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Best Universities for Computer Graphics/Animation? watch

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    Have you looked at Bucks New in High Wycombe. They do Animation and Visual Effects with the main tutor being Sydney Padua (she was the lead animator on the new Disney Jungle Book film). The uni does not rank high overall but their Animation course is brilliant and they have really good contacts for work after (an almost 100% success rate). They are one of only a couple of uni's that specialize in 3D with very little 2D work so not aimed at artists but computer nerds!
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    I never knew that you had to do a maths test to get onto the course at Bournemouth?? Is that only once you've passed the interview stage? I'm applying there next year and I haven't heard of that before, I'm terrible at maths
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    before i started uni last sep, i turned down Hertfordshire which were said to be nearly on par with Bournemouth.

    Just a personal tip, If you find 2 similar Animation course, tho they sound the same, but where as One Animation course might be more computer/digital base. you got other animation courses like Bournemouth which from my research are more artistic-orientated , artistic as in e.g. drawings,etc.

    At the end of the day, overall satisfaction from students already doing the course at the uni you'd like to goto is another factor to take in.
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    Good to see this thread revived again I'll politely disagree with your statements though - but for anyone considering animation, this thread is full of useful tips from different lecturers / universities as well as the students going to or studying at them.
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    Hi, I have applied to Hertfordshire for 2D Digital Animation and have a few questions! I should say I am also interested in the 3D Game Art & Design course.

    Okay. I wondered how frequently throughout the course is the life drawing (e.g. during each term/week etc.)? In what way might it be included in the course/how is it taught or not taught?

    What Animation software do students get taught in/use primarily? I believe a few years ago it was Adobe Flash but wondered if this is still the case? If it is still Flash, is there a reason why Flash is chosen rather than animation softwares like TVPaint or ToonBoom Harmony?
    I don't know much about the different animation softwares but I have just heard each one is better for different things so hope I can find out, to better my understanding.

    I also wanted to ask how the groupwork vs. individual projects works at herts. From what I have seen by looking at student work it seems like on (most?) projects people can choose whether they want to work individually or as part of a team, but I am unsure? How does it work/how is it organised when each project is set?

    Finally, for the Game Art & Design degree - do students end up making playable levels/whole games? Does doing this degree equip you if you want to eventually make, for example, 2D App games?

    I know I asked a lot of questions, I had collected them over time and appreciate any replies so much
    Thank you for your help
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    (Original post by highland.moo)
    Hi, I have applied to Hertfordshire for 2D Digital Animation and have a few questions! I should say I am also interested in the 3D Game Art & Design course.

    Okay. I wondered how frequently throughout the course is the life drawing (e.g. during each term/week etc.)? In what way might it be included in the course/how is it taught or not taught?

    What Animation software do students get taught in/use primarily? I believe a few years ago it was Adobe Flash but wondered if this is still the case? If it is still Flash, is there a reason why Flash is chosen rather than animation softwares like TVPaint or ToonBoom Harmony?
    I don't know much about the different animation softwares but I have just heard each one is better for different things so hope I can find out, to better my understanding.

    I also wanted to ask how the groupwork vs. individual projects works at herts. From what I have seen by looking at student work it seems like on (most?) projects people can choose whether they want to work individually or as part of a team, but I am unsure? How does it work/how is it organised when each project is set?

    Finally, for the Game Art & Design degree - do students end up making playable levels/whole games? Does doing this degree equip you if you want to eventually make, for example, 2D App games?

    I know I asked a lot of questions, I had collected them over time and appreciate any replies so much
    Thank you for your help
    Hi highlandmoo,

    It's great you've applied to Herts. I've tagged moid so he can help you with your questions

    Thanks,
    Heather
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    (Original post by highland.moo)
    Hi, I have applied to Hertfordshire for 2D Digital Animation and have a few questions! I should say I am also interested in the 3D Game Art & Design course.

    Okay. I wondered how frequently throughout the course is the life drawing (e.g. during each term/week etc.)? In what way might it be included in the course/how is it taught or not taught?

    What Animation software do students get taught in/use primarily? I believe a few years ago it was Adobe Flash but wondered if this is still the case? If it is still Flash, is there a reason why Flash is chosen rather than animation softwares like TVPaint or ToonBoom Harmony?
    I don't know much about the different animation softwares but I have just heard each one is better for different things so hope I can find out, to better my understanding.

