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    Ok, i am applying for med., but theres always a part of myself wondering is it a good idea for me, who is quite sensitive, to become a doctor.

    I mean I’ve made excuses saying this sensitivity could be useful in motivating me to work and aim higher, but am I deceiving myself?

    Do you understand what I mean? I’ve had the experience of losing some family members to illnesses, and obviously I was emotional during these times, but do you think being quite sensitive will inhibit being a good doctor?
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    Well you don't want to be some sort of emotionless robot, you want to have some feelings of empathy towards your patients, as this would improve your communication with them. But at the other extreme, you don't want to be too emotionally involved, at the end of the day you need to be able to switch off from your work and just chill out for a bit. It's all about a happy medium, and if you think that you are within this 'acceptable range' so to speak, then i wouldn't worry.
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    I am a pretty sensitive person (or at least I like to think I am) I have come accross patients so far whoes stories have really upset me. However you learn to deal with your feelings. I am absolutetly petrefied at the moment at the prospect of seeing someone die which unfortunately I think is probably going to happen during my first clinical year.

    My advice to you is to go for it, though somethings that you see are going to upset you, you willl adapt and learn to get through them.
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    I can empathize with the op, slightly worried that I may start crying over some poor patient, or does the training kick-in?
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    I feel the same. I'm quite sensitive and got quite upset on my first day at the nursing home where I work, but I think that you have to be able to cope with these feelings and not let them get in the way of what you are meant to be doing, whether it is comforting a resident, or as a doctor treating a patient. If you think that you could do that, then go for it, as doctors IMHO need to be able to empathise with their patients and there are some things that almost everyone will find upsetting.

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    things change. you'll toughen up. it's far better to be too sensitive to start with than insensitive.
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    (Original post by Connemara)
    I can empathize with the op, slightly worried that I may start crying over some poor patient, or does the training kick-in?
    You don't get trained on not crying! The important thing is to not let your emotions get in the way of what you're doing - running away from an arrest to cry in a corner is not going to win you Brownie points; crying in a corner after you've fulfilled all your duties and it still hasn't worked out is something everyone will probably do at some point.

    You will hear and see things that will shock you to the core and although everyone reacts in their own way, it's perfectly accepted that yes, some people will find it harder. But I wouldn't let "being too sensitive" be a reason not to do medicine; once you learn to handle it, it'll make you a better doctor.
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    Eek!! I don't think that I would go and blub in the corner in an emergency situation,it's just that when on work-experience in children's clinic I had to go and weep in the loo after the session due to sitting in with a Consultant who was dealing with a seriously neglected baby.
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    (Original post by Kikiwi)
    Ok, i am applying for med., but theres always a part of myself wondering is it a good idea for me, who is quite sensitive, to become a doctor.

    I mean I’ve made excuses saying this sensitivity could be useful in motivating me to work and aim higher, but am I deceiving myself?

    Do you understand what I mean? I’ve had the experience of losing some family members to illnesses, and obviously I was emotional during these times, but do you think being quite sensitive will inhibit being a good doctor?
    Even doctors have emotions. :p: I've had lectures on communication with patients and how it's important to be empathetic without becoming too emotionally attached. During your medical course (if you apply successfully) you'll be taught how to cope with difficult situations and what's appropriate before you're let loose .
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    Just had 4 hours on Breaking Bad News. So bloody hard to get it right.
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    (Original post by Helenia)
    Just had 4 hours on Breaking Bad News. So bloody hard to get it right.
    we had a session on that last year with actors it was really hard. You never know how someone is going to react. The thing that we were told that I thought was an interesting thing to think about was that something that you might not think to be particually bad news might be devistating for the patient.
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    im sensitive, i think it's a good thing. even if you get upset sometimes, you learn how to cope with things and i dont think youll find hard parts worse than anyone else.

    my worry about med school is when thinking about someone elses pain, i nearly feel it myself. if that makes sense. if i see a person with their hand chopped off, ill clutch my own and imagine that pain, and probably feel slightly sick.
    A & E probably not for me, but looking forward to the experience of med school :P
    IF i get in.
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    (Original post by Saffie)
    things change. you'll toughen up. it's far better to be too sensitive to start with than insensitive.
    I hope I don't become too cyanical to be a doctor... Sometimes we do such pointless things on my course... but today was so damn pointless - it was beyond a joke... we had to fill in tick box forms about ourselves and 8 other people in our group... The reason for doing this was because we needed to 'practise how to do peer assessments when we are doing our clinicals'... i mean ffs... it was just a simple tick box form - why the hell do we have to practice filling out tick box forms?... it was such a joke...
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    (Original post by oxygenbubbles)
    During your medical course (if you apply successfully) you'll be taught how to cope with difficult situations and what's appropriate before you're let loose .
    ..and then you meet the real thing on the wards.

    You can not teach this sort of thing, and it's something that you have to get use to and draw your own boundaries based on what you are comfortable with...

    It's when you stop caring you have to worry...
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    (Original post by cowsgomoo)
    im sensitive, i think it's a good thing. even if you get upset sometimes, you learn how to cope with things and i dont think youll find hard parts worse than anyone else.

    my worry about med school is when thinking about someone elses pain, i nearly feel it myself. if that makes sense. if i see a person with their hand chopped off, ill clutch my own and imagine that pain, and probably feel slightly sick.
    A & E probably not for me, but looking forward to the experience of med school :P
    IF i get in.
    You'll also find everytime you learn about a new illness, you start to see the symptoms appearing in yourself. When you learn about something, it's amazing how many people think they have that illness the next day. :p:
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    (Original post by oxygenbubbles)
    You'll also find everytime you learn about a new illness, you start to see the symptoms appearing in yourself. When you learn about something, it's amazing how many people think they have that illness the next day. :p:
    OMG Yeah! When I read through my Dorling Kindersley family health guide , I start thinking I have all the illnesses in there. Like pain near heart = blah and I go ahhhhhhhhhhh!
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    I've diagnosed myself with all sorts of fun things. Currently I'm worried about the necrotising fasciitis in my throat, but last week it was MRSA.
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    I've 'had' TB three times and have only just spontaneously recovered from my last brain tumour.

    Currently worried about vCJD, although I'm sure my memory lapses are just extreme tiredness, which, in relation to the original post in this thread is fantastic for deadening your emotions!
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    Lol
 
 
 
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