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    Hi, I'm new here I'm planning to do animation next year, I won't be doing a foundation diploma unless it's integrated into the degree as I'll be 19 and student finance won't cover it. I'm going to apply to Hertfordshire (3D digital animation), Teesside (Computer Animation), UCA Rochester (CG arts and animation), Ravensbourne(animation) and Falmouth (digital animation).

    Herts has put out some of the best work I have ever seen so I would definitely make it my firm if I got an offer. I've heard Tees is good for animation also but I'm not keen on living in Middlesbourough. I don't know anything about the UCA course I just needed a 5th choice but If anyone is doing this course or knows anything about it I'd be grateful for the information. I know Ravensbourne is respected in the media industry but I don't know if it's a good place to learn animation specifically though the graduate films are fairly impressive. I picked Falmouth because It looks like a lovely place to live

    I'm not too worried about building a portfolio, drawing and painting is like breathing to me I'm just not sure what to include. I know unis expect alot of life drawing but I can't afford to join a class, besides it is too late to join the only class close enough. To make up for this I've been doing sketches of family members (although they are clothed it is still drawing from life.) Is digital painting neccessary? I have and can use photoshop but I prefer traditional methods of painting. Should I include work from my fine art alevel? I've heard people say that your portfolio should "tell a story" or be in a logical order but I'm not sure how to communicate that with my art. Generally I just see something I like then I draw it, most of my personal work is pretty random.

    Regarding 3D, I've been learning Maya for the past few weeks. I struggled to learn from free tutorials as most weren't designed for an absolute beginner. I bought "Learning Autodesk Maya 2009 Foundation" cheap from amazon marketplace, there's a 2011 version but it's basically the exact same book. It's helped me gain a basic understanding of the whole program rather than how to model a specific thing like most tutorials on the internet are designed to do. The book is split into project based tutorials which take you through the basics of building a scene, adding textures, modeling a character and animating it. Does anyone know if it's okay to include 3D work from tutorials in my portfolio? Also, what it the preferred file format for animations (at any of the unis I've mentioned, If anyone knows) ? Should I print out screen caps of models?

    Thanks in advance for any information
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    (Original post by Firepants)
    Hi, I'm new here I'm planning to do animation next year, I won't be doing a foundation diploma unless it's integrated into the degree as I'll be 19 and student finance won't cover it. I'm going to apply to Hertfordshire (3D digital animation), Teesside (Computer Animation), UCA Rochester (CG arts and animation), Ravensbourne(animation) and Falmouth (digital animation).

    Herts has put out some of the best work I have ever seen so I would definitely make it my firm if I got an offer. I've heard Tees is good for animation also but I'm not keen on living in Middlesbourough. I don't know anything about the UCA course I just needed a 5th choice but If anyone is doing this course or knows anything about it I'd be grateful for the information. I know Ravensbourne is respected in the media industry but I don't know if it's a good place to learn animation specifically though the graduate films are fairly impressive. I picked Falmouth because It looks like a lovely place to live

    I'm not too worried about building a portfolio, drawing and painting is like breathing to me I'm just not sure what to include. I know unis expect alot of life drawing but I can't afford to join a class, besides it is too late to join the only class close enough. To make up for this I've been doing sketches of family members (although they are clothed it is still drawing from life.) Is digital painting neccessary? I have and can use photoshop but I prefer traditional methods of painting. Should I include work from my fine art alevel? I've heard people say that your portfolio should "tell a story" or be in a logical order but I'm not sure how to communicate that with my art. Generally I just see something I like then I draw it, most of my personal work is pretty random.

    Regarding 3D, I've been learning Maya for the past few weeks. I struggled to learn from free tutorials as most weren't designed for an absolute beginner. I bought "Learning Autodesk Maya 2009 Foundation" cheap from amazon marketplace, there's a 2011 version but it's basically the exact same book. It's helped me gain a basic understanding of the whole program rather than how to model a specific thing like most tutorials on the internet are designed to do. The book is split into project based tutorials which take you through the basics of building a scene, adding textures, modeling a character and animating it. Does anyone know if it's okay to include 3D work from tutorials in my portfolio? Also, what it the preferred file format for animations (at any of the unis I've mentioned, If anyone knows) ? Should I print out screen caps of models?

