_Dreamville_
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#1
As the title says.

Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
SkyT
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#2
Report 5 years ago
#2
The difference lies in the academic title, the first course is a Bachelor of arts the second one a Master of science.

The bachelor of arts is not that well respected like a bachelor of science and similarly, the master of arts is "lower ranking" than the master of science.

Generally, you will have to do your bachelor's degree first before you are able to enroll for your master's degree.
0
reply
_Dreamville_
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#3
(Original post by SkyT)
The difference lies in the academic title, the first course is a Bachelor of arts the second one a Master of science.

The bachelor of arts is not that well respected like a bachelor of science and similarly, the master of arts is "lower ranking" than the master of science.

Generally, you will have to do your bachelor's degree first before you are able to enroll for your master's degree.
So it's better to do a BSc compared to a BA?

Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
Edminzodo
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#4
Report 5 years ago
#4
A BA is less Mathematical based than an MSc. And of course, an MSc is a four year course.

Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
_Dreamville_
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#5
(Original post by Edminzodo)
A BA is less Mathematical based than an MSc. And of course, an MSc is a four year course.

Posted from TSR Mobile
Is one more respected than the other by employers?

Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
MagicNMedicine
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#6
Report 5 years ago
#6
At undergrad, the title of BA or BSc doesn't make any difference its just a convention of the university, eg Oxbridge will offer BAs, some of the newer universities will offer BScs, as for whether its more mathematical you have to look at the curriculum to see that. At some unis they offer two courses, a more structured mathematical one with compulsory maths and econometrics modules designed to prepare someone for masters, and a more general free module choice one, in which case they will often distinguish them by calling the one with compulsory mathematical options a BSc and the more free choice one a BA, but if a uiversity only offers one you can't tell the level of maths content by the title alone.

A Masters is much more technical and by nature mathematical than a bachelors degree in economics, a bachelors degree teaches you the core economic principles and how to think like an economist, a masters degree teaches you more advanced theories and how to carry out econometric research techniques.
0
reply
_Dreamville_
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#7
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#7
(Original post by MagicNMedicine)
At undergrad, the title of BA or BSc doesn't make any difference its just a convention of the university, eg Oxbridge will offer BAs, some of the newer universities will offer BScs, as for whether its more mathematical you have to look at the curriculum to see that. At some unis they offer two courses, a more structured mathematical one with compulsory maths and econometrics modules designed to prepare someone for masters, and a more general free module choice one, in which case they will often distinguish them by calling the one with compulsory mathematical options a BSc and the more free choice one a BA, but if a uiversity only offers one you can't tell the level of maths content by the title alone.

A Masters is much more technical and by nature mathematical than a bachelors degree in economics, a bachelors degree teaches you the core economic principles and how to think like an economist, a masters degree teaches you more advanced theories and how to carry out econometric research techniques.
Okay thank you!

Posted from TSR Mobile
0
reply
Classical Liberal
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#8
Report 5 years ago
#8
(Original post by ZSHNZ)
Is one more respected than the other by employers?

Posted from TSR Mobile
The vast majority of employers can't tell the difference, of even give a dam.

Although, if you wanted to go into academic economics, you are going to need the technical skills learnt in an Msc (and to get onto an Msc you'll probably need a Bsc - or a relatively technical undergrad course). You'll also need an Msc if you want to be a professional economist, such as somebody working for the GES or an economics consultancy - again because you'll need the technical skills (basically econometrics and advanced microeconomics) that you learn on an Msc.
0
reply
MagicNMedicine
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#9
Report 5 years ago
#9
(Original post by Classical Liberal)
You'll also need an Msc if you want to be a professional economist, such as somebody working for the GES or an economics consultancy - again because you'll need the technical skills (basically econometrics and advanced microeconomics) that you learn on an Msc.
You don't need an MSc to work in the GES, unless you want to work for the Dept for International Development, but you do usually get a salary enhancement if you have one.

For some consultancies you can get in without an MSc but generally you would need one in a consultancy largely because you need it for the research techniques.

The difference with the GES is it is about economics underpinning policy advice and they don't tend to do much primary research themselves, they don't really have the time/resource to do it so government contracts research out to external consultancies (ie they have to bid to win the contract and then deliver the work). This is why a lot of the government economic reports will say "a report produced by X consultancy on behalf of the Department for...."

The other reason a lot of that work gets contracted out is for purposes of independence, especially when it comes to evaluating the effectiveness of a government policy it's better that government contracts an external consultancy out to give an independent report on it, rather than saying their own policy worked great etc.
0
reply
Classical Liberal
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#10
Report 5 years ago
#10
(Original post by MagicNMedicine)
You don't need an MSc to work in the GES, unless you want to work for the Dept for International Development, but you do usually get a salary enhancement if you have one.
Yes, good point. Most of the people I know who have joined the GES are doing an Msc that the GES is paying for. Is this standard?
0
reply
MagicNMedicine
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#11
Report 5 years ago
#11
(Original post by Classical Liberal)
Yes, good point. Most of the people I know who have joined the GES are doing an Msc that the GES is paying for. Is this standard?
Depends on the department as it comes out of the department's budget.

The GES is quite supportive in terms of paying for MSc training for its economists as a lot of private firms do, but depending on the settlement at the next Spending Review who knows.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • Sheffield Hallam University
    Get into Teaching in South Yorkshire Undergraduate
    Wed, 26 Feb '20
  • The University of Law
    Solicitor Series: Assessing Trainee Skills – LPC, GDL and MA Law - London Moorgate campus Postgraduate
    Wed, 26 Feb '20
  • University of East Anglia
    PGCE Open day Postgraduate
    Sat, 29 Feb '20

People at uni: do initiations (like heavy drinking) put you off joining sports societies?

Yes (470)
66.67%
No (235)
33.33%

Watched Threads

View All