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    Hello there, I am in some form of predicament where I believe that I do not quite fully understand the value of each of the degrees: BSc, BSc + MSc, MSci and MEng.

    Until recently researching about the differences between MSc and MSci, that and being very mislead and given poor advice, I am not worrying about the choices I have made/making.

    I have spoken to a few tutors of the college I am currently at and have been told that I was best to take the Computer Science MEng course at Manchester (obviously this was just an opinion). I have since researched into this and have found out that this isn't exactly seen as well (credit wise) as a BSc and then a further MSc.

    I have also seen courses that offer a Computer Science [MSci], which I believe is an undergraduate version of the BSc + MSc (postgraduate) but is still not seen as the same.

    Now here's where I am struggling:
    1. I wish to go to Manchester, but due to a lack of Maths A-Level I would be required to do a foundation year of maths (which up until now I didn't mind the thought of). Going down that route will require me to spend a total of five years to achieve a Computer Science [MEng] (1 year foundation + 4 years MEng) and be funded by student finance.
    2. I know I can get into Lancaster (requirement wise) without the A-Level maths and can complete the Computer Science [MSci] course in a total of four years and still be funded.
    3. I have read that it is much better to complete a BSc course and progress to the separate MSc course (postgraduate). By doing this I will be spending the same amount of time as the MSci but will have to pay for my fourth year (which, again isn't really an issue as such).

    I have been mainly focusing on all courses that offer the undergraduate masters, be it science or engineering, and I am currently in the mind of reconsidering and going towards the BSc courses to then go onto the MSc.

    As to what I wish to do after the four (or for the foundation, five) year course, I wish to study a PhD so a choice based upon that and from an employment perspective is what I am looking for.

    What do you guys know of the BSc, BSc + MSc, MSci and MEng?:confused:

    EDIT: For those who wish to know what I am currently studying, I am studying a Level 3 ICT Extended Diploma and am expected to have D*D*D* as an outcome.
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    (Original post by TayToe)
    Hello there, I am in some form of predicament where I believe that I do not quite fully understand the value of each of the degrees: BSc, BSc + MSc, MSci and MEng.

    Until recently researching about the differences between MSc and MSci, that and being very mislead and given poor advice, I am not worrying about the choices I have made/making.

    I have spoken to a few tutors of the college I am currently at and have been told that I was best to take the Computer Science MEng course at Manchester (obviously this was just an opinion). I have since researched into this and have found out that this isn't exactly seen as well (credit wise) as a BSc and then a further MSc.

    I have also seen courses that offer a Computer Science [MSci], which I believe is an undergraduate version of the BSc + MSc (postgraduate) but is still not seen as the same.

    Now here's where I am struggling:
    1. I wish to go to Manchester, but due to a lack of Maths A-Level I would be required to do a foundation year of maths (which up until now I didn't mind the thought of). Going down that route will require me to spend a total of five years to achieve a Computer Science [MEng] (1 year foundation + 4 years MEng) and be funded by student finance.
    2. I know I can get into Lancaster (requirement wise) without the A-Level maths and can complete the Computer Science [MSci] course in a total of four years and still be funded.
    3. I have read that it is much better to complete a BSc course and progress to the separate MSc course (postgraduate). By doing this I will be spending the same amount of time as the MSci but will have to pay for my fourth year (which, again isn't really an issue as such).

    I have been mainly focusing on all courses that offer the undergraduate masters, be it science or engineering, and I am currently in the mind of reconsidering and going towards the BSc courses to then go onto the MSc.

    As to what I wish to do after the four (or for the foundation, five) year course, I wish to study a PhD so a choice based upon that and from an employment perspective is what I am looking for.

    What do you guys know of the BSc, BSc + MSc, MSci and MEng?:confused:

    EDIT: For those who wish to know what I am currently studying, I am studying a Level 3 ICT Extended Diploma and am expected to have D*D*D* as an outcome.
    I'd advise you do it separately, go for the BSc, then progress to masters, the issue with your first option is that SFE (to my knowledge) will only fund up to a maximum of 5 years, which I suppose isn't an issue, but if you do fail a year then you're screwed for the integrated masters.