    Thanks in advance for any information

    Hi,

    I'm on the BA (Hons) Computer Animation course at Teesside, and I've been living here 5 weeks now, and Middlesbrough isn't as bad as I thought it would be. It's actually really clean, and a few of the locals look slightly dodgy, but in general everyone's friendly here, plus there is a lot of grass on campus so it feels less industrial. It's also so convenient being right in town, so in between lectures you can go home or pop into town with some friends and be back to a lecture within 3 minutes walk.

    So don't let Middlesbrough put you off applying to Teesside.
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    (Original post by Firepants)
    Hi, I'm new here I'm planning to do animation next year, I won't be doing a foundation diploma unless it's integrated into the degree as I'll be 19 and student finance won't cover it. I'm going to apply to Hertfordshire (3D digital animation), Teesside (Computer Animation), UCA Rochester (CG arts and animation), Ravensbourne(animation) and Falmouth (digital animation).

    Herts has put out some of the best work I have ever seen so I would definitely make it my firm if I got an offer. I've heard Tees is good for animation also but I'm not keen on living in Middlesbourough. I don't know anything about the UCA course I just needed a 5th choice but If anyone is doing this course or knows anything about it I'd be grateful for the information. I know Ravensbourne is respected in the media industry but I don't know if it's a good place to learn animation specifically though the graduate films are fairly impressive. I picked Falmouth because It looks like a lovely place to live

    I'm not too worried about building a portfolio, drawing and painting is like breathing to me I'm just not sure what to include. I know unis expect alot of life drawing but I can't afford to join a class, besides it is too late to join the only class close enough. To make up for this I've been doing sketches of family members (although they are clothed it is still drawing from life.) Is digital painting neccessary? I have and can use photoshop but I prefer traditional methods of painting. Should I include work from my fine art alevel? I've heard people say that your portfolio should "tell a story" or be in a logical order but I'm not sure how to communicate that with my art. Generally I just see something I like then I draw it, most of my personal work is pretty random.

    Regarding 3D, I've been learning Maya for the past few weeks. I struggled to learn from free tutorials as most weren't designed for an absolute beginner. I bought "Learning Autodesk Maya 2009 Foundation" cheap from amazon marketplace, there's a 2011 version but it's basically the exact same book. It's helped me gain a basic understanding of the whole program rather than how to model a specific thing like most tutorials on the internet are designed to do. The book is split into project based tutorials which take you through the basics of building a scene, adding textures, modeling a character and animating it. Does anyone know if it's okay to include 3D work from tutorials in my portfolio? Also, what it the preferred file format for animations (at any of the unis I've mentioned, If anyone knows) ? Should I print out screen caps of models?

    Thanks in advance for any information

    I'll add some advice below about the portfolio, but first of all I can strongly recommend that any of you applying this year should visit all the open days at all the universities you are considering. You probably already have a strong idea of which course(s) you wish to attend as long as you get the grades you need, but do think about backup plans - if you don't get the grades and you wish to attend an animation course next year, make sure you have visited your insurance choices so that you know that it is worth your while attending them (and most of all, paying back the money for the rest of your career). I wouldn't take a chance if you don't get in to your first choice - make sure you know that you also don't mind attending and repaying on your second choice too. If you don't get the A-level / BTEC grades you want, before just accepting the insurance, think - is it worth more to me to attend a one year foundation course, get the huge amount of extra UCAS points from it and therefore guarantee that you have the grades for the year after (OK you've had to pay for a 1 year course on top in some cases)

    or

    Just take your insurance offer and perhaps spend the next 30 years regretting paying it off...

