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IB vs A-Level Thread watch

  • View Poll Results: A-Levels, IB etc
    I do IB I'm pleased I did
    52.15%
    I do IB I wish I'd done A-levels
    11.66%
    I do A-levels I'm pleased I did A-levels
    17.79%
    I do A-levels I wish I'd done IB
    6.13%
    Still Deciding
    12.27%

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    (Original post by danglenister)
    That's not correct. I talked to an admission tutor there and they fully respect how easy A levels are. They just don't appreciate how hard the IB is. ;yes;
    wait I'm confused, do you mean they like or don't like A levels more? cuz what I understood from what you said is that they do like Alevels more... is it really what you meant?

    (Original post by danglenister)
    If they thought A-levels were better then they wouldn't be pioneering a new exam system :p:
    I never said Alevels were better, nor did I mean to say that they thought it was better. I just said if there was a reason why they seem to admission more Alevels students that IBs is that they might have a bias for their own systems.
    I remember in my ESL mock oral in 10th grade I mentioned something about the IB. and when I finished the test my teacher told me not to mention that I will be doing IB the next year if in case I got some weirdo examiner. Point being I've had this impression that the Secoundary education boards dnt like the IBs because it's taking their place... which also justifies why they're trying to adjust their system to a more complicated IB like system...
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    (Original post by ~Lc~)
    wait I'm confused, do you mean they like or don't like A levels more? cuz what I understood from what you said is that they do like Alevels more... is it really what you meant?
    They do like it more than the IB because they don't understand the IB.


    (Original post by ~Lc~)
    I never said Alevels were better, nor did I mean to say that they thought it was better. I just said if there was a reason why they seem to admission more Alevels students that IBs is that they might have a bias for their own systems.
    I remember in my ESL mock oral in 10th grade I mentioned something about the IB. and when I finished the test my teacher told me not to mention that I will be doing IB the next year if in case I got some weirdo examiner. Point being I've had this impression that the Secoundary education boards dnt like the IBs because it's taking their place... which also justifies why they're trying to adjust their system to a more complicated IB like system...
    I very much doubt that they have bias because 'it's their own system'.
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    it's not a big bias... but it's still a bias
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    (Original post by Nikoletta)
    Just out of curiousity, one of my teachers at school kept ranting and raving about [yes, here it comes, another oxbridge reference..] how Oxford and Cambridge prefer IB students to A-Level students. Do you think this is true?

    Also, as a lot of you are well into your courses, do you think it's impossible to get a solid 40 (roundabouts that mark) if you haven't got a bunch of A*s and As at GCSE?
    From the oxbridge thread it seems they are asking for 39/40 in IB. Surely this is a lot more difficult to get than 3As at A level? I know you have to do a super interview as well, but that applies whether you've done A levels or IB.
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    [QUOTE=ib too hard]i have heard from other people abt A - Levels.. plus universities give a better recognition to the IB than the A - Levels. for example in the US, even for admissions in the UK thru UCAS.. IB's 38 points is equal to 3A's..."

    Yale accepts A levels but not IB
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    I do the A levels, and it is hard work, I can tell you. There are plenty of bright A level students at my school, and I am sure in other schools as well, so to discredit them by saying their A grades are less significant is harsh, in my opinion.
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    [QUOTE=dido]
    (Original post by ib too hard)
    i have heard from other people abt A - Levels.. plus universities give a better recognition to the IB than the A - Levels. for example in the US, even for admissions in the UK thru UCAS.. IB's 38 points is equal to 3A's..."

    Yale accepts A levels but not IB
    what? yale, and any ivy league for tha matter, will accept any student doing any kind of international educational system as long as they have the appropriate requirements, i.e SAT minimum score of.... and 2-3SAT2s with min score of... they don't really care about you takin IB or Alevels as long as you pass highschool ad get a GPA good enough to get you into their institute. Where did you get the idea yale doesn't accept IB?
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    [QUOTE=~Lc~]
    (Original post by dido)
    what? yale, and any ivy league for tha matter, will accept any student doing any kind of international educational system as long as they have the appropriate requirements, i.e SAT minimum score of.... and 2-3SAT2s with min score of... they don't really care about you takin IB or Alevels as long as you pass highschool ad get a GPA good enough to get you into their institute. Where did you get the idea yale doesn't accept IB?
    I should have said; Yale accepts A levels INSTEAD of SAT or ACT, but if you do IB you still have to take the US SAT or ACT entrance test. Look at their web-site. Of course, they may give credit for IB once you're in there.
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    Okay first let’s state the facts. I think that the quality of students who take A-levels is just as good as those who take IB (so therefore the numbers below are directly related to test difficulty).

