Turn on thread page Beta
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Yer that sounds like mild OCD to me. I've got it as well, pretty much to the same degree as you. My mum's a GP so i described the things i do to her and she confirmed that it was mild OCD. However, she said that its only if the obsessions begin to have a serious impact on your life (for example spending several hours on rituals each day, or is causing you not to be able to function properly or carry out certain things) that you would need councilling and/or medication. As i said, my OCD is pretty much as severe as yours (repeatedly checking things, making sure i've locked things, making sure things are lined up "just so", etc) and my mum said that it's something i'm probably just going to have to live with. She said that it would get worse during stressful times (and it did - it was really bad during GCSEs), but otherwise for me it's just something that is extremely annoying and at times very time consuming. But anyway, go to your GP, they may say something different.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Hi there. Lately I seem to be developing some kind of obsessive compulsive behaviour, which seems to be getting worse and worse each day.
    It all started when I got my first car, and I'd often get out, lock the door, walk away for a bit, then walk back to double check I actually locked it.
    A year later, this has developed into double checking my handbrake is on, lights are off, car is in gear, windows are up, and multiple checks that the doors are locked.
    It has also expanded to other areas too, like at school, I'll log off my computer and walk away, then come back to make sure I've actually logged off correctly. At home, I'll be extremely paranoid about not setting the house alarm, or not properly locking the front door - even when I double checked it all at the time. This also happens with closing the fridge or microwave door, and now switching off things in my room before I leave.

    Why is this happening? It surely cant be normal at all ....

    I've now checked 3-4 times that I ticked anonymous, and i'm going to check one more time before I click submit =(.

    hehe I actually never thought I had an OCD until my boyfriend pointed it out....I have to have everything clean and tidy and if it isn't i'll go and do it and make sure it's to my 'standard' as such lol!!!! but erm yeah my boyfriend pointed this out to me a few months before my 18th birthday so yeah it's not usually noticed for a little while
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    im a bit compulsive when i get out of bed, i have to get out of bed on the right side, even if im gonna get straight back in. If i get out on the left i have to get back in and get out the other side lol. i can safely say that in 19 years, ive never got out of bed on the "wrong side".
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I used to be like this as well! Before I went to bed, I'd have to line everything up on my desk in a square and then I'd get into bed and have to get up and check it again. I also used to lock the front door, get halfway to the bus stop and have to come back and check it even though I KNEW it was locked. It went away when we moved out of my mum's boyfriend's house so I reckon it was due to living in a stressful place!
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    mines gone away since comming to uni - but thats probably because the (wrong) side of the bed is now up against a wall!
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Hi there. Lately I seem to be developing some kind of obsessive compulsive behaviour, which seems to be getting worse and worse each day.
    It all started when I got my first car, and I'd often get out, lock the door, walk away for a bit, then walk back to double check I actually locked it.
    A year later, this has developed into double checking my handbrake is on, lights are off, car is in gear, windows are up, and multiple checks that the doors are locked.
    It has also expanded to other areas too, like at school, I'll log off my computer and walk away, then come back to make sure I've actually logged off correctly. At home, I'll be extremely paranoid about not setting the house alarm, or not properly locking the front door - even when I double checked it all at the time. This also happens with closing the fridge or microwave door, and now switching off things in my room before I leave.

    Why is this happening? It surely cant be normal at all ....

    I've now checked 3-4 times that I ticked anonymous, and i'm going to check one more time before I click submit =(.
    Don't worry about it. Even if it is OCD, it can sometime be a situation that you can grow out of.

    As already said, it just seems like you are obsessive about the things that really matter to you. The only real advice if perhaps find some forums online where you can discuss the problem with people who are in a similar situation as you.

    But its really nothing to worry about, just try and make a few conscious efforts to change your ways as best you can. And learn to let things go as well, whatever happens happens!

    Dont worry about it, and try and realise that all the things you are worrying about are material goods, and that if something bad is going to happen with your property then it will happen.

    Good luck.. and try and chill out, put things into perspective
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: October 20, 2006
Poll
Black Friday: Yay or Nay?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.