    You're being asked to make a decision which will affect you financially for the rest of your life - it's the sort of decision that most people make when they get a mortgage, but that is something that the majority of you will do at a much later point in life when your careers are already in place - it's rare that anyone at the age of 18 would need to make this decision. especially when you have no previous experience of what this will do to you in future.

    Anyway back to answering Firepants. Thanks for the compliments

    I'd strongly advise joining a life drawing class or we are unlikely to accept you. Life drawing does not have to be expensive though, join the http://london-life-drawing-society.ning.com/ and you should be able to find your local group and most are very reasonable. Sketches of family members can be god (if done well enough) but we need to know whether you really understand anatomy, and you're only going to get that with life drawing. Digital painting is something we like, but not essential - as long as you have traditional painting skills that will be fine (we'll teach the digital painting). You should have images that show knowledge of perspective (two point or higher), colour theory and composition. I don't care what you draw/paint them in, as long as you are demonstrating those skills. Yes you can include work from your A-level as long as it's good If you are having to do nothing but copy Salvador Dali or Monet, well don't bother putting that in, or at the other end, if you are having to make a load of conceptual crap, leave that out as well. Look at the work and ask yourself - does this show talent? does this show ability to record the world outside yourself (or inside if it comes to that), does it show technical skill and creative design? Don't worry about a portfolio telling a story - although that is a good piece of advice if you are applying for a fine art course. Having images, each one that tells a story is a damn good idea, especially when making concepts for characters or environments. But we wouldn't expect that to extend through an entire portfolio.

    Regarding 3D yes we want to see it, we prefer to see work you've made yourself rather than tutorials because most (decent) tutorials also come with the files so we don't know if you just used those, plus it shows zero creativity on your part - and you do want to demonstrate creativity or there's no point in becoming an animator Screen captures of models are great. Show them from different angles.

    I don't know what other universities will want, but a MOV with h264 codec or MP4 file are the industry standards for compressed file delivery and that's what we like too Don't forget to compress the sound as well - ALaw or IMA 4:1 are good audio codecs.

    Hope that helps
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    Hey, I have been reading through this thread although I skipped to the last page after a while...

    I think that this is possible but I'm unsure and want to ask and hopefully won't get ripped apart for it.

    I know it must be possible but how likely is it that someone can get into a Uni with poor GCSE results and no A levels? If my portfolio was pretty dam good then surely I could stand a chance of getting in to a university for 3d Animation?

    I took all of my GCSE's and failed one, I got a B for one subject and the rest were C or lower which I know is poor but at the time I was between schools and being an idiot which I severely regret now.

    I personally think that I could put together a pretty dam good Portfolio / Demo Reel of my Animation skills as that is what I want to do, I'm confident in my skill so far and I have been teaching myself up until now, which I have had a lot of luck with because I can animate and rig pretty well now (also with some help from Digital Tutors for the rigging training, I have had a couple of monthly subscriptions with them) but I know there is much I could learn and great techniques I could pick up on not to mention the contacts I could make through going to a University to better learn the trade which is something that I really want to do. However I would probably only get in based off of my Portfolio.

    Would it be worth applying if I will be strongly relying on my demo reel?

    My Portfolio will contain things like character designs and 2d sketches of the characters with some 3d models, but mostly it will contain my Animations which I will be putting together real soon because I have recently lost a lot of my work but I feel that I could get enough done to present when applying but I would like to get some feedback on my situation from anyone that will give some advice?

    I would like to say one last thing, I'm generally good at art although my art skills could use some fine tuning. I've recently got into digitalizing my art in Photoshop with a graphics tablet and I'm loving it, but I have mainly been concentrating on my animation skills as like I have said this is what I want to do. I have also taken time to learn to model 3d characters to better my understanding on rigging them to further my animation skills and I fully understand topology and how it should flow but I am not the greatest 3d artist around. The work should however be good enough to present in my opinion.