    On average 7-8% of IB candidates get a 7 in a given subject.
    On average 15-20% of A-level candidates get As in a given subject.
    [and just to compare] about 30-40% of AP candidates get 5s in a given subject.

    The first thing that might go through your head is: “Hell, I’m going to take the easy way out and do A-levels!” WOOAH slow down. Top universities in England know that IB is a much harder and complete course than A-levels. By taking IB’s you will stand out in a pool of 30,000 A-level candidates. Nowadays, just about anybody can get an A in A-levels with minimal effort.

    Another fact that proves the point is that only 10% of AP-takers who apply to Stanford get accepted whereas a whooping 40% of IB takers who apply eventually get accepted. The statistics show that IB is in your best benefit.

    You might think I’m a bit biased so let me clarify things. I admit I am an overachiever, and I have a particular knack for mathematics. So in my sophomore year I took the Cambridge AS level mathematics and it was probably the easiest high-stakes test I’ve taken in my life. The questions were easy, and the grading curve is generous. To get an A grade in my A-level, all I have to do is get a B in the [very easy] third mechanics paper. I am also going to take the AP Calculus BC exam this year, and it is about 10 times harder than AS BUT the grading curve is 20 times more generous. You only need 60% correct in the AP Calculus BC exam to get a 5/5. Also, I am also midway in my IB program and it is probably the most difficult course of them all (no wonder 40% of applicants get accepted to Stanford). So I have actually done (or will do) exams from each the systems and from experience I can say that IB is definitely the most difficult but by the time you go to university I assure you it will pay off.
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    [QUOTE=Atomic22]
    On average 7-8% of IB candidates get a 7 in a given subject.
    On average 15-20% of A-level candidates get As in a given subject.
    [and just to compare] about 30-40% of AP candidates get 5s in a given subject.

    The first thing that might go through your head is: “Hell, I’m going to take the easy way out and do A-levels!” WOOAH slow down. Top universities in England know that IB is a much harder and complete course than A-levels. By taking IB’s you will stand out in a pool of 30,000 A-level candidates. Nowadays, just about anybody can get an A in A-levels with minimal effort.
    =/QUOTE]


    This is what I was saying re Oxbridge entrance - if they want you and you are doing A levels they will ask for 3As; if you are doing IB they will ask for 777/776 and 39/42 points over all. Which is more achievable? As you say - A levels.
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    @dido

    Is that IB score out of 45? Or did you mean 39-42 out of 45?

    Either way, I think that the most important thing is not getting into university but actually doing well in university and IB prepares students much more than IB. Maybe in UK universities its easier with A-levels but you better be damn sure you're going to get 3As (one B and you're screwd).

    But in American universities it is 10x times better to do IB than AP (or A-levels).

    Also sometimes even with you're predicted grades of 3As you won't get an offer because so many others have 3As.

    In IB, if you work it isn't so difficult to get 39/45. 39/42 is a different matter but it is still achievable if you have potential and are determined.
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    You have a point, Atomic22. If you are sure of the highest grades IB would stand out as diffferent, and maybe seen as "better". But if you think you just might manage 3 As at A level and a good interview...... Especially if you are not an all-rounder and fear your Maths, say, or English, grade would let you down in the overall score.
    As they say "horseS for courses"
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    ehmm 39-45 and 39-45 easy!?

    Hell no!

    well if you do 3 Languages and and geography and math studies (IGCSE LEVEL MATH), Environmental system.

