chidchilli
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I'm in my final year of A levels, I got AAAC last year and sent off my UCAS app in October with most of my offers already recieved. i'm going to firm Warwick for History, but I'm concerned that I'm going to regret this later. Like anyone else, I'm only going to uni to improve my job prospects but after reading around on the internet it seems like History will get me absolutely nowhere. I'm aware of the arguments for history, "can go into anything and keeps your option open" "many go in to law", this is what sold it to me in the Summer, but reading around that doesnt seem to be the case and now I'm seriously thinking about it. Any history graduates with advice or experience? Or anyone else, I really need different views on this (even if they are harsh). Am I bettter off looking into apprenticeships to get experience instead? Or possibly a different degree? (I have no science subjects and I think I'm starting to regret it)
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jelly1000
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(Original post by chidchilli)
I'm in my final year of A levels, I got AAAC last year and sent off my UCAS app in October with most of my offers already recieved. i'm going to firm Warwick for History, but I'm concerned that I'm going to regret this later. Like anyone else, I'm only going to uni to improve my job prospects but after reading around on the internet it seems like History will get me absolutely nowhere. I'm aware of the arguments for history, "can go into anything and keeps your option open" "many go in to law", this is what sold it to me in the Summer, but reading around that doesnt seem to be the case and now I'm seriously thinking about it. Any history graduates with advice or experience? Or anyone else, I really need different views on this (even if they are harsh). Am I bettter off looking into apprenticeships to get experience instead? Or possibly a different degree? (I have no science subjects and I think I'm starting to regret it)
It depends what you want to do. Most apprenticeships are vocational in nature and designed to prepare you for a particular trade business admin aside. If your aspiring to a career that requires a degree and it doesn't specify a particular subject (which is the case for most graduate jobs) then it makes sense to take a subject your passionate about. A degree is though only one part of getting a job, any work experience you gain is important as are job applications and interview performances.
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constantino_chr
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I'd actually say it is one of the most useful; it is known to be a difficult subject so getting a good degree (1st or 2:1) from a good and respectable university will look good to respective employers. When it comes to employment there is still a large emphasis on what uni you went to, rather than the course (unless it is completely irrelevant).

It's also about your contacts and your ability to network with influential people in your field, that really helps.

My advise would be do something you love, and History at Warwick is a fantastic opportunity, uni's of that calibre tend to have excellent Career's departments to advise you further but for now enjoy the opportunity.
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chidchilli
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(Original post by jelly1000)
It depends what you want to do. Most apprenticeships are vocational in nature and designed to prepare you for a particular trade business admin aside. If your aspiring to a career that requires a degree and it doesn't specify a particular subject (which is the case for most graduate jobs) then it makes sense to take a subject your passionate about. A degree is though only one part of getting a job, any work experience you gain is important as are job applications and interview performances.
I have no idea what I want to do. That's the scary part and what's got me worried. Like most people I'm applying to Uni as it seems to be the norm and the "next step" really. I'm getting the impression that some degrees -if not career specific- are worth very little in the working world though, idk. Thanks though


(Original post by constantino_chr)
I'd actually say it is one of the most useful; it is known to be a difficult subject so getting a good degree (1st or 2:1) from a good and respectable university will look good to respective employers. When it comes to employment there is still a large emphasis on what uni you went to, rather than the course (unless it is completely irrelevant).

It's also about your contacts and your ability to network with influential people in your field, that really helps.

My advise would be do something you love, and History at Warwick is a fantastic opportunity, uni's of that calibre tend to have excellent Career's departments to advise you further but for now enjoy the opportunity.
Yeah that's why I was considering going straight into work to build those links and experience, but I've also been told that employers are increasingly looking to employ graduates so that brings uni back into things. I guess I haven't made a mistake. Thanks, you've really helped.
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inachigeek21
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History is the most prestigious degree one can ever receive.
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JamesManc
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Depends, history is my favourite subject ever since primary school. I didn't study history at uni (did gcse, a-levels), but I wish I did looking back. Not everything depends on 'what gets a job' do what you love!
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chidchilli
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(Original post by JamesManc)
Depends, history is my favourite subject ever since primary school. I didn't study history at uni (did gcse, a-levels), but I wish I did looking back. Not everything depends on 'what gets a job' do what you love!
Well since I'm going to uni to increase my job prospects, and with over £27000 of debt, it really is about that. History is what I love, thats why I chose it, but if it ain't going to do anything for me in the future I'd rather study something that will or avoid the uni route completely. Thats why I need help with it.
Thanks for the reply

Oh, and what did you study? Do think it helped? (If you don't mind me asking)


Too bawse for you, sir.
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chidchilli
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(Original post by inachigeek21)
History is the most prestigious degree one can ever receive.
In terms of getting a good job?


Too bawse for you, sir.
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kaizzu
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I'm doing History at uni, and whilst I enjoy it I probably wouldn't be doing it if I was any good at sciences/maths.

But anyway, unless you're going to Oxbridge or doing Medicine/Engineering it's still going to be hard to get a decent job even if you're doing a degree that's perceived as being more useful than History, like say Economics.
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chidchilli
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(Original post by kaizzu)
I'm doing History at uni, and whilst I enjoy it I probably wouldn't be doing it if I was any good at sciences/maths.

But anyway, unless you're going to Oxbridge or doing Medicine/Engineering it's still going to be hard to get a decent job even if you're doing a degree that's perceived as being more useful than History, like say Economics.
Yeah, that's why I wish I picked some science subjects for A level. I think I would have been capable in doing them, I was just ill-informed at the time. Thanks and good luck.
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sydneybridge
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History is one of the most 'usable' degrees - its one of the reason its so popular.