    Please, any feedback will be appreciated and I registered to this forum like a few others just to reply to this thread but I will most likely have a look around at some of the other ones now that I'm here!
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    (Original post by Killie)
    Hey, I have been reading through this thread although I skipped to the last page after a while...

    I think that this is possible but I'm unsure and want to ask and hopefully won't get ripped apart for it.

    I know it must be possible but how likely is it that someone can get into a Uni with poor GCSE results and no A levels? If my portfolio was pretty dam good then surely I could stand a chance of getting in to a university for 3d Animation?

    I took all of my GCSE's and failed one, I got a B for one subject and the rest were C or lower which I know is poor but at the time I was between schools and being an idiot which I severely regret now.

    I personally think that I could put together a pretty dam good Portfolio / Demo Reel of my Animation skills as that is what I want to do, I'm confident in my skill so far and I have been teaching myself up until now, which I have had a lot of luck with because I can animate and rig pretty well now (also with some help from Digital Tutors for the rigging training, I have had a couple of monthly subscriptions with them) but I know there is much I could learn and great techniques I could pick up on not to mention the contacts I could make through going to a University to better learn the trade which is something that I really want to do. However I would probably only get in based off of my Portfolio.

    Would it be worth applying if I will be strongly relying on my demo reel?

    My Portfolio will contain things like character designs and 2d sketches of the characters with some 3d models, but mostly it will contain my Animations which I will be putting together real soon because I have recently lost a lot of my work but I feel that I could get enough done to present when applying but I would like to get some feedback on my situation from anyone that will give some advice?

    I would like to say one last thing, I'm generally good at art although my art skills could use some fine tuning. I've recently got into digitalizing my art in Photoshop with a graphics tablet and I'm loving it, but I have mainly been concentrating on my animation skills as like I have said this is what I want to do. I have also taken time to learn to model 3d characters to better my understanding on rigging them to further my animation skills and I fully understand topology and how it should flow but I am not the greatest 3d artist around. The work should however be good enough to present in my opinion.


    Please, any feedback will be appreciated and I registered to this forum like a few others just to reply to this thread but I will most likely have a look around at some of the other ones now that I'm here!
    I can only speak for Herts, but as far as I'm aware, it would be impossible. This is because the higher ups of the University specify strict UCAS points requirements, that MUST be met by every candidate, before the opinions and decisions of the animation department based off your portfolio are even considered.

    I also believe UH Animation degrees require you to have at least a C in GCSE English. I'm not sure what the best course of action for you would be, but 'm sure Moid will be along shortly to offer you suggestions, and/or correct my knowledge of the Herts admission system.
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    Well, thank you ColonelMoore for your reply and I hope that someone could help me figure out what I can do, I'm unsure on this whole situation but I would love to go to University and study for Animation.

    I believe I have a C in English but I'm not too sure. I need to go and find my results =|

    I'm hoping that there is some way or if someone could suggest what my next course of action could be. I would greatly appreciate that. I will be looking for my GCSE results to double check my grades.
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    Perhaps my best bet would be to carry on doing freelance work and then build a real big portfolio, then apply for a job as an animator once I have more experience and such (2 or so years down the line) instead of trying to apply to a uni if what Colonel said was correct....

    Or even go and do my A levels. Any thoughts or opinions on what you think I should do?


    Thanks to anyone that replies. =]
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    (Original post by Killie)
    Hey, I have been reading through this thread although I skipped to the last page after a while...

    I think that this is possible but I'm unsure and want to ask and hopefully won't get ripped apart for it.

    I know it must be possible but how likely is it that someone can get into a Uni with poor GCSE results and no A levels? If my portfolio was pretty dam good then surely I could stand a chance of getting in to a university for 3d Animation?

    I took all of my GCSE's and failed one, I got a B for one subject and the rest were C or lower which I know is poor but at the time I was between schools and being an idiot which I severely regret now.