    No way with Econ, B&M, History in Higher and math highrt or physics/chemistry/bilogy

    please go to pastpare thread in this forum and try to solve it
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    In some ways I'd wish I'd done IB. I don't like the fact I would have had to do a science instead of a second language, but I think I would have prefered the teaching. Like take psychology A-level. It's basically a memory test. No skill needed, just pure fact remembering (though there are a crazy amount of facts). Whereas I get the impression IB is a lot more discussion and actual thought, and less learning by heart, which would suit me better.
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    [QUOTE=dido]
    (Original post by ~Lc~)

    I should have said; Yale accepts A levels INSTEAD of SAT or ACT, but if you do IB you still have to take the US SAT or ACT entrance test. Look at their web-site. Of course, they may give credit for IB once you're in there.
    Yale doesn't accept A levels instead of SAT! all inbternational students require at least SAT or ACT hence what is written on the international admission page on collegeboard:
    "Tests for International Students

    * Required: SAT Reasoning Test and SAT Subject Tests; or ACT"
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    [QUOTE=~Lc~]
    (Original post by dido)
    Yale doesn't accept A levels instead of SAT! all inbternational students require at least SAT or ACT hence what is written on the international admission page on collegeboard:
    "Tests for International Students

    * Required: SAT Reasoning Test and SAT Subject Tests; or ACT"
    Oh yes they do!

    This is the page -

    http://www.yale.edu/admit/internatio...ion/index.html

    And this is a quote from it -

    "2. Students enrolled in A-level programs may use COMPLETED A-level results as a substitute for the SAT II Subject Tests on a one-for-one basis provided official test results arrive at Yale by February of 2007. Predicted A-level results may not be used as substitutions.

    *No other substitutions are acceptable."

    And thirdly, I emailed and asked.
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    I wasn't talkin about the SAT2s... I was talkin about the minimum requirement of the ACT or SAT reasoning! it says on the collegeboard page for yale that SAT2 is recomended not required! and I don't think they let any international student without at least a TOEFL or SATreasoning... A-level, IB or otherwise...
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    (Original post by ~Lc~)
    I wasn't talkin about the SAT2s... I was talkin about the minimum requirement of the ACT or SAT reasoning! it says on the collegeboard page for yale that SAT2 is recomended not required! and I don't think they let any international student without at least a TOEFL or SATreasoning... A-level, IB or otherwise...
    You could be right there!

    On the other hand MIDDLEBURY accept IB instead of SAT1

    "16:
    What kind of testing does Middlebury require?
    A:
    Middlebury’s revised testing policy reflects the changes to the SAT I, made by the College Board. Applicants must submit standardized tests in at least three different areas of study. Beginning with applicants graduating from secondary school in 2006, this requirement may be met by any one of the following three options:

    1) The ACT (preferably with the Writing Test)
    2) The new (three-part) SAT I
    3) Three tests in different subject areas chosen from the SAT II, Advanced Placement, or International Baccalaureate exams.

    Students choosing option 3 above may submit exam results that are all of one type (e.g., three SAT II s, three AP s, or three IB s) or may combine tests of different types (e.g., two SAT II s and one AP), as long as they represent three different areas of study.
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    I did the first year of IB, and i aint a bad student, i got 10A*, A, B in my gcses. But, i was sabotaged by 3 of the science teachers. There was this group 4 project, where I was given the 2 worst students in my class to work with. I did 90% of the project on my own since they would simply say piss off when I said lets do something. So, i get the lowest grade of a 3 in the entire school, and they get 4, and 5! I know the criteria are mainly working TOGETHER skills, but if the person doesnt want to work, what can u show? Especially if they get a higher grade that is ridiculous! I also noticed that IB was quite hard for me to get 7's on, due to the extremely low teacher's ability in my school, and ofcourse some of their baises.

    TO cut the long story short, I changed to A levles, having already takedn maths with an A, and I believe the sole problem with IB is the INTERNAL MARKING if u dont have support on your side. Also, i believe only exam taking is much more of a correct method of examination since it doesnt include subjective marking to that extent.

    However, I think IB is better for weak students, who can rely on internal assesement, and on EXTREMELY HARD WORKING students, who wanna test their limits. I am not htat hard working, so i think A levels is best for me.
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    I couldn't do A levels anyway, but I certainly like that I'm doing IB. ALthough the offer is a bit harder for the IB, it seems a lot more interesting and broader, which I like.
 
 
 

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