Elections Unit 1.3 Edexcel

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StephSeal
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Can someone help me define Strong Government and Stable Government please?
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catholicgirl
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Strong government:
This term implies that a government is able to act decisively. They are unlikely to encounter excessive opposition which will hamper its progress. The government is usually able to introduce and implement its legislative programme through parliament without undue delay or obstruction. Strong government has recently been viewed as a major benefit to the FPTP system. For example, both Blair and Thatcher were considered to be leaders of strong government in that the measures they wanted were made into laws. Such as Blair’s introduction of university top up fees despite strong opposition from the other two parties.

Stable government:
This is a circumstance where the government of the day is unlikely to become disunited or even fall from power imminently. The government is strongly established and able or likely to continue as it is viewed as enduring or permanent. This implies that, once elected, a government will serve its full term of office of 5 years (Westminster parliament). Moreover, the functions of the government continue even if there are changes to the system. The electoral system of proportional representation may fail to create a stable government because it creates coalition governments which are unstable because they collapse easily due to the internal divisions that exist. Thus they are less likely to survive a full term in office.
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