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    Anyone doing aqa psychology B?
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    Sorry you've not had any responses about this. Are you sure you’ve posted in the right place? Posting in the specific Study Help forum should help get more responses. Hopefully someone will be able to get back to you
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    (Original post by maariyah97)
    Anyone doing aqa psychology B?
    I am :ciao: Hopefully we will find some more Psychology B'ers once the term starts!

    What topics have you chosen?
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    (Original post by sarahevaline)
    I am :ciao: Hopefully we will find some more Psychology B'ers once the term starts!

    What topics have you chosen?
    Hello! Yes, Im doing AQA psychology B, it seems like there really isnt any of us!

    Im doing social development for child development and schizophrenia and mood disorders and forensic psychology for applied options. What about you?
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    (Original post by khaleesi_)
    Hello! Yes, Im doing AQA psychology B, it seems like there really isnt any of us!

    Im doing social development for child development and schizophrenia and mood disorders and forensic psychology for applied options. What about you?

    Hey! I'm so sorry, I didn't seem to get a notification for your reply! I am doing Moral Development, Substance Abuse and Forensic Psychology!

    Do you use any websites that you find helpful?

    Good luck with your revision! I hope everything is going well so far!
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    I'm doing moral development/cognition and law/forensic psychology

    find it a lot harder than AS for some reason, essays don't seem as simple
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    (Original post by SteBrazier95)
    I'm doing moral development/cognition and law/forensic psychology

    find it a lot harder than AS for some reason, essays don't seem as simple
    A2's are definitely a lot more difficult!
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    (Original post by sarahevaline)
    I am :ciao: Hopefully we will find some more Psychology B'ers once the term starts!

    What topics have you chosen?
    I've chosen cognitive development, substance abuse and forensic psychology. Forensic psychology seems the hardest for me, do we need to know any specific study in more detail than compared to others?
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    Hello! I'm doing social development, schizophrenia and mood disorders and forensic psychology!

    (Original post by maariyah97)
    I've chosen cognitive development, substance abuse and forensic psychology. Forensic psychology seems the hardest for me, do we need to know any specific study in more detail than compared to others?
    For measuring crime the most specific study we had was the Farrington & Dowds study for official statistics - they found that Nottinghamshire are more likely to record smaller thefts than the neighbouring police forces. For the British Crime Survery in 2004/5 it was found that 5.6 million offences were recorded by the police, but 10.7 million were recorded by the BCS. Finally, for self-report offender surveys, they showed in 2006 that young people revealed that their crimes were usually alcohol or drug related and consisted of violence and theft.

    For offender profiling there is the study by Canter that we had to know about - he studied serial killers to see if they were organised or disorganised using the "smallest space analysis" - tested for co-occurrences of 39 variables over 100 cases. Found that serial killers were typical of organised. For geographical profiling, we studied the case study of John Duffy (railway rapist), Jack the Ripper and Peter Sutcliffe and then Lundrigan & Canter, who argued that all criminal spatial decision is influenced by social, cognitive and economic factors (age, intelligence, marital status, job etc)

    For the explanations:
    Cesare Lombroso (1876) for the physiological explanation
    Sheldon (1949) and his somatotype theory (this is still part of the physiological explanation, just the other part)
    For twin studies of the biological explanation - Lange (1929) and Christiansen (1977)
    For adoption studies of biological explanation - Crowe (1972) and Hutchings & Mednick (1975)
    Eysenck's personality theory - also Zuckerman (1969) and Farrington et al (1982) as part of the evaluation
    Social Learning Theory - Bandura et al (1963) - also Sutherland's differential association theory (1939), and then Farrington as evaluation
    Psychodynamic - Freud, and then Hoffman (1977) as part of evaluation

    For treatment programmes:
    Behaviour modification - Cullen & Sneddon (1981) and then Hobbs & Holt (1976) and Rice et al (1990) for evaluation
    Anger management - Fiendler et al (1984), Ainson (2000) and Law (1997) - all evaluation
    Social skills training - Long & Sherer (1985) and then Spence & Marziller for evaluation

