rubarbman12
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Hi there,

I was looking into the ideal gas laws. Although they've been proven on Earth, has the law been testing in space, eg) by satellite or on the space station?

More specifically has gay-lussacs law which says the pressure of a given mass of gas varies directly with the kelvin temperature when the volume remains constant. Has this even been tested in space, and would it be relevant within a space station environment?

Thanks!
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langlitz
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(Original post by rubarbman12)
Hi there,

I was looking into the ideal gas laws. Although they've been proven on Earth, has the law been testing in space, eg) by satellite or on the space station?

More specifically has gay-lussacs law which says the pressure of a given mass of gas varies directly with the kelvin temperature when the volume remains constant. Has this even been tested in space, and would it be relevant within a space station environment?

Thanks!
I'm a little confused... You're asking whether the gas laws apply in space? There is no atmosphere in space, it's a vacuum
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rubarbman12
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(Original post by langlitz)
I'm a little confused... You're asking whether the gas laws apply in space? There is no atmosphere in space, it's a vacuum
I mean inside a space station, a space station environment or does 0G effect the laws?
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langlitz
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(Original post by rubarbman12)
I mean inside a space station, a space station environment or does 0G effect the laws?
No gravity has no effect on the laws, what makes you think it would?
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rubarbman12
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(Original post by langlitz)
No gravity has no effect on the laws, what makes you think it would?
To be honest, I don't have a clue. I was tasked with the challenge to come up with an idea for an experiment that could be carried out on the ISS.
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Plantagenet Crown
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(Original post by rubarbman12)
Hi there,

I was looking into the ideal gas laws. Although they've been proven on Earth, has the law been testing in space, eg) by satellite or on the space station?

More specifically has gay-lussacs law which says the pressure of a given mass of gas varies directly with the kelvin temperature when the volume remains constant. Has this even been tested in space, and would it be relevant within a space station environment?

Thanks!
Huh? Space is a vacuum....

Inside a space station then the ideal gas laws would still be the same.
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517340
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(Original post by rubarbman12)
To be honest, I don't have a clue. I was tasked with the challenge to come up with an idea for an experiment that could be carried out on the ISS.
At small practical scales, the effects of gravity on a gas doesn't really matter, it's only at large altitude differences where any of that has an effect (lower air pressure etc).

So you have to make an experiment that can be carried out in the ISS, any particular theme? Does it have to be about gas laws or can it be anything? Such as the physics of fluids of different densities - Oil floats on water, so what happens when you put a bubble of water towards a bubble of oil? Could you make a layered sphere? And so on? Water in space is crazy.

Maybe test how to make a robot with a gyroscope that adjusts itself 'upright' with respect to a signal or stops itself from spinning if it collides with something?
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rubarbman12
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(Original post by Ruthless Dutchman)
At small practical scales, the effects of gravity on a gas doesn't really matter, it's only at large altitude differences where any of that has an effect (lower air pressure etc).

So you have to make an experiment that can be carried out in the ISS, any particular theme? Does it have to be about gas laws or can it be anything? Such as the physics of fluids of different densities - Oil floats on water, so what happens when you put a bubble of water towards a bubble of oil? Could you make a layered sphere? And so on? Water in space is crazy.

Maybe test how to make a robot with a gyroscope that adjusts itself 'upright' with respect to a signal or stops itself from spinning if it collides with something?
Well the idea is much like the experiments carried out up there today, a program will be run on a computer which uses sensors such as barometric sensor, gyroscope, accelerometer, magnatometer, temp sensor and infra-rad camera. This experiment is to collect data throughout the day.
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(Original post by rubarbman12)
Well the idea is much like the experiments carried out up there today, a program will be run on a computer which uses sensors such as barometric sensor, gyroscope, accelerometer, magnatometer, temp sensor and infra-rad camera. This experiment is to collect data throughout the day.


Have a look at this video and maybe a couple of other ones on the same channel, it may help give you a good idea!
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