    I also wanted to ask how the groupwork vs. individual projects works at herts. From what I have seen by looking at student work it seems like on (most?) projects people can choose whether they want to work individually or as part of a team, but I am unsure? How does it work/how is it organised when each project is set?

    Finally, for the Game Art & Design degree - do students end up making playable levels/whole games? Does doing this degree equip you if you want to eventually make, for example, 2D App games?

    I know I asked a lot of questions, I had collected them over time and appreciate any replies so much
    Thank you for your help

    Hi there, I'm one of the lecturers on those degrees. Regarding life drawing, this is mandatory once a week, and for those who want to really excell in the area we hold additional evening classes twice a week (these are not mandatory). Life drawing is taught in different ways depending on the class / year / project. In the first year there are shorter poses, getting students up to speed with drawing models, but that progresses into more complex areas like foreshortening and measuring proportion correctly, as well as shading. We teach life drawing in a traditional 19th century form - that is to say taugth by lecturers who can draw who want the students to learn to draw correctly and we avoid all the experimental rubbish that passes for teaching life drawing at most places. Obviously if you enjoy that sort of thing (drawing with the wrong hand, drawing blindfolded, drawing with shoes etc) then apply elsewhere. In the second year life drawing includes a lot of anatomy knowledge, so you draw the life model next to a posed skeleton (they are in the same pose) so that you learn about anatomy which is vital for any character modeller or animator. Some classes also make clay sculptures of the life model over a series of weeks to build their 3D dimensional understanding of volume. Other classes start with life drawing and then move those drawings into ZBrush (a digital sculpting package) to enable the character modellers to make models that show a deeper understanding of musculature and the flow of the topology of the surface - so making ecorché sculpts is very important (we also have ecorché sculptures that the students can draw from).

    When you say animation software I am assuming you mean the 2D Animation course (the Games Art course animates in Maya). We teach Adobe Animate (Flash), TV Paint and Toon Boom Harmony. You need different software for different tasks. For example anything interactive needs to be created in Animate because you can code as well as animate in that package. If you're working on a project that is purely animation you can use any of the software - so some students will prefer TV Paint to Toon Boom Harmony and vice versa. The important thing is to try them all and to find out which one works for you. The cartoon series industry uses either Toon Boom or TV Paint - each company is generally focussed on only one of these packages; so learning enough to get by in both is a good idea if that is a future career plan for you. We also teach animation in After Effects for rigged 2D characters, and we do some roto work in Photoshop.

    At Hertfordshire most projcts are individual, however for the large projects (making short animations etc) we totally recommend working in a group because for most people this will enable them to achieve a greater result than was possible if they worked on their own. Plus it's vital for industry experience - there is no such thing as a solo aniamtor who works on their own; everyone works in teams and it's one of the skills that an employer looks for - not just is your work good, but also did you make it in a team, to see how well you cope with that sort of dynamic. If a project requires a team then in the majority of cases it is up to the students to choose who they work with. The only time we place anyone into set groups is at the start of the first year when nobody knows each other.

    Games Art degree - yes the students either build playable games / levels or they build realtime animated sequences in a gmae engine (cut scenes / intro scenes to a game). Yes you could make a 2D games in the 3D Games Art degree, although we actually teach making 2D games in the 2D Animation degree becasue most 3D students want to work in 3D (although we do have a group of 3D Students making a 2.5D game this year which looks very interesting - you can see a quick test of it here if you want https://www.artstation.com/artwork/LPoA5

    Make sure you ask questions of all the courses you are interested in - you are about to get yourself into an enormous amount of debt, so you should only do so after making sure that the course you choose is right for you.
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    (Original post by moid)
    Hi there, I'm one of the lecturers on those degrees.
    Hi! I read your reply a few weeks ago but realised I didn't say thank you! Thank you so much for such a thorough response, it was so helpful and gave a better idea of how the course is. I had been to open days but didn't have the same questions in mind back then so it answered a lot of unanswered questions.

    I hope it's okay, I might come back with more questions at some point if I need to

    The 2.5D game looks amazing! I look forward to see how it turns out at the finish!
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    No problem, thanks for the kind words about the Lyra project. Ask away when you want to.
 
 
 
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