Turn on thread page Beta
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    i was watching the woman today on the news, i was at work but the TV was still at an adequate level. I had problems understanding her with the viel over her face, her accent was not overly strong but still.......

    The thing is the viel is a choice not mandatory (unlike for instance sikhs whose turban as far as i know is) as part of her religion. I think she should comprimise and remove it whilst in schools,
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Cathie86)
    Another point, as is often the case with these type of 'political correctness' type of debates, how many children/teachers/parents had problems understanding her but didn't say anything because they were worried about being called racist etc because of it. I raised an issue at college with a maths teacher we had who was foreign (can't remember the nationality) and the majority, if not all the class struggled to understand her explanations, I was told by my tutor not to take it further as I was risking being disciplined under college regualtions for racist comments and they eventually swapped my classes for me. Chances are there are many similar cases where people havn't spoken out or have but been shut up allowing situations to continue which aren't right just for the sake of trying to avoid upsetting people.
    Why do some British people think that others can't speak English properly?
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Cadre_Of_Storms)
    i was watching the woman today on the news, i was at work but the TV was still at an adequate level. I had problems understanding her with the viel over her face, her accent was not overly strong but still.......

    The thing is the viel is a choice not mandatory (unlike for instance sikhs whose turban as far as i know is) as part of her religion. I think she should comprimise and remove it whilst in schools,
    Some women would argue that it is mandatory.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by The Green Manalishi)
    Why do some British people think that others can't speak English properly?
    I was not saying that others can't speak english properly, I know there are some people who live in Britain but aren't from here originally who speak english very well, and there are people who are english who are rubbish at speaking their own language, it works both ways. What I was doing was trying to make a point about people worrying about being being classed as being racist if they criticise someone about something, such as their dress or accent (on good grounds to do so though.)

    I was not as someone said 'whining' that I couldn't understand the teacher I was referring to. I have many lecturers at uni now who are from various countries, I don't have a problem with that, most have an accent but are perfectly coherant. What I do have a problem with is when a teacher has such a poor grasp of the english language they cannot teach their subject and resort to copying out the textbook onto the board, they cannot write english letters so that is virtually unreadable. The teacher concerned was my a level maths teacher, the entire class dropped several grades when she started teaching us. My point is that when I complained about this I was in effect told to shut up I was being racist - no I would have complained about her if she was english or whatever, she couldn't do her job.

    The point I was trying to make originally, which is probably somewhat lost now, is that people end up scared to death of complaining and being perceived as being racist, which is probably what happens in many cases regarding people women who wear the veil, that people aren't happy with it, but don't want to say anything. If someone walked into a bank with a balaclava on chances are someone would ask them to take it off, someone walks in wearing a veil no one would want to say anything and risk being called racist and everything that would entail at work. The way this country seems to be going is that no one will criticise anyone for fear of being called racist, homophobic, sexist etc etc I am not saying that any of those things are right, but we seem to be going to far the other way.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    your example is ridiculous though. most people accept the veil as a relgious choice whereas a balaclava is just stupid. you CAN take that off if you wish. therefore your argument doesnt hold. why should we make people conform to 'our' standards and vice versa?

    and i really dont believe you at all that your school hired a 6th form teacher who couldnt write english. sorry.
    Offline

    11
    Finally, a thread on TSR debating Islam.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    I definitely don't think she should be able to wear a veil in the classroom. As it has probably been said before, this would pose serious problems for kids hard of hearing (I have a friend who is partially deaf and relies on lip reading in class a lot). I mean how are you supposed to even see her expression i.e. if she's happy with a piece of work you've done or not?
    Also wouldn't full body dress be really impractical in a classroom, especially if it's with younger children where you probably need to be a lot more active?
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Cathie86)
    I was not saying that others can't speak english properly, I know there are some people who live in Britain but aren't from here originally who speak english very well, and there are people who are english who are rubbish at speaking their own language, it works both ways. What I was doing was trying to make a point about people worrying about being being classed as being racist if they criticise someone about something, such as their dress or accent (on good grounds to do so though.)
    That's good you don't think all immigrants are bad at English or something. I wanted to make the distinction clear. I thought the way you pointedly asked about her english may have been a sign you were hinting that since she (might be, i don't know ) an immigrant they she might not have a good command of the english language. I'll take that back then.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by paddylad)
    I definitely don't think she should be able to wear a veil in the classroom. As it has probably been said before, this would pose serious problems for kids hard of hearing (I have a friend who is partially deaf and relies on lip reading in class a lot).
    That's fair, it'd be really hard for a hearing impaired person who relies on lip-reading.

