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    About 3 weeks ago I had to have a circumcision, where I was given soluble stiches which I was told would fall out 10-14 days after the op from "contact with foregin object" eg underwear.

    It has been 3 weeks now and 3 of them still haven't come out - they are mainly at the top of my penis so this is the area that is having less contact with my underwear.

    Everything else has pretty much healed, but I am wondering if I need to take the stiches out myself. I am reluctant to start taking them out because I am worries that I might cause damage or start bleeding again or not take them out properly and cause further problems.

    Another thing to note is that I was only able to bathe it in a bath for about 1.5weeks and now that I am away from home I can only have a shower so I'm not sure if this will have affected the likelyhood of them falling out.

    Can anyone give me some advice on what they think I should do.

    Thanks
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    Put some tissue down your pants?
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    Ask a doctor, no one here will know for sure.
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    Surely a really hot bath will have taken care of it? I've had the old chop and this is how mine fell off. But like you, it took its sweet time.
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    how long did it take for all of them to fall out then?
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    Mine didn't fall out on their own really. (Not when I had a circumcision btw). I went back to the doc and he pulled them out. Nice. The ones that did come out though, I was in the shower and I just kinda tugged them and they came free.
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    Uuuurgh, I just remembered when I had stitches (regular ones, not soluble ones) in my foot, and the community nurse woman came round to remove them, and I SWEAR the thing she used was blunt or something... it was the weirdest most cringe-worthy feeling ever, like something trying to burst out of my foot from the inside. traumatic childhood memories.
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    Go and see a doctor.
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    Don't take them out yourself. That's asking for trouble!!! Go see a doc and see what they say.
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    problem is I am back at uni now and want to stay registered with my doctor at home. Will there be anyway that I can see a doctor down where I am who will sort it out?

    Failing that my mum said I should go in and ask to speak to a pharmacist who will have some idea on what I should do?
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    Why do you want to stay registered at home? You're more likely to need the doc during term time, and if you need it when you're home, you can go to your old surgery as like a visitor person thingy. I forget the term.

    You could go speak to a pharmacist, but whether or not you want to talk about your nob in a busy shop is up to you.
    • #2
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    Soluble stiches should come out/loose if you rub hard-ish with a towel - then just pull gently if they dangle (sounds ghastly but it's true..). If they don't miove with a bit of rough handling then go and see a GP.

    You can register as a temporary patient at any GP and keep ypur own - just go in and ask - be firm, they should not put you off - and an appointment with the practice nurse is what you need - unless you have to see a bloke.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Soluble stiches should come out/loose if you rub hard-ish with a towel - then just pull gently if they dangle (sounds ghastly but it's true..). If they don't miove with a bit of rough handling then go and see a GP.

    You can register as a temporary patient at any GP and keep ypur own - just go in and ask - be firm, they should not put you off - and an appointment with the practice nurse is what you need - unless you have to see a bloke.
    Do you really think this is a good idea with quite such a sensitive area? Especially given he's still probably more at risk from infection than normally?

    To the OP, just go and register with a new GP at uni - in the long run it'll probably be worth it.
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    (Original post by Helenia)
    Do you really think this is a good idea with quite such a sensitive area? Especially given he's still probably more at risk from infection than normally?

    To the OP, just go and register with a new GP at uni - in the long run it'll probably be worth it.
    i don't want to register with one because when I am back home their is a waiting list to get on a doctor's lists and after this year I will be abroad - then i will be back at home in my third year most likely.

    Wil a doctor help me out if I go and see him?
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    one that i'm not registered with I mean
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    Yes - say "I want to register as a temporary patient" and see what happens. The receptionist should be able to sort it.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/health/talking_..._registration_
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    Don't most Uni's have a medical centre on site? You could always pop along there and ask if your Uni has one?
 
 
 
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