how to get a first class degree?

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sadgirl24/7
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please give me some advice
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Skill Twix
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By studying and working hard?(I suppose)
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FrostyLemon
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For assignments

1. Look at the brief, make sure you are ticking off every point they suggest. That's what they will mark against.

2. Critically analyse your own points, counter points, counter points for that, until you synthesise everything and come to a reserved evaluation. Unless, you have enough data/logic to come to a strong conclusion of course, but there will likely be someone in the university who will find something you've overlooked, so I would advise against.

3. Second guess what your marker's viewpoint is/find out. People like to have their own perspectives reinforced.

Exams

1. Revise, memorise, regurgitate, repeat, revise, memorise, regurgitate, repeat.
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Helloworld_95
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Depends on the subject, for engineering it's 1. Don't be an idiot 2. Work somewhat hard. For law it's 1. Be incredibly smart 2. Work until your nervous system breaks down from long term over stimulation.
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cdoyle
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(Original post by Helloworld_95)
Depends on the subject, for engineering it's 1. Don't be an idiot 2. Work somewhat hard. For law it's 1. Be incredibly smart 2. Work until your nervous system breaks down from long term over stimulation.
Sounds similar for chemistry pathways
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Helloworld_95
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(Original post by cdoyle)
Sounds similar for chemistry pathways
Yeah, while anecdotal I have a friend doing chemistry and another doing chemical engineering, they're both fairly similar intelligence but the one doing engineering is having a much easier time.
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Binary Freak
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(Original post by sadgirl24/7)
please give me some advice
Some good points have been raised by other people

But you should also have strong references whenever you're doing the second/third year, that is what most lecturers look at first, it is backing up what you've said and proving that you're correct, alongside the standard declaring that you've used external material. Some lecturers even have a habit of skipping straight to the references section to see how strong they are, also, actively avoid using non-academic websites for references, which means no smothering your references/bibliography section/table with BBC or Wikipedia websites.

If you do use Wikipedia check their sources, they're shown at the bottom of the page, and reference them accordingly.

As for note taking, for both exams and assignments, if your lecturer uploads the notes early enough, make sure you print them out ready for the lecture, make your notes on the slide or document, it'll make it much easier.

Often when students are note taking on a notepad/book they do have the incentive to actually copy the lecture notes, that's fine if they're restricted from students, but in most cases they aren't, so just expand on the notes as opposed to copying them out.

As for revision, well, that should be common sense by now, realistically if you attend all classes, do the revision where necessary and have a positive work ethic then there's really no excuse why you shouldn't achieve an A (First).
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Slowbro93
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For the sciences, an element of thinking creatively really does help when getting that first class
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emmalgale
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It really will depend on your subject! My degree was maths & physics based, so the only piece of extended writing I did was my dissertation.

I got a first in my Meteorology degree. I always worked hard on the assignments throughout the course as that was the easiest way to get good marks. We lost marks if we handed things in late, so I always made sure I got things in on time. With my assignments, it was mostly maths problems, so where possible I tried to work with other people on my course. We weren't copying each other, but talking through a complex problem often helped us come to a solution. For one of my modules, I had actually passed the module before the exam because of my good scores on the assignments, so it meant I could relax in the exam!

As for lectures, I tried to attend most of them, but I wasn't necessarily someone who went to every lecture. If I did miss a lecture, I would catch up using a classmate's notes so that I didn't miss anything important. To repay the favour, I would make sure I took good notes in the lectures I did go to so I could help anyone else that missed it. I made sure I kept up with writing good notes throughout, and filed them well which helped with revision later on.

When it came to revision, I tried not to leave it to the last minute, but I find that I can't revise too far ahead otherwise I forget everything. Using my notes, I would write flashcards to summarise my notes which I could then use for my revision. I found it much easier to find important things on those than having to flick through a big folder. Highlighting important bits on those also helped me.

I discovered at university that I am not someone who works best in silence, so I very rarely worked in the library. I actually work best with some form of background noise (i.e. listening to music or having the TV on in the background). If I have the TV on, I make sure it is something I am not going to be tempted to watch - something like a film or a TV series I have seen lots of times (like Friends) worked best with me! I also know that I don't work well late at night, so I did end up adjusting my schedule during exam and revision periods so that I was getting up at a decent time in the morning.

That is what worked for me, but everyone is different. At the end of the day, all you can do is your best. For most people, their first year doesn't count towards their final grade, so maybe use it as a test to see how YOU work best, and how much effort YOU need to put in to get the grade required. Remember that a first isn't the be-all and end-all of life. If you are damaging your health by working all hours under the sun, eating terribly, not exercising and not socialising, is it really worth it just to get a first?
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Wimbs
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(Original post by emmalgale)
It really will depend on your subject! My degree was maths & physics based, so the only piece of extended writing I did was my dissertation.

I got a first in my Meteorology degree. I always worked hard on the assignments throughout the course as that was the easiest way to get good marks. We lost marks if we handed things in late, so I always made sure I got things in on time. With my assignments, it was mostly maths problems, so where possible I tried to work with other people on my course. We weren't copying each other, but talking through a complex problem often helped us come to a solution. For one of my modules, I had actually passed the module before the exam because of my good scores on the assignments, so it meant I could relax in the exam!

As for lectures, I tried to attend most of them, but I wasn't necessarily someone who went to every lecture. If I did miss a lecture, I would catch up using a classmate's notes so that I didn't miss anything important. To repay the favour, I would make sure I took good notes in the lectures I did go to so I could help anyone else that missed it. I made sure I kept up with writing good notes throughout, and filed them well which helped with revision later on.

When it came to revision, I tried not to leave it to the last minute, but I find that I can't revise too far ahead otherwise I forget everything. Using my notes, I would write flashcards to summarise my notes which I could then use for my revision. I found it much easier to find important things on those than having to flick through a big folder. Highlighting important bits on those also helped me.

I discovered at university that I am not someone who works best in silence, so I very rarely worked in the library. I actually work best with some form of background noise (i.e. listening to music or having the TV on in the background). If I have the TV on, I make sure it is something I am not going to be tempted to watch - something like a film or a TV series I have seen lots of times (like Friends) worked best with me! I also know that I don't work well late at night, so I did end up adjusting my schedule during exam and revision periods so that I was getting up at a decent time in the morning.

That is what worked for me, but everyone is different. At the end of the day, all you can do is your best. For most people, their first year doesn't count towards their final grade, so maybe use it as a test to see how YOU work best, and how much effort YOU need to put in to get the grade required. Remember that a first isn't the be-all and end-all of life. If you are damaging your health by working all hours under the sun, eating terribly, not exercising and not socialising, is it really worth it just to get a first?
Emmalgale - Meteorology - Nominative Determinism there!
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LifeIsGood
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Any tips on how to get a first class mark on biology exams or exactly how to integrate further reading? (do you simply expand on the content using the extra reading material relevant to the question?)
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