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    I know that the cell wall stops the cell from getting larger BUT is it also because the pressure potential builds up this reduces the influx of water so the cell dont burst?
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    (Original post by Tj789)
    I know that the cell wall stops the cell from getting larger BUT is it also because the pressure potential builds up this reduces the influx of water so the cell dont burst?
    yes

    In animal cells, the \psi building up doesn't stop in inflow of water, so the cells undergo haemolysis and die. The cell wall is what stops this
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    No - the pressure potential doesn't contribute to the cell not bursting, because by the time the pressure is high enough to prevent further water going in, the cell would've burst a long time ago if it weren't for the cell wall.
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    (Original post by morgan8002)
    yes

    In animal cells, the \psi building up doesn't stop in inflow of water, so the cells undergo haemolysis and die. The cell wall is what stops this
    I don't think haemolysis is the correct term for this. Haemolysis is the disintegration of red blood cells. I believe the right word here is cytolysis. Bursting of cells due to an osmotic imbalance.

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    To clarify, the increase in \psi doesn't have much effect on whether water enters the cell because the \psi is still negative, so water will still enter the cell. If there is no cell wall, the cell will now burst. If there is a cell wall, the pressure inside of the cell increases as the cell cannot expand, so water no longer enters the cell.
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    (Original post by arbucks)
    I don't think haemolysis is the correct term for this. Haemolysis is the disintegration of red blood cells. I believe the right word here is cytolysis. Bursting of cells due to an osmotic imbalance.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    I think this effect was first observed in red blood cells, hence haemolysis. Cytolysis is probably a more correct term, but haemolysis can be used
 
 
 
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