What can you do with a history degree? Anything and everything, as this 2010 report suggests - so teaching and 'working in a museum' are actually not what History grads do at all. As recent studies have shown, 'History graduates are found in disproportionate numbers on the boards of the UK's top 100 companies.' This means that the skills obtained reading history are highly valued in the 'real world' of corporate management - and a thousand other career areas.
A History degree gives you valuable skills that employers want. They are after the 'trained brain' not the specific subject knowledge. They value things like - analytical skills, research, writing, accuracy, reasoned arguments, presentation skills etc etc. The skills that people acquire when studying for a History degree can be used in all sorts of jobs and are much valued by mainstream employers.

What do History graduates do?
from University of Kent and St Andrews

Jobs Desk (Museum jobs) run by the University of Leicester - here will give you an idea of the jobs (and career progression) of those working in this area.
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constantino_chr
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The point of a degree is pursuing a subject you enjoy, then you can sell it to employers - whatever it is. The university itself is arguable more important than the course nowadays


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Princepieman
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(Original post by chidchilli)
Yeah, that's why I wish I picked some science subjects for A level. I think I would have been capable in doing them, I was just ill-informed at the time. Thanks and good luck.
Dude, just because a particular degree doesn't have an immediate job aligned to it after university doesn't mean it's bad. The vast majority of graduate schemes don't tend to specify a degree subject, meaning, it comes down to the individual and what skills you have developed.

There's been a recent study that has found History to be one of the most common degrees CEOs and other leaders have. That tells you something about the potential of history grads.

Bottom line: do a degree you enjoy as long as you are aware of the opportunities out there. History is an eexremely respected degree and shouldn't hold you back - only you can do that by not seeking the right employment/skill developing opportunities.
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chidchilli
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(Original post by Princepieman)
Dude, just because a particular degree doesn't have an immediate job aligned to it after university doesn't mean it's bad. The vast majority of graduate schemes don't tend to specify a degree subject, meaning, it comes down to the individual and what skills you have developed.

There's been a recent study that has found History to be one of the most common degrees CEOs and other leaders have. That tells you something about the potential of history grads.

Bottom line: do a degree you enjoy as long as you are aware of the opportunities out there. History is an eexremely respected degree and shouldn't hold you back - only you can do that by not seeking the right employment/skill developing opportunities.
Thanks
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sydneybridge
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(Original post by chidchilli)
In terms of getting a good job?
.

That is entirely up to you - not the course you did or the Uni you went to.
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sydneybridge
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(Original post by constantino_chr)
The university itself is arguable more important than the course nowadays
What utter rubbish.

If this was true there wouldnt be any unemployed Oxbridge graduates would there? And there are - thousands of them.

Think about what employers are actually looking for. It certainly isnt the name of the Uni. In 2013 Northampton graduates had an unemployment rate of 4.3 per cent, and Derby’s was 3.9 per cent. Oxford’s was 8 per cent and Cambridge’s 5.1 per cent. Which Unis will give you more usable job skills? Clearly not Oxford or Cambridge.
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EleanorFrost
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(Original post by chidchilli)
Yeah, that's why I wish I picked some science subjects for A level. I think I would have been capable in doing them, I was just ill-informed at the time. Thanks and good luck.
I am in the exact same position as you. At first I was happy to get offers, but now I'm losing sleep over this.
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BethhPhill
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I'm a 3rd year history student now and am interested in journalism. The good thing about history is there are a lot of transferable skills and employers particularly like the analytical skills you pick up in history.

Everyone thinks that a history student means the next primary school teacher, museum curator or librarian - but it can actually take you in a lot of directions you wouldn't expect.

Everyone is in the same boat at the end of it though, it's hard for everyone trying to find a job and you often question if your degree has been worth it.

But uni is a fantastic experience and though there's a lot of essays, I'd recommend history. Like the person said above - the uni you go to is sometimes more important.
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Josb
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(Original post by chidchilli)
I'm in my final year of A levels, I got AAAC last year and sent off my UCAS app in October with most of my offers already recieved. i'm going to firm Warwick for History, but I'm concerned that I'm going to regret this later. Like anyone else, I'm only going to uni to improve my job prospects but after reading around on the internet it seems like History will get me absolutely nowhere. I'm aware of the arguments for history, "can go into anything and keeps your option open" "many go in to law", this is what sold it to me in the Summer, but reading around that doesnt seem to be the case and now I'm seriously thinking about it. Any history graduates with advice or experience? Or anyone else, I really need different views on this (even if they are harsh). Am I bettter off looking into apprenticeships to get experience instead? Or possibly a different degree? (I have no science subjects and I think I'm starting to regret it)
If you can go to Russell group uni, the subject doesn't really matter.
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Josb
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(Original post by sydneybridge)
What utter rubbish.

If this was true there wouldnt be any unemployed Oxbridge graduates would there? And there are - thousands of them.

Think about what employers are actually looking for. It certainly isnt the name of the Uni. In 2013 Northampton graduates had an unemployment rate of 4.3 per cent, and Derby’s was 3.9 per cent. Oxford’s was 8 per cent and Cambridge’s 5.1 per cent. Which Unis will give you more usable job skills? Clearly not Oxford or Cambridge.
Many Oxbridge graduates don't work because they inherit daddy's money.
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