rach1996hol
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I'm really interested in aesthetic criticism as a focus for my eng lit coursework. I wanted to look at a poem, and decide to what extent it is "art". Can anyone help??? Some poem suggestions??? Any more info to help me out?
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katinthehat
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(Original post by rach1996hol)
I'm really interested in aesthetic criticism as a focus for my eng lit coursework. I wanted to look at a poem, and decide to what extent it is "art". Can anyone help??? Some poem suggestions??? Any more info to help me out?
Hi,

Is there any which way you are leaning in terms of the aesthetics? If you wanted to go for the 'art has a purpose' route, I'd suggest Benjamin Zephaniah. His poems have a powerful educational message, but at the same time are very creative. Good ones are 'Biko the Greatness' and 'Having a Word'.
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rach1996hol
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(Original post by katinthehat)
Hi,

Is there any which way you are leaning in terms of the aesthetics? If you wanted to go for the 'art has a purpose' route, I'd suggest Benjamin Zephaniah. His poems have a powerful educational message, but at the same time are very creative. Good ones are 'Biko the Greatness' and 'Having a Word'.

Hi,

Thanks for your help. For my coursework, it has to be a discussion such as "to what extent can a poem of your choice be classed as art" or "an author/poet should be part of the English Lit canon, discuss why they should/shouldnt". The poems or book must be English. I originally considered E.E Cummings, but he is American. So to be cliche, I'm thinking Oscar Wilde, and focusing on the novel The Picture of Dorian Gray which discusses art and beauty. Plus, he did a lot of work on aesthetics.


Thanks though! I will check out Zephaniah!
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katinthehat
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(Original post by rach1996hol)
Hi,

Thanks for your help. For my coursework, it has to be a discussion such as "to what extent can a poem of your choice be classed as art" or "an author/poet should be part of the English Lit canon, discuss why they should/shouldnt". The poems or book must be English. I originally considered E.E Cummings, but he is American. So to be cliche, I'm thinking Oscar Wilde, and focusing on the novel The Picture of Dorian Gray which discusses art and beauty. Plus, he did a lot of work on aesthetics.


Thanks though! I will check out Zephaniah!
Ahh I see! In that case, The Picture of Dorian Gray would be a good, easy choice - that's actually our text for the exam! Sometimes cliches are necessary

I don't know if you have the York Notes for PODG but it has a whole section on Aesthetics, you could borrow it off a teacher if you don't or it might be in your sixth form library?

Good luck!
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rach1996hol
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(Original post by katinthehat)
ahh i see! In that case, the picture of dorian gray would be a good, easy choice - that's actually our text for the exam! Sometimes cliches are necessary

i don't know if you have the york notes for podg but it has a whole section on aesthetics, you could borrow it off a teacher if you don't or it might be in your sixth form library?

Good luck! :d


i have just found out that we can only do british/american poets, no books or anything!! Any ideas???
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Oliguitar98
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This may help slightly...
How does Wilde's Aestheticism,evident in the preface, coincide with Paters idea in his preface?
In Wilde's preface, the concept of beauty within art isportrayed through aestheticism based on Pater and Ruskin's ideas. Wilde'spreface includes epigrams which portray his views on art work based mainly onWilde's view of ''art for arts sake''.
Wilde's aestheticism, which is evident in the preface,coincides with Paters idea's due to both of their views on ''art for artssake'' which is portrayed by ''the artist is the creator of beautiful things''.This highlights not only the fact that art is meant to be loved due to thebeauty, but also that within art, beauty should be formed. This type ofaestheticism, coincides with Paters ideas, however Wildes inconsistency withinhis views creates a complex understanding of his aestheticism, as he constantlycontradicts himself within the preface. Wilde shows this complexity with ''Vice andvirtue are to the artist materials for art'' which shows a sense of art not forarts sake as this quote highlights the importance of the artist and theirpersonality and qualities of humans and not the art for arts sake, to createart. This is shown by the way in which the quote highlights that art derivesfrom humans and qualities which contrasts Pater's ideas which believe inmaterials deriving from no certain qualities and just from emotion.
As well as this, the fact that Wilde's ideas on Aestheticismare not consistent, highlights the way in which he is not comfortable with hisown Aestheticism as he differs with views within the preface. ''All art isquite useless'' highlights not only the way in which true art is neverappreciated but also that ''art for arts sake'' has no meaning and therefore,not valued. Wilde's preface portrays his views on art and beauty and the factthat he understands that art is all useless, highlights the way in which beautyhas importance to create emotion and not true meaning which coincides withPaters idea which believed in beauty of art. Also, Pater accepted the fact thatonly craftsmen and artists would understand true art which complies with thequote in the preface ''all art is quite useless''.
Wilde's epigrams in the preface coincide with Paters ideas,due to the fact that both Wilde and Pater believe in the aesthetic movement. The aesthetic movement, which was started byThéophile Gautier in the late 19th century, was loved by Wilde and Pater due tothe non-judgmental view or artwork. Wilde enjoyed the beauty of art andcancelling out meaning of politics and world problems within art and focusingon beauty.
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rach1996hol
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(Original post by Oliguitar98)
This may help slightly...
How does Wilde's Aestheticism,evident in the preface, coincide with Paters idea in his preface?
In Wilde's preface, the concept of beauty within art isportrayed through aestheticism based on Pater and Ruskin's ideas. Wilde'spreface includes epigrams which portray his views on art work based mainly onWilde's view of ''art for arts sake''.
Wilde's aestheticism, which is evident in the preface,coincides with Paters idea's due to both of their views on ''art for artssake'' which is portrayed by ''the artist is the creator of beautiful things''.This highlights not only the fact that art is meant to be loved due to thebeauty, but also that within art, beauty should be formed. This type ofaestheticism, coincides with Paters ideas, however Wildes inconsistency withinhis views creates a complex understanding of his aestheticism, as he constantlycontradicts himself within the preface. Wilde shows this complexity with ''Vice andvirtue are to the artist materials for art'' which shows a sense of art not forarts sake as this quote highlights the importance of the artist and theirpersonality and qualities of humans and not the art for arts sake, to createart. This is shown by the way in which the quote highlights that art derivesfrom humans and qualities which contrasts Pater's ideas which believe inmaterials deriving from no certain qualities and just from emotion.
As well as this, the fact that Wilde's ideas on Aestheticismare not consistent, highlights the way in which he is not comfortable with hisown Aestheticism as he differs with views within the preface. ''All art isquite useless'' highlights not only the way in which true art is neverappreciated but also that ''art for arts sake'' has no meaning and therefore,not valued. Wilde's preface portrays his views on art and beauty and the factthat he understands that art is all useless, highlights the way in which beautyhas importance to create emotion and not true meaning which coincides withPaters idea which believed in beauty of art. Also, Pater accepted the fact thatonly craftsmen and artists would understand true art which complies with thequote in the preface ''all art is quite useless''.
Wilde's epigrams in the preface coincide with Paters ideas,due to the fact that both Wilde and Pater believe in the aesthetic movement. The aesthetic movement, which was started byThéophile Gautier in the late 19th century, was loved by Wilde and Pater due tothe non-judgmental view or artwork. Wilde enjoyed the beauty of art andcancelling out meaning of politics and world problems within art and focusingon beauty.


Thanks, that definitely helped with my understanding of aesthetics. However, I can't compare people or anything just has to be one poem! I have strayed away from Wilde as he talks a lot about aesthetics himself. I need to analyse something aesthetically myself, instead of just re-quoting them! Thanks again though
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