    I personally think that I could put together a pretty dam good Portfolio / Demo Reel of my Animation skills as that is what I want to do, I'm confident in my skill so far and I have been teaching myself up until now, which I have had a lot of luck with because I can animate and rig pretty well now (also with some help from Digital Tutors for the rigging training, I have had a couple of monthly subscriptions with them) but I know there is much I could learn and great techniques I could pick up on not to mention the contacts I could make through going to a University to better learn the trade which is something that I really want to do. However I would probably only get in based off of my Portfolio.

    Would it be worth applying if I will be strongly relying on my demo reel?

    My Portfolio will contain things like character designs and 2d sketches of the characters with some 3d models, but mostly it will contain my Animations which I will be putting together real soon because I have recently lost a lot of my work but I feel that I could get enough done to present when applying but I would like to get some feedback on my situation from anyone that will give some advice?

    I would like to say one last thing, I'm generally good at art although my art skills could use some fine tuning. I've recently got into digitalizing my art in Photoshop with a graphics tablet and I'm loving it, but I have mainly been concentrating on my animation skills as like I have said this is what I want to do. I have also taken time to learn to model 3d characters to better my understanding on rigging them to further my animation skills and I fully understand topology and how it should flow but I am not the greatest 3d artist around. The work should however be good enough to present in my opinion.


    Please, any feedback will be appreciated and I registered to this forum like a few others just to reply to this thread but I will most likely have a look around at some of the other ones now that I'm here!
    Hmmm this is a tricky one - would you be old enough to be considered to be a mature student / mature applicant? If so you could study an Access Diploma in HE at a college, and on successful completion of it you would theoretically be able to apply to Hertfordshire - you may (depending on the contents of the Access course) also have to take GCSE Maths / English or their FE level equivalents. We don't run Access courses at UH ( as far as I am aware), so you would need to contact your local college to find out if they run the course.

    A GCSE grade of C+ is considered a good pass by the way. We only need you to have English and Maths (we don't mind about the rest).

    We would want to see the portfolio as well as the Access qualification, and yes your portfolio would be the thing that would get you in (it will have to be good), but you also have to have the qualification or you won't get interviewed. If you want some feedback on your portfolio, put it online and send me a link.
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    (Original post by ColonelMoore)
    I can only speak for Herts, but as far as I'm aware, it would be impossible. This is because the higher ups of the University specify strict UCAS points requirements, that MUST be met by every candidate, before the opinions and decisions of the animation department based off your portfolio are even considered.

    I also believe UH Animation degrees require you to have at least a C in GCSE English. I'm not sure what the best course of action for you would be, but 'm sure Moid will be along shortly to offer you suggestions, and/or correct my knowledge of the Herts admission system.
    Thanks ColonelMoore Those requirements (280 UCAS and GCSE Maths and English) are for the bulk of applicants (those coming from school / college) but many universities accept mature students under different entry requirements, because mature students are usually considered to be very dedicated in their study and bring a level of well, maturity, that 18 year olds don't always have
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    (Original post by Killie)
    Perhaps my best bet would be to carry on doing freelance work and then build a real big portfolio, then apply for a job as an animator once I have more experience and such (2 or so years down the line) instead of trying to apply to a uni if what Colonel said was correct....

    Or even go and do my A levels. Any thoughts or opinions on what you think I should do?


    Thanks to anyone that replies. =]
    Contrary to popular opinion you don't actually need a degree to become an animator - I certainly worked with plenty of them who didn't have this qualification, but in reality most people need the teaching / educational experience of a degree to gain the skills required to get a job as an animator. I would have a look at an Access course as a possibility if you want to study at HE level. Do be aware that the position of animator is very popular; the competition is not just other students, but mostly applicants from Europe where the best character animation schools are. Most of the animation companies in London are stuffed with mainland European graduates - you don't just need to be a great animator, you need to be better than the French, Germans and Danish
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    (Original post by moid)
    Contrary to popular opinion you don't actually need a degree to become an animator - I certainly worked with plenty of them who didn't have this qualification, but in reality most people need the teaching / educational experience of a degree to gain the skills required to get a job as an animator. I would have a look at an Access course as a possibility if you want to study at HE level. Do be aware that the position of animator is very popular; the competition is not just other students, but mostly applicants from Europe where the best character animation schools are. Most of the animation companies in London are stuffed with mainland European graduates - you don't just need to be a great animator, you need to be better than the French, Germans and Danish
    Well that is why I want to study Animation. lol =]


