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Charabis
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I was at Uni for a couple of years before, 2011-2013 and have just decided to reapply for a different course at a different Uni.

It is to my understanding I can get a full loan again as I didn't obtain a qualification, although I'm not 100% sure.

I found this on nus.org.uk website:

If you didn’t complete your course for reasons other than compelling personal circumstances, the funding you can get for further study depends on where you get your funding:

  • England, Wales and Northern Ireland: you can get funding for the ordinary duration of your new course plus one year, but less any years of funded study you’ve undertaken already (partial years of previous study count as full years when calculating what you’re entitled to). For example, if you dropped out of your previous funded course after half a year, and your new course is three years long, you can apply for full funding for the whole three years of your new course (three years for the ordinary course duration, plus one year but minus a whole year for your previous study). If you get your funding in Northern Ireland from Student Finance NI, previous part-time study that didn’t lead to a qualification isn’t taken into account.


Although I'm not 100% sure on how recent that information is or whether it is accurate. When they say part-time, does that mean not a full time course or just part of a course you didn't finish? I did 2 years on a full time course and then quit, part way through a year.

If anyone else has applied for a 2nd loan or knows a little about it, please let me know!

If it means I cannot get full funding for my course, is there any other way I can apply for funding? Like through a different loan company? I can't afford to pay for my fees myself and my family cannot help either.
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Klix88
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The info you quote is correct. Unfortunately you would not qualify for full funding, even if you don't already have a degree.

Your remaining entitlement is based on how many years of previous uni education you've done. It is:

Number of years of your new degree course (minus) Number of years of previous uni study (plus) One year = Remaining years of full Student Finance entitlement

If you quit part way through your third year, that counts as a complete year for the purpose of the calculation.

If you start a three year full-time degree now, this gives you a calculation of 3-3+1=1 year of full SF entitlement remaining, which would be given in your third year. You would have to fund the first and second years of a new degree yourself, apart from a minimum Maintenance Loan.

There are no other loans available for undergrad study.

"Part time" means studying for a limited number of hours per week, not that you dropped out. The definition has no bearing on your situation.
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Charabis
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Ok, thanks for you advice.

If I study though the Open University for 2 years, can I transfer and complete my degree at a brick university with a loan for that year?

I was planning on doing that as it would be cheaper and I could study from home that way and also have a job at the same time.
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Klix88
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(Original post by Charabis)
Ok, thanks for you advice.

If I study though the Open University for 2 years, can I transfer and complete my degree at a brick university with a loan for that year?

I was planning on doing that as it would be cheaper and I could study from home that way and also have a job at the same time.
The problem with that, is that OU study is still counted as uni-level study and it just knocks another 2 years off your entitlement. Going into the third year elsewhere, the calculation would end up being 1-4+1=minus 2. It gets worse rather than better.

If you're going to do two years of an OU degree, it's worth considering just going for the whole thing.

And bear in mind that studying with the OU for a full year's credits in one year would mean full-time study, leaving very little time for a job. It might be better to take a more traditional OU route and take longer over the OU degree part-time so that you can fit a job around it.
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Charabis
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If I was going for an Open University degree though, I wouldn't be applying for a student loan, as I can afford to pay it myself.
Does that still work against me in getting a loan for a 3rd year elsewhere? (I'm just trying to work out what my options are. I would likely just stick with OU for all 3 years anyway)

Yes, it would be too much work to have a full time job along side a 3 year degree with the OU, however I was thinking more along the lines of summer internships of volunteer work in associated fields throughout the year. (Say a 2 week course type thing if it came up)

If I pay for the OU myself, can I still get 1 year loan in my 3rd year of study if I transfer from the OU to a brick university?
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Klix88
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(Original post by Charabis)
If I was going for an Open University degree though, I wouldn't be applying for a student loan, as I can afford to pay it myself.
Does that still work against me in getting a loan for a 3rd year elsewhere? (I'm just trying to work out what my options are. I would likely just stick with OU for all 3 years anyway)
Sadly the entitlement calculation is based on the number of years of previous uni-level study, and takes no account of the fact that you may have funded some of these yourself.

If I pay for the OU myself, can I still get 1 year loan in my 3rd year of study if I transfer from the OU to a brick university?
Unfortunately not. As above, the calculation doesn't care how previous years of study were funded, just that you've done them,
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Charabis
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Ow, that's a weird way to work it.
I originally went to university at 18 like most other people, as my school had the stance of 'you go to university or you've failed'.
When I got there, it wasn't for me. Wish I had taken a gap year first and found what I actually wanted to do in life first.
Oh well.

I'll do my undergraduate degree at the OU then and see where that takes me. I don't have any other options it seems for study. (I'm 21 with no savings and my parents can't afford £10k a year)

Do you know of any other options I have? (Not that I don't want to enroll in the OU, I think it looks great, I'm just weighing up what my options are before I commit to anything).
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Klix88
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I don't know of any other way of doing it I'm afraid.

I dropped out after the second year of my first attempt when I was 20. I went straight into work and got a mortgage shortly afterwards. With only 2 years of student funding entitlement left (my calculation was 3-2+1=2) it took me until my early 40s before I could save up enough to try again and fund most of my first year myself.

Having said that, I would always advise contacting SF NI direct and double-checking with them.
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Charabis
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Yeah, I think that is my only other option other then the Open University. It looks pretty good from what I have researched on it so far though.

Do you know of anyone who studied through it? Or how highly employers view a degree from there? (I don't want to get my hopes up and spend 3 years getting a degree from there that isn't recognized as highly as a degree from a brick university)
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Klix88
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Four of my friends started degrees at the OU. One dropped out because she changed her mind about what she wanted to do in the future. One is four years into a Maths degree. Another graduated last summer. The fourth is in his last year and has been told that he has a genuine shot at a PhD in a brick uni - he's going down the academic route.

I won't pretend that they've found it easy, but that's part of the value of an OU degree. Employers will recognise that you've had to make sacrifices to do it, and also that it proves you have excellent time management skills and self-motivation. I think an OU degree says much more about you as a person, than a degree from a brick uni. It gives you a qualification and a character reference all in one!
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Charabis
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Thanks Klix, that's good to hear that employers and institutions recognize their value. That was the 1 thing I was worried about.
I am most definitely committed to my education now, after having a gap year. While at school I just cruised along, doing well enough to get through and not get detention. (Ended up with ABB at A-level, with no revision)

I now have the desire to excel once more, like I did when I was younger. I hope that the OU will give me the means to prove myself.

Like you said, it definitely wont be easy. But then again, it wouldn't be worth much if it was easy!

I wish your friends the best of luck and you too if you haven't yet finished your degree either. (Or of course, congratulations if you have!)
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