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Edexcel A2 History - Germany 1900-45 - Monday 8th June 2015 [Exam Discussion Thread] Watch

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    (Original post by CD223)
    My teacher has said it's extremely likely due to how self-contained it is in the syllabus and the fact that it hasn't come up (to my knowledge).


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    Yeah I agree that it's pretty likely. Definitely one of the main more 'obvious' questions that hasn't yet appeared. Could easily do a 'to what extent is X the main cause of Nazi consolidation of power in the years ....'
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    (Original post by tggfootymad)
    Yeah I agree that it's pretty likely. Definitely one of the main more 'obvious' questions that hasn't yet appeared. Could easily do a 'to what extent is X the main cause of Nazi consolidation of power in the years ....'
    Yeah that sounds a likely question - either that or "how successful was nazi consolidation of power in the years..."


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    How has everyone been revising for this exam? I'm a bit undecided on how best to revise... I think I might order the 'myrevisionnotes' book soon though
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    (Original post by pearl_rose)
    How has everyone been revising for this exam? I'm a bit undecided on how best to revise... I think I might order the 'myrevisionnotes' book soon though
    Can't recommend that book highly enough!
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    (Original post by pearl_rose)
    How has everyone been revising for this exam? I'm a bit undecided on how best to revise... I think I might order the 'myrevisionnotes' book soon though
    Doing past papers for my teacher to mark (only 2 students in class) and answering the key questions in the Collier and Layton books, as well as mindmaps for the different periods and possible exam questions.
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    (Original post by WilliamSlim)
    Doing past papers for my teacher to mark (only 2 students in class) and answering the key questions in the Collier and Layton books, as well as mindmaps for the different periods and possible exam questions.
    Collier and Layton are both good. Have you also heard of the Hite and Hinton book?


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    I just tried to answer the controversy question for B From June 2011 for homework, and at 750 words it translates into just under 3 sides written out by hand. The teacher tells us the goal is about 5 or 6 sides -- I can't believe how little I have to say about this haha. PLEEEENTY of room for improvement it seems
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    (Original post by cuppa)
    I just tried to answer the controversy question for B From June 2011 for homework, and at 750 words it translates into just under 3 sides written out by hand. The teacher tells us the goal is about 5 or 6 sides -- I can't believe how little I have to say about this haha. PLEEEENTY of room for improvement it seems
    It is a hard paper! Don't give up


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    (Original post by CD223)
    Can't recommend that book highly enough!
    Ikr! It was so good for AS. Do you memorize the entire book? I think I might copy things out on to flash cards but I feel like that might be a waste of time.. idk
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    (Original post by WilliamSlim)
    Doing past papers for my teacher to mark (only 2 students in class) and answering the key questions in the Collier and Layton books, as well as mindmaps for the different periods and possible exam questions.
    Cool I like that idea of mindmaps.. I also would make exam question plans in spider diagram form.. and then use that to revise in case a similar question comes up.. How do you normally plan your answers?
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    Is there a general essay structure for the part b controversy question? I'm struggling a bit with structuring my answers. Is 3 main paragraphs covering the main arguments raised in the sources an ok way to do it, with an intro and conclusion too? What does everyone else recommend? Would welcome advice!
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    (Original post by pearl_rose)
    Ikr! It was so good for AS. Do you memorize the entire book? I think I might copy things out on to flash cards but I feel like that might be a waste of time.. idk
    I do flash cards. Time consuming but worth it!


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    (Original post by tggfootymad)
    Is there a general essay structure for the part b controversy question? I'm struggling a bit with structuring my answers. Is 3 main paragraphs covering the main arguments raised in the sources an ok way to do it, with an intro and conclusion too? What does everyone else recommend? Would welcome advice!
    I tend to go source by source and do two paragraphs on the two sources that