your mind to it then you can do anything
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    For any A level you have to start revising from the very start of September to have a chance of getting an A grade at AS.
    Trust me, college will be very quick.You only have 4 months before you start revising for mocks in January.

    If you want to do Chemistry A level or any other sciences then I recommend getting at least an A at GCSE.
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    I started AS in September and so far it's not too bad but I've heard it will get harder
    If you stay on top of your homework/revision and make sure you understand each topic before moving on then you should be fine
    But I would recommend trying to aim for an A/A* in chemistry now since at AS it requires a good understanding of GCSE knowledge
    I do AQA not WJEC btw
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    (Original post by sarskinz)
    Whoa was it really that hard for you?
    My parents wouldn't let me drop it so I gave up and focused on my other subjects instead.
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    (Original post by TahmidGCSE)
    Don't listen to her.. Believe in yourself you can do it. I've known many people with a A* at GCSE and have aced the test at A-level you will do fine, it is a big jump but if you set your mind to it then you can do anything
    That's made me feel more confident, but I'm not at an A* standard at GCSE; roughly B or low A
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    (Original post by Strawberry68)
    Let's just say I got an A* at GCSE and a U at AS....
    Legend.
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    Honestly, the step up really isn't that bad at all. You'll be absolutely fine - best tip I have for you is to learn things as you go along. If you have a lesson where you cover some basic equation (a mathematical equation, like moles=mass/rfm), make sure you understand it & commit it to memory as soon as possible. Then you will be able to better understand future lessons & you'll be far better placed to make the most of them.

    Similarly, if you get given a bunch of organic reactions, get learning them. Don't wait until you've got loads to learn (although most courses only make you remember a very few), but learn them as you go along.

    Do those two things & you'll absolutely walk through it. I heard so many bad things about chemistry AS & A Level that I was really panicking, but when I got there it was barely harder than GCSE at AS Level, just lots more of it (there was a fair step up between AS and A Level for my Edexcel course, but again absolutely nothing unmanageable).

    I came out with ~98% in my A-Level exams simply by learning the little snippets of info as I went along, so you can too - go for it and good luck!
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    (Original post by WishIHadRevised)
    Legend.
    You can't deny
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    Apparently so.
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    (Original post by President Snow)
    Honestly, the step up really isn't that bad at all. You'll be absolutely fine - best tip I have for you is to learn things as you go along. If you have a lesson where you cover some basic equation (a mathematical equation, like moles=mass/rfm), make sure you understand it & commit it to memory as soon as possible. Then you will be able to better understand future lessons & you'll be far better placed to make the most of them.

    Similarly, if you get given a bunch of organic reactions, get learning them. Don't wait until you've got loads to learn (although most courses only make you remember a very few), but learn them as you go along.

    Do those two things & you'll absolutely walk through it. I heard so many bad things about chemistry AS & A Level that I was really panicking, but when I got there it was barely harder than GCSE at AS Level, just lots more of it (there was a fair step up between AS and A Level for my Edexcel course, but again absolutely nothing unmanageable).

    I came out with ~98% in my A-Level exams simply by learning the little snippets of info as I went along, so you can too - go for it and good luck!
    Thanks so much! I'll remember that tip, if I take it.
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    Hey, go for it!
    It is a jump nonetheless but it's what you would expect from the transition of GCSEs to A-levels; it's not impossible but it doesn't mean it's straight forward. I had the Edexcel exam board for my sciences in secondary school and a lot of the A-level content is regurgitating similar information but a little more advanced (A2 is of course harder but I'm currently in AS ), it's a natural process and as long as you enjoy the subject everything should come along fine. It also helps how you're hard working and that's a great quality to have
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    Is it hard? Yes. Is it doable? Yes. Everyone is unique just because x,y and z got a U doesn't mean you will. Chemistry does have alot of maths. The key is self teaching! The teachers wont do shizz for you. Its all in your hands. Fail to prepare then prepare to fail. Work hard and it'll hopefully pay off.
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    (Original post by Question28)
    Hey, go for it!
    It is a jump nonetheless but it's what you would expect from the transition of GCSEs to A-levels; it's not impossible but it doesn't mean it's straight forward. I had the Edexcel exam board for my sciences in secondary school and a lot of the A-level content is regurgitating similar information but a little more advanced (A2 is of course harder but I'm currently in AS ), it's a natural process and as long as you enjoy the subject everything should come along fine. It also helps how you're hard working and that's a great quality to have
    Thanks! It's soo tempting now. I wouldn't need the top grades, as long as it's a C or above.
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    (Original post by President Snow)
    Honestly, the step up really isn't that bad at all. You'll be absolutely fine - best tip I have for you is to learn things as you go along. If you have a lesson where you cover some basic equation (a mathematical equation, like moles=mass/rfm), make sure you understand it & commit it to memory as soon as possible. Then you will be able to better understand future lessons & you'll be far better placed to make the most of them.

    Similarly, if you get given a bunch of organic reactions, get learning them. Don't wait until you've got loads to learn (although most courses only make you remember a very few), but learn them as you go along.

    Do those two things & you'll absolutely walk through it. I heard so many bad things about chemistry AS & A Level that I was really panicking, but when I got there it was barely harder than GCSE at AS Level, just lots more of it (there was a fair step up between AS and A Level for my Edexcel course, but again absolutely nothing unmanageable).

    I came out with ~98% in my A-Level exams simply by learning the little snippets of info as I went along, so you can too - go for it and good luck!
    did you do wjec?
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    (Original post by sid321)
    Is it hard? Yes. Is it doable? Yes. Everyone is unique just because x,y and z got a U doesn't mean you will. Chemistry does have alot of maths. The key is self teaching! The teachers wont do shizz for you. Its all in your hands. Fail to prepare then prepare to fail. Work hard and it'll hopefully pay off.
    Does the fact that it's mostly self teaching a good or bad thing? I usually do better when people explain to me then I explain to someone else when understanding things.
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    (Original post by sid321)
    did you do wjec?
    No, Edexcel
 
 
 

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