    I mean how are you supposed to even see her expression i.e. if she's happy with a piece of work you've done or not?
    Voice changes, pitch and tone.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by nik87)
    your example is ridiculous though. most people accept the veil as a relgious choice whereas a balaclava is just stupid. you CAN take that off if you wish. therefore your argument doesnt hold. why should we make people conform to 'our' standards and vice versa?
    But the fact that many muslim women don't wear veils shows that it isn't purely a religious thing, and that there is a clear aspect of choice in the matter of whether to wear it or not. Or are you saying that only the women who wear veils are 'good' muslims? I'm sure the non-veil wearing women would disagree with you!
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by The Green Manalishi)
    Voice changes, pitch and tone.
    I suppose that's true, but I just think that wearing a veil would be impractical in this situation. It's good though I suppose because it helps open the children up to multiculturalism (so not sure that's what I mean, really hard to word, getting kids used to different people and religions I guess?).
    Although I can see that it is her preference, just like some people are vegan or choose not to work on their sabbath.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Kew)
    But the fact that many muslim women don't wear veils shows that it isn't purely a religious thing, and that there is a clear aspect of choice in the matter of whether to wear it or not. Or are you saying that only the women who wear veils are 'good' muslims? I'm sure the non-veil wearing women would disagree with you!
    That argument falls. There is an absence of some women in headscarf, doesn't mean it isn't Islamic.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    damn, beat me to it...
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    I wasn't talking about the headscarf.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by The Green Manalishi)
    Some women would argue that it is mandatory.
    but its not mandatory to thier religion hence why they dont all wear them
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Cadre_Of_Storms)
    but its not mandatory to thier religion hence why they dont all wear them
    That's exactly the point, you can't use that argument as it breaks down the minute i throw something at it. Here's another example: Some muslims don't pray, does that mean it isn't part of Islam? Yes, there's a difference in opinion on the topic, but there are women who think it's compulsory though
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by *Sparkle*)
    I think the fact she is a teaching assistant in a Primary School has a lot to do with it aswell, I think it'd be a be a bit different in a Secondary School because of maturer students, but if she were teaching me when I was about 5 years old I would have been scared. Very scared.

    well, maybe you would, but as i saw on tv, many kids from the school were muslims...after it is a muslim populated area..and seeing a veiled face is no big deal!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    like many christians believe in deifferent stuff...i.e. catholic/protestant,
    this is the same in Islam. Some people believe that the veil is obligatory, while the others believe its optional.
    i think its up about the spiritual feeling ones get....a constant reminder to them to do good....
    i'm not sure...it'dbe interesting to hear a veiled persons views!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    like many christians believe in deifferent stuff...i.e. catholic/protestant,
    this is the same in Islam. Some people believe that the veil is obligatory, while the others believe its optional.
    i think its up about the spiritual feeling ones get....a constant reminder to them to do good....
    i'm not sure...it'dbe interesting to hear a veiled persons views!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    like many christians believe in deifferent stuff...i.e. catholic/protestant,
    this is the same in Islam. Some people believe that the veil is obligatory, while the others believe its optional.
    i think its up about the spiritual feeling ones get....a constant reminder to them to do good....
    i'm not sure...it'dbe interesting to hear a veiled persons views!
 
 
 
Poll
Black Friday: Yay or Nay?
Useful resources

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.