    For custodial sentencing:
    Cullen & Minchin (2000)
    Doherty (2001)
    Bartol (1995)
    Bukshel & Kilmann (1980)
    Glaser (1983)
    Walker & Farrington (1981)
    Davies & Raymond (2000)
    Most of these are quite short and used for evaluation, just giving results of experiments and not an in depth method. The biggest and most in depth study you need to know for this is the STANFORD PRISON EXPERIMENT by Zimbaro (1971)



    If you want to know any more information on any of these just let me know - our teacher throws loads of studies at us so we have loads to choose from
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    (Original post by Emma-Rowney)
    Hello! I'm doing social development, schizophrenia and mood disorders and forensic psychology!



    For measuring crime the most specific study we had was the Farrington & Dowds study for official statistics - they found that Nottinghamshire are more likely to record smaller thefts than the neighbouring police forces. For the British Crime Survery in 2004/5 it was found that 5.6 million offences were recorded by the police, but 10.7 million were recorded by the BCS. Finally, for self-report offender surveys, they showed in 2006 that young people revealed that their crimes were usually alcohol or drug related and consisted of violence and theft.

    For offender profiling there is the study by Canter that we had to know about - he studied serial killers to see if they were organised or disorganised using the "smallest space analysis" - tested for co-occurrences of 39 variables over 100 cases. Found that serial killers were typical of organised. For geographical profiling, we studied the case study of John Duffy (railway rapist), Jack the Ripper and Peter Sutcliffe and then Lundrigan & Canter, who argued that all criminal spatial decision is influenced by social, cognitive and economic factors (age, intelligence, marital status, job etc)

    For the explanations:
    Cesare Lombroso (1876) for the physiological explanation
    Sheldon (1949) and his somatotype theory (this is still part of the physiological explanation, just the other part)
    For twin studies of the biological explanation - Lange (1929) and Christiansen (1977)
    For adoption studies of biological explanation - Crowe (1972) and Hutchings & Mednick (1975)
    Eysenck's personality theory - also Zuckerman (1969) and Farrington et al (1982) as part of the evaluation
    Social Learning Theory - Bandura et al (1963) - also Sutherland's differential association theory (1939), and then Farrington as evaluation
    Psychodynamic - Freud, and then Hoffman (1977) as part of evaluation

    For treatment programmes:
    Behaviour modification - Cullen & Sneddon (1981) and then Hobbs & Holt (1976) and Rice et al (1990) for evaluation
    Anger management - Fiendler et al (1984), Ainson (2000) and Law (1997) - all evaluation
    Social skills training - Long & Sherer (1985) and then Spence & Marziller for evaluation

    For custodial sentencing:
    Cullen & Minchin (2000)
    Doherty (2001)
    Bartol (1995)
    Bukshel & Kilmann (1980)
    Glaser (1983)
    Walker & Farrington (1981)
    Davies & Raymond (2000)
    Most of these are quite short and used for evaluation, just giving results of experiments and not an in depth method. The biggest and most in depth study you need to know for this is the STANFORD PRISON EXPERIMENT by Zimbaro (1971)



    If you want to know any more information on any of these just let me know - our teacher throws loads of studies at us so we have loads to choose from
    Thank you so much, this is very useful.
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    (Original post by khaleesi_)
    Hello! Yes, Im doing AQA psychology B, it seems like there really isnt any of us!

    Im doing social development for child development and schizophrenia and mood disorders and forensic psychology for applied options. What about you?

    Hey! I'm doing all 3 as well but currently struggling on HOW to structure the exams, any idea???
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    Cognitive development, schizophrenia & mood disorders and forensic psychology over here. Anyone happen to be retaking PSYB2?
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    (Original post by vinta-gee)
    Hey! I'm doing all 3 as well but currently struggling on HOW to structure the exams, any idea???
    Our teacher gave us the four different types of essay questions you can get and how to structure your answers. She's currently a PhD student and since I've been using this I seem to be getting better marks

    Types of questions:
    Outline and compare
    Outline and evaluate
    Discuss
    Describe... Discuss strengths and weaknesses


    + Refer to evidence in most of them.