    You'll probably find that many places will also offer some funding towards the masters, so it won't be entirely self funded.
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    I am also curious what the difference between BSc and BEng is. I applied to Edinburgh and they offer both a BSc and a BEng. I looked at the course structure and they are identical. :confused:
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    I have been in the same dilemma a few months ago. MSc is better than MSci and MEng in most cases such as more opportunities abroad and more internationally recognized, but more expensive in turns of self funding. However, I've heard some uk employees treat MSci/MEng and MSc equally, but not in US.

    If you do a direct undergraduate master (MEng/MSci), you won't have to go through the application process to apply for MSc and most uni requires you to achieve a 2:1 minimum in your BSc if you want to do a MSc, while MSci/MEng once applied you won't need a 2:1. Anyway, there is a certain flexibility depending on which uni you are applying for. You might feel that MSci/MEng isn't for you, you might change it to BSc during the first year.
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    BSc then MSc gives you the option of a well deserved rest after the BSc if you need it. Funding is available now, so its no longer a problem - which was previously the reason why id suggest going integrated route. If you can skip the foundation year, and you feel competent currently, I would go for the uni with lesser requirements. Reputation isn't worth that much any more, certainly not an extra year - even if Manchester is a brilliant uni.
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    I'm a second year facing the dilemma of choosing between doing a Msc/Meng or doing a year in Industry.

    Its kind of late but not too late in terms of applying for placements and I'm not really able to find much time to apply for places as I'm revising and stuff.

    I was wondering, which would be a better choice, to do a year in Industry or to persue an Meng/MSc?
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    (Original post by mmoalin)
    I'm a second year facing the dilemma of choosing between doing a Msc/Meng or doing a year in Industry.

    Its kind of late but not too late in terms of applying for placements and I'm not really able to find much time to apply for places as I'm revising and stuff.

    I was wondering, which would be a better choice, to do a year in Industry or to persue an Meng/MSc?
    Personally, if you are the kind of student who will likely achieve a 1:1/2:1, then I suggest you to do MEng/MSc even if you miss the important work experience that employees are looking for.

    One of the reason behind this is that once you are graduated with a master, you are highly likely going to get a job which might pays you the double compared that of a year in Industry.

    On the other hand, if you are not the aforementioned type of student, then you should take it because a year in Industry will prepare you well for future jobs, nonetheless, this will doubtlessly nurture you and you will become more mature. This experience will further reassure you to work hard for your master, or vice-versa
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    (Original post by ChenZhan)
    Personally, if you are the kind of student who will likely achieve a 1:1/2:1, then I suggest you to do MEng/MSc even if you miss the important work experience that employees are looking for.

    One of the reason behind this is that once you are graduated with a master, you are highly likely going to get a job which might pays you the double compared that of a year in Industry.

    On the other hand, if you are not the aforementioned type of student, then you should take it because a year in Industry will prepare you well for future jobs, nonetheless, this will doubtlessly nurture you and you will become more mature. This experience will further reassure you to work hard for your master, or vice-versa
    Thanks dude, do agree with you. Thing is, I've been reading an article about this somewhere and it was basically saying that a masters won't make the individual a better programmer - as per say - it'd more be focused on research and the academia side of CS. Heard from an uncle of mine that it's good to do a masters especially if you want to specialise as well.

    I'll see how the year goes and I'll be applying for internships as long as they don't get in the way of my studying. Least favourite part of this is the psychometric tests they ask you to do though
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    Pfft. Come to Newcastle University and do an MComp.

    For arguments sake, just consider this a fully funded masters.

    Also, the Computer Science department is highly rated and the first year covers a Mathematics for Computing Science. The module covers most of the major topics from A-level, then builds into a Discrete Mathematics with a Theoretical focus. It's a very complete module which trumps other modules I've seen from friends in other Russell Group Universities.

    What's more, I wouldn't recommend a PhD. for an Engineering subject; you'd earn more money and demand a higher salary by going straight into work. By the time you've completed the PhD., your friend who got a first in their Bsc is already getting paid 28-38K and would be inline for a promotion to project management. Food for thought.
 
 
 
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