emmalav
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Im quite confused. I dont do maths but do Physics. I am using equations for radioactivity but ensure what e means, how to type it in on the calculator and why i have to use it thanks much help is appreciated . Its in equations for acitivity A= A0e-λt
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Enrique767
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exponential function
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Bobjim12
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It can also mean energy...
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Schrödingers Cat
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(Original post by Bobjim12)
It can also mean energy...
Energy is a capital E
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Bobjim12
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(Original post by Schrödingers Cat)
Energy is a capital E
Not necessarily, at least the textbook doesn't represent it as a capital
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Enrique767
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(Original post by Schrödingers Cat)
Energy is a capital E
Yeah exactly!
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Flauta
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In that context it means Euler's number, it's represented as e on your calculator and it's around 2.718. On mine I think I get it by pressing the alpha button then the *10^x button, perhaps it's the same on yours.
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rachelc142
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(Original post by Bobjim12)
It can also mean energy...
but in this instance it means the exponential function because of the equation that OP is using
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Bobjim12
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(Original post by rachelc142)
but in this instance it means the exponential function because of the equation that OP is using
i see
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Student20142014
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(Original post by Bobjim12)
Not necessarily, at least the textbook doesn't represent it as a capital
Regardless, in the equation he gave..

e = exponential function

not energy
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Bobjim12
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(Original post by Student20142014)
Regardless, in the equation he gave..

e = exponential function

not energy
thank
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rachelc142
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(Original post by emmalav)
Im quite confused. I dont do maths but do Physics. I am using equations for radioactivity but ensure what e means, how to type it in on the calculator and why i have to use it thanks much help is appreciated . Its in equations for acitivity A= A0e-λt
so basically the exponential function shows the relationship between two variables, in this instance it is Activity, Time and the decay constant. This shows you that as 'x' or 'λt' increases a little bit, 'y' or 'A' increases a lot! Ie activity quickly increases in a short amount of time. You should look at some graphs of y=e^x and y=e^-x to help you understand this more alternatively borrow an A2 maths core book just for a little bit of revision/extra help.
Hope this helps!
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Joinedup
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/E_%28ma...al_constant%29

e=the base of natural logarithms, approx 2.718

if I wanted to get it up on the my (old fashioned) calculator I'd key
[ 1 ]
[ 2ndf ]
[ ln ]

ln is natural logarithm and the 2ndf of ln is e^x so I'm telling it to calculate e to the power of 1

---
as others have probably said you should revise logarithms or this bit of physics probably isn't going to make a lot of sense to you.

----
PS
in physics e can sometimes represent the charge on an electron but not usually in questions about half-life.
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KingStannis
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It means you ****ed up your exam mate
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emmalav
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(Original post by Joinedup)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/E_%28ma...al_constant%29

e=the base of natural logarithms, approx 2.718

if I wanted to get it up on the my (old fashioned) calculator I'd key
[ 1 ]
[ 2ndf ]
[ ln ]

ln is natural logarithm and the 2ndf of ln is e^x so I'm telling it to calculate e to the power of 1

---
as others have probably said you should revise logarithms or this bit of physics probably isn't going to make a lot of sense to you.

----
PS
in physics e can sometimes represent the charge on an electron but not usually in questions about half-life.
Thanks very much

Thank verm
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VTChris
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Lowercase e in the deep low-current applications is short for eV, electron-Volt energy. Enjoy the nano-world!
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