Nose piercing in legal career? Watch

zee1994x
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#1
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I have a nose piercing, currently a stud but I am wanting to change it to a ring. I am currently studying law at uni so just wondering if anyone has any experience with piercings in this area?

I'd be happy to change it to a small stud whenever I was working but I would be gutted if I had to fully take it out.
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insert-username
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If i'm being perfectly honest here, a nose piercing unconsciously reduces the professional appearance of someone. Dont get me wrong, i love piercings and tattoos but its just a fact that when you see a person with a nose piercing, they instinctively don't seem as professional as someone without, even if they might be better. for example if a client had to choose between two potential lawyers, both well dressed in suits/professional clothing, they would instinctively choose the person without piercing.

that said, you're seeing things way too black and white. i know loads of people with piercings who just take them out in different situations. for example, for a job interview or client meeting they just take off the piercing and then put it back in afterwards. its no big deal.
the rule of thumb is to never have the piercing on in a professional meeting where you're meeting someone for the first time. this is so they'll make their first impression of you without the piercing. then its fine for you to have the piercing on when meeting the person again anytime afterwards. just take it off for first time meetings.
so its really not too black and white, having the piercing or not have the piercing.

Smalls studs are more inconspicuous. your gender can also influence the situation as girls with stud nose piercings will be percieved better than guys with nose piercings. if you're a girl then its likely that if you look/sound professional and aware in your profession then the nose piercing wont matter.
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zee1994x
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(Original post by insert-username)
If i'm being perfectly honest here, a nose piercing unconsciously reduces the professional appearance of someone. Dont get me wrong, i love piercings and tattoos but its just a fact that when you see a person with a nose piercing, they instinctively don't seem as professional as someone without, even if they might be better. for example if a client had to choose between two potential lawyers, both well dressed in suits/professional clothing, they would instinctively choose the person without piercing.

that said, you're seeing things way too black and white. i know loads of people with piercings who just take them out in different situations. for example, for a job interview or client meeting they just take off the piercing and then put it back in afterwards. its no big deal.
the rule of thumb is to never have the piercing on in a professional meeting where you're meeting someone for the first time. this is so they'll make their first impression of you without the piercing. then its fine for you to have the piercing on when meeting the person again anytime afterwards. just take it off for first time meetings.
so its really not too black and white, having the piercing or not have the piercing.

Smalls studs are more inconspicuous. your gender can also influence the situation as girls with stud nose piercings will be percieved better than guys with nose piercings. if you're a girl then its likely that if you look/sound professional and aware in your profession then the nose piercing wont matter.
Thank you for your input and giving both sides of the argument!
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neal95
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Definitely a big no no in large firms. Ou might be okay at some tiny high street firm in a far flung location but if you want to be taken seriously in the legal profession you will need to ditch the nose piercing
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nulli tertius
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(Original post by neal95)
Definitely a big no no in large firms. Ou might be okay at some tiny high street firm in a far flung location but if you want to be taken seriously in the legal profession you will need to ditch the nose piercing
Sometimes the oddest of ideas will appear on TSR. The idea that a female solicitor in a country town legal practice will have a less conventional appearance than a female solicitor in a City law firm is simply jaw dropping.


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neal95
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Think you might have got the wron end of the stick. Not meant to be offensive at all. I am a realist and surely if you believe that the same standard of appearance (when dealing with high paying clients) as opposed to more civilian every day actions in a "high street practice" then you must be deluded. Has absolutely nothing to do with sexism or any such matter.
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nulli tertius
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(Original post by neal95)
Think you might have got the wron end of the stick. Not meant to be offensive at all. I am a realist and surely if you believe that the same standard of appearance (when dealing with high paying clients) as opposed to more civilian every day actions in a "high street practice" then you must be deluded. Has absolutely nothing to do with sexism or any such matter.
First of all, most solicitors in the City rarely see any clients at all. Moreover most of the "clients" they meet are in no sense the owners of the businesses for whom they are acting.

The standards of dress maintained in city firms have little to do with clients. Most firms expect a high standard of turnout from staff simply because it is generally about the high standards they expect. However, undoubtedly the skirts may well be shorter and the jewellery less discrete than would be considered appropriate in a provincial firm.

High Street lawyers on the other hand mostly either deal personally with an older monied clientèle, a poor clientèle or go to court regularly, all of which encourage conservative dress. I still have female partners who would not dream of wearing trousers to work.

I think you have little idea of the personal wealth of the clientèle likely to be seen by the leading firms in a provincial city or town (or how hopelessly wrong the bottom end of the Sunday Times Rich List actually is).
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NamiChickenAngel
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...Personally, I think it's a different social norm than say ear piercings which are 'acceptable', sometimes preffered as low-key so studs, in white/black/silver/gold colours...whereas the nose piercing would stand out; added to this, clients want to have a legal professional who they feel they can trust to do their job well, so, obviously that depends on clients - but also what kind of level you'd be at. I imagine once you'd made a big name for yourself, for example, as a good lawyer, that having small 'eccentricities' would be allowed because your reputation has already been established (...mostly. Mostly it wont matter to the client) -so there's that element to it: they want to be able to talk to you, rely on you and your expertese in this legal matter, so they don't really want to have to think of you as a person, on a personal level - so nothing standing out, unfortunately, would probably help that. I think.BTW: I came onto this convo because there is another aspect to the question: multi-cultural society. To be clear, I would just take the piercing out at work. Maybe at networking events - and or galas, depending how up-town it is, I would wear either a low key stud, OR a ring (like with a lovely gown appropriate event). So, Indians (be it Hindus, Sikhs or Muslims or Buddhists in some aspects ect) tend to have the tradition (especially Hindus, from my knowledge, but from India lots of cultural norms bled through or were adopted sometimes) of getting a nose piercing (girls) when they became adults: women - so, in the West I've seen it taken mainly as either, once they're done with puberty(and/or 18 - so adults), when they hit puberty OR when they get married (usually but not always this one, a lot of the women in their current 30s did this). Context mostly covered - it's important however not traditionally considered conservative or professional in the West. So you see my conflict: I'm a HIndu born and raised here in the west, but my culture is two parts - one is hindu, indian. So I just wanted to know if having one would be considered as unprofessional by employers et al AND/OR Clients....given that I'm indian (and look it, just pointing that out - the expectations may be different there, but who knows, maybe it'd just brew unhappy thoughts). Or just their thoughts on it in general. Just some thoughts really - questions considering:Would they be politically correct - or feel that saying it's okay IS being politically correct?Would they be understanding? Would they NOT think it's unprofessional, as the context behind the decision isn't/doesn't follow through with 'just' body decoration or confidence, or idk stereotypical patterns of why adults/young people get things pierced and or tattoos? Or would they blanket ban all piercings in result of this conflict? (or just not hire me)
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