    Well I'm not too sure what would class as a mature student. I'm 20 and will be 21 in April, I would say I'm mature, very dedicated and passionate about animation. I will be working on a new portfolio / demo reel over the next month or two then add to it upon whatever work I do but the reason for me reworking my portfolio was due to a major loss of data and I didn't have everything backed up because it was a new computer I didn't expect the hard drive to fail on me.

    As soon as I have my new demo reel I will upload it and send you a link as the feedback would be great!

    Thank you for the reply and I will look into the access course.
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    (Original post by moid)

    Anyway back to answering Firepants. Thanks for the compliments

    I'd strongly advise joining a life drawing class or we are unlikely to accept you. Life drawing does not have to be expensive though, join the http://london-life-drawing-society.ning.com/ and you should be able to find your local group and most are very reasonable. Sketches of family members can be god (if done well enough) but we need to know whether you really understand anatomy, and you're only going to get that with life drawing. Digital painting is something we like, but not essential - as long as you have traditional painting skills that will be fine (we'll teach the digital painting). You should have images that show knowledge of perspective (two point or higher), colour theory and composition. I don't care what you draw/paint them in, as long as you are demonstrating those skills. Yes you can include work from your A-level as long as it's good If you are having to do nothing but copy Salvador Dali or Monet, well don't bother putting that in, or at the other end, if you are having to make a load of conceptual crap, leave that out as well. Look at the work and ask yourself - does this show talent? does this show ability to record the world outside yourself (or inside if it comes to that), does it show technical skill and creative design? Don't worry about a portfolio telling a story - although that is a good piece of advice if you are applying for a fine art course. Having images, each one that tells a story is a damn good idea, especially when making concepts for characters or environments. But we wouldn't expect that to extend through an entire portfolio.

    Regarding 3D yes we want to see it, we prefer to see work you've made yourself rather than tutorials because most (decent) tutorials also come with the files so we don't know if you just used those, plus it shows zero creativity on your part - and you do want to demonstrate creativity or there's no point in becoming an animator Screen captures of models are great. Show them from different angles.

    I don't know what other universities will want, but a MOV with h264 codec or MP4 file are the industry standards for compressed file delivery and that's what we like too Don't forget to compress the sound as well - ALaw or IMA 4:1 are good audio codecs.

    Hope that helps
    Thanks moid, it was very helpful I couldn't find a local group on the link you posted but I was reading through a local newsletter yesterday and I found a group that does all-day life drawing workshops (untutored but they're better than nothing) once a month, I wish I'd have found out about it earlier. I emailed them and found out they have one place left for the last workshop this year, lucky me . Also I found a life drawing program on 4OD-link I know it's not quite the same as drawing a model right in front of you, would it help my portfolio?

    If I upload some work, could you take a quick look at it? My art teacher has never really given me much guidance on technique (we have a big class) so any constructive criticism would be great.

    I don't know if I’ll have time to do much more than model my own 3D creations before the interview (if I get one) but I'll do as much as I can

    (Original post by Unlimitedsoph)
    Hi,

    I'm on the BA (Hons) Computer Animation course at Teesside, and I've been living here 5 weeks now, and Middlesbrough isn't as bad as I thought it would be. It's actually really clean, and a few of the locals look slightly dodgy, but in general everyone's friendly here, plus there is a lot of grass on campus so it feels less industrial. It's also so convenient being right in town, so in between lectures you can go home or pop into town with some friends and be back to a lecture within 3 minutes walk.