    1) DISCUSS

    Describe & explain (A01 marks)
    Analyse and evaluate (A02 marks)
    Compare to other approach/subject (AO2 marks)

    For example:
    "The most suitable treatment for schizophrenia is medication, and this treatment should take place in an intsitution." Discuss this view.

    - One line explanation of schizophrenia
    - Describe biological approach
    - How drug treatment works
    - Evaluate drug treatment
    - Compare to other approaches (social treatments that aren't in an institution)
    - Describe non-institutionalised treatment
    - How non-institutionalised treatment works
    - Evaluate non-institutionalised treatment

    And always used evidence of studies & statistics

    - 2 or 3 line conclusion

    2) OUTLINE AND COMPARE
    3) DESCRIBE AND DISCUSS
    THESE ARE THE SAME THING.

    You must use at least two treatments (usually what these questions ask about) so you can compare them to each other.

    - Describe and explain first thing
    - How first thing works
    - Describe and explain second thing
    - How second thing works
    - Work through TEARS (treatment, effectiveness, acceptability (is it unethical?), relapse and side effects) one by one, comparing both treatments at each point

    3) OUTLINE AND EVALUATE

    Usually used for approaches/explanations to things. Still do at least two explanations/approaches so you can compare them to each other in the evaluation.

    - Explain/describe first explanation/approach
    *you can then follow any of the above plans for this treatment: either describe a second and evaluate or evaluate first and then go on to second
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    I self taught B last year and took the AS and A2 together. Im resitting AS this summer as I struggled to put an essay together but by A2 I got the hang of it as my results show unit 1-D, unit 2-C & unit 3&4 where B's.

    The essay structure seems to be descripe the topic, name a study breifly describe and evaluate then evaluate the study.

    Does anyone have any predictions for this years exam or copies of last years papers. I honestly cannot remember what was on the paper last year, its a traumatic blur.
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    (Original post by Emma-Rowney)
    Our teacher gave us the four different types of essay questions you can get and how to structure your answers. She's currently a PhD student and since I've been using this I seem to be getting better marks

    Types of questions:
    Outline and compare
    Outline and evaluate
    Discuss
    Describe... Discuss strengths and weaknesses


    + Refer to evidence in most of them.

    1) DISCUSS

    Describe & explain (A01 marks)
    Analyse and evaluate (A02 marks)
    Compare to other approach/subject (AO2 marks)

    For example:
    "The most suitable treatment for schizophrenia is medication, and this treatment should take place in an intsitution." Discuss this view.

    - One line explanation of schizophrenia
    - Describe biological approach
    - How drug treatment works
    - Evaluate drug treatment
    - Compare to other approaches (social treatments that aren't in an institution)
    - Describe non-institutionalised treatment
    - How non-institutionalised treatment works
    - Evaluate non-institutionalised treatment

    And always used evidence of studies & statistics

    - 2 or 3 line conclusion

    2) OUTLINE AND COMPARE
    3) DESCRIBE AND DISCUSS
    THESE ARE THE SAME THING.

    You must use at least two treatments (usually what these questions ask about) so you can compare them to each other.

    - Describe and explain first thing
    - How first thing works
    - Describe and explain second thing
    - How second thing works
    - Work through TEARS (treatment, effectiveness, acceptability (is it unethical?), relapse and side effects) one by one, comparing both treatments at each point

    3) OUTLINE AND EVALUATE

    Usually used for approaches/explanations to things. Still do at least two explanations/approaches so you can compare them to each other in the evaluation.

