Medikit
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I have some questions about some things that I just cant understand. Hope you can help me with them:

- Why is the Golgi polarized?
- which organelle is responsible for glucose release?
- which organelle is responsible for ribosome genesis?

I have found that dictiosomes have polarized faces, cis and trans, but the one about ribosomes is just plain impossible to find.


thank you people of tsr!
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Eloades11
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(Original post by Medikit)
I have some questions about some things that I just cant understand. Hope you can help me with them:

- Why is the Golgi polarized?
- which organelle is responsible for glucose release?
- which organelle is responsible for ribosome genesis?

I have found that dictiosomes have polarized faces, cis and trans, but the one about ribosomes is just plain impossible to find.


thank you people of tsr!
I'm unsure about your first question, you'd need to look at specific papers to find the reasoning behind polarising the golgi apparatus.

For glucose release, it depends entirely on what type of cell you're talking about. It's not limited to a specific organelle, but is rather regulated by quantities of secondary metabolities as well as cell signalling. If there is excess glucose inside the cell, then it's often converted to energy storage or simply modified to help the cell retain glucose. If there's low blood-sugar levels, then extracellular signalling aids in cell secretion of glucose into the blood, which the process involved secretory mechanisms and regulation of transcriptional genes involved in glucose efflux.

The process of ribosome biogenesis is relatively simple but differs based on whether you are looking at eukaryotes or prokaryotes. I will attach a link below to the wikipedia page explaining this, as it will be a lot easier for you to read it directly rather than me copy and paste it here.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ribosom..._in_Eukaryotes
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