    So don't let Middlesbrough put you off applying to Teesside.
    Thanks for the reply . I plan to visit all my choices so I wouldn't reject a place just because I don't like the idea of it. Herts and Tees are the most specialised (in 3D) of all the courses I'm considering so I'll definitely apply to both.
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    I am currently studying BTEC Print-based Media and A2 Media and want to study 3D computer animation and was wondering, when applying for a course, will they focus more on the course you did or your actual portfolio of work because I did originally teach myself Photoshop and have a lot of my designs. The universities am currently looking at are Hertfordshire and Bournemouth, and Motion Graphics at Northumbria.
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    It depends on the course to be honest, but I would imagine that the majority would focus on your portfolio (we do at Hertfordshire). That said, you will need very good drawing skills and my experience of interviewing BTEC students from Print based courses is that they are not taught to draw anatomy or perspective (or anything usually). Ignore that remark if you are lucky enough to be on a BTEC that does teach those things. So if you are in this position, make sure you get extra drawing tuition to boost your skills, and practice as much as possible.
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    I'm so glad I've found a thread on this.

    I'm applying for computer animation & special effects at Leeds Met. I'm also applying to a couple of other courses related to the field but they are more video game related. I was wondering if for Leeds Met you need to show you're good at traditional art? I don't have much art experience outside of GCSE Art & Design. I stupidly threw out all my old art work too. I'm better at digital art as I've been practicing a lot with various 3D design programs, but I haven't really put pencil to paper and sat down to draw something in about 3-4 years. I'm on a gap year at the moment so touching up on anatomy and such is of no problem, I was just wondering if for Leeds Met it's a requirement.

    What would be fab if any current Leeds Met students could tell me about the interview & portfolio process? I've went from applying to a language course last year to now wanting to do a design course this year, so I'm a little unprepared for it all.

    The desire and motivation is all there, and the grades (I luckily exceed what they want) but I'm just unsure about my skills. Any help would be much appreciated!
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    Hi, for what it's worth, Animation and Video Game Design are two massively different things, the only related areas being that they could both lead to (totally different) roles within a video games developer. You should have a think about what you actually want to do for a living before going for one of those courses over the other. Making the game assets vs Designing what the assets actually do.
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    (Original post by moid)
    For Hertfordshire if you are applying for 3D, Games Art or VFX then yes I would say 3D work in the portfolio is essential (unless your traditional drawing skills are astounding). For 2D it's not a requirement. I think we only accepted four people this year without 3D in their portfolio. It's worth doing for a number of reasons. Firstly (and most importantly) it's a quick and cheap way to find out if you like 3D. If not, you will be wasting at least £10,000 to discover something you could find out for free. We have so many applicants that it's a risk taking someone on without 3D who then discovers they don't like it - we could've given that place to someone else who really wanted it. Having 3D in your portfolio also increases your chances of getting an offer for any other animation course, so it won't hurt you Last year we had 760 applicants, we interviewed 250 and we have 95 places to offer - so if you want to stand a good chance of getting a place, you will need to have 3D alongside the other work you show us.

    We don't mind what 3D program you use, but we will be teaching Maya. Some good news, as a student, you can have Maya for free! go to:

    http://students.autodesk.com/

    register and download it, completely legal and free.


    Please show us a 2D animation, we'd like to see that (as long as it contains proper frame by frame drawn character animation and not just eye blinks, flashing backgrounds or other anime clichés). We teach animation in 2D before we teach it in 3D because it is easier to pick up the concepts in 2D, and then transfer those skills to 3D afterwards. We'd like to see photos of clay models if they are realistic or stylised well - heads on their own will do if you can't make the whole form. Can you take some photos before you paint them please, it's easier to tell if you have the volume right that way. If you find that you are good at clay sculpting, you might want to look at the digital equivalents - ZBrush and Mudbox. You can get Mudbox for free from the above link.