    - Explain/describe first explanation/approach
    *you can then follow any of the above plans for this treatment: either describe a second and evaluate or evaluate first and then go on to second

    This is amazing! I'm so happy you have replied! I usually get 9 marks and my teachers say my problem is that I list evaluative points and I need to expand but the problem is that they complain it's too 'flowery' if that makes sense! This plan has helped me shorten it thank you so much!
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    (Original post by dmet)
    I self taught B last year and took the AS and A2 together. Im resitting AS this summer as I struggled to put an essay together but by A2 I got the hang of it as my results show unit 1-D, unit 2-C & unit 3&4 where B's.

    The essay structure seems to be descripe the topic, name a study breifly describe and evaluate then evaluate the study.

    Does anyone have any predictions for this years exam or copies of last years papers. I honestly cannot remember what was on the paper last year, its a traumatic blur.

    I got the exact results as you AND I'm resitting PSYB1 this summer.

    I'm not too sure what was on last years exam for A2 but I'm positive that AS unit one essays were behaviourism for approaches and explain one theory of the cognitive explanation for gender identity....


    Hope this helped!
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    (Original post by Emma-Rowney)
    Our teacher gave us the four different types of essay questions you can get and how to structure your answers. She's currently a PhD student and since I've been using this I seem to be getting better marks

    Types of questions:
    Outline and compare
    Outline and evaluate
    Discuss
    Describe... Discuss strengths and weaknesses


    + Refer to evidence in most of them.

    1) DISCUSS

    Describe & explain (A01 marks)
    Analyse and evaluate (A02 marks)
    Compare to other approach/subject (AO2 marks)

    For example:
    "The most suitable treatment for schizophrenia is medication, and this treatment should take place in an intsitution." Discuss this view.

    - One line explanation of schizophrenia
    - Describe biological approach
    - How drug treatment works
    - Evaluate drug treatment
    - Compare to other approaches (social treatments that aren't in an institution)
    - Describe non-institutionalised treatment
    - How non-institutionalised treatment works
    - Evaluate non-institutionalised treatment

    And always used evidence of studies & statistics

    - 2 or 3 line conclusion

    2) OUTLINE AND COMPARE
    3) DESCRIBE AND DISCUSS
    THESE ARE THE SAME THING.

    You must use at least two treatments (usually what these questions ask about) so you can compare them to each other.

    - Describe and explain first thing
    - How first thing works
    - Describe and explain second thing
    - How second thing works
    - Work through TEARS (treatment, effectiveness, acceptability (is it unethical?), relapse and side effects) one by one, comparing both treatments at each point

    3) OUTLINE AND EVALUATE

    Usually used for approaches/explanations to things. Still do at least two explanations/approaches so you can compare them to each other in the evaluation.

    - Explain/describe first explanation/approach
    *you can then follow any of the above plans for this treatment: either describe a second and evaluate or evaluate first and then go on to second
    This is very useful! Thank you.
    Do A2 essays require introductions? Also, are making 'comparisons' an AO2 point?
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    (Original post by dmet)
    I self taught B last year and took the AS and A2 together. Im resitting AS this summer as I struggled to put an essay together but by A2 I got the hang of it as my results show unit 1-D, unit 2-C & unit 3&4 where B's.

    The essay structure seems to be descripe the topic, name a study breifly describe and evaluate then evaluate the study.

    Does anyone have any predictions for this years exam or copies of last years papers. I honestly cannot remember what was on the paper last year, its a traumatic blur.
    I think the biological approach will come up in the Unit 1 paper, as it hasn't come up in the past few years.
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    (Original post by maariyah97)
    This is very useful! Thank you.
    Do A2 essays require introductions? Also, are making 'comparisons' an AO2 point?
    An introduction is okay, but only a little one line one. So, for example, if it's a question about schizophrenia then your introduction could be the definition of schizophrenia (split mind).

    Yes, comparisons are an AO2 point as it's an evaluation.

    She said to always compare a little bit even if it doesn't ask you to (just not as much) because it shows that you understand the other approaches/treatments too
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    How do you guys study for this? I find that I can't get in so much information! Do you have any good study techniques for this that you dont mind sharing ?
 
 
 
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