    Maya comes with introduction tutorials, but you'll find masses of books and websites and DVDs for learning from. If you can afford it the Digital Tutors website is very good if you want to become skilled in the software quickly.
    I won't deny that this has panicked me quite a bit. I haven't been told at any university open evening (including hertfordshire) that it is essential to have 3D work so I am very worried. My traditional observational and life drawing skills are strong, but whether they are strong enough I am unsure to try and apply without 3D.

    I have followed the link and successfully downloaded Maya, however I am finding it very daunting and difficult to grasp. I know things will become clearer as I continue to practice and learn the basics, but in the meantime any basic tips would be a great help! Thanks
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    (Original post by JeezeJess)
    I won't deny that this has panicked me quite a bit. I haven't been told at any university open evening (including hertfordshire) that it is essential to have 3D work so I am very worried. My traditional observational and life drawing skills are strong, but whether they are strong enough I am unsure to try and apply without 3D.

    I have followed the link and successfully downloaded Maya, however I am finding it very daunting and difficult to grasp. I know things will become clearer as I continue to practice and learn the basics, but in the meantime any basic tips would be a great help! Thanks

    Hey,

    Not all Universities require 3D experience before you apply or start the course, in fact courses at Bournemouth Universities NCCA require no CG experience at all. 3D is not a Pre-requisite. This is never been a problem for us or our courses, our graduates go to be excellent practitioners within the industry, and have done for over 20 years. What is more important is excellent observational skills and/or technical ability. By technical ability I mean good maths or science background, as well some computer literacy (programming, scripting etc). The bias of whether you need more art or science skills depends on the course you apply for and whether it is a BA or BSc. But lets be clear there is no hard and fast rules to getting a place on a course, what is important is your ability to communicate, your passion regarding the subject and what informs you of your practise. We want talented ideas people who are going to be the next supervisors, lead artists or studio owners - that's got nothing to do with 3D knowledge (well maybe a teeny bit); its more important to have ideas, problem solving skills, artistry, design iteration, raw talent and confidence. The computer is just a tool - as far as i am concerned it is not important - its just an extension of our arms.

    I'll put an example of portfolios from applicants who have successfully joined the MA3D course. I don't have any examples of BA work, but A'Level or Art foundation is likely to be less developed and more experimental - and that's absolutely fine! What is important is that you can talk about your aspirations, your ideas, your design method and your portfolio.

    I'll post a link in a few minutes...
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    (Original post by JeezeJess)
    I have followed the link and successfully downloaded Maya, however I am finding it very daunting and difficult to grasp.
    Welcome to the next 40 years of your life!

    But really, there are a lot of buttons you won't need to touch for years. Have a google for "poly modelling Maya" - that's the key thing. That is to 3D what drawing a vase is to life drawing; A good starting point and somewhere to get familiar with the medium. It's also the first part of a production, so there's very little pre-requisite knowledge, and it's the basis for everything you'll do in 3D in the near to mid-term future. Also, just how some people probably make a living drawing Vases, it's also a skill that can eventually get you a job (not just a means to learning).
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    (Original post by Sofronis)
    Hey,

    I'll put an example of portfolios from applicants who have successfully joined the MA3D course. I don't have any examples of BA work, but A'Level or Art foundation is likely to be less developed and more experimental - and that's absolutely fine! What is important is that you can talk about your aspirations, your ideas, your design method and your portfolio.

    I'll post a link in a few minutes...
    As promised, some examples of Portfolio submissions when students were applying for the MA in 3D Computer Animation course. Some of these students may have already done a degree or have work experience so don't be too put off. If you are still doing an Art A'Level or foundation then this is fine, the BA tutors are able to spot potential and we expect the work to be of a good A'Level standard, experimental or a Work In Progress.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UP8QndaaTyA

    There is very little 3D work here; students who have applied in past tend to have weak 3D skills - or certainly undeveloped. However, if you feel your 3D work are the strongest pieces you have created, then obviously we would love to see them.

    Hope this helps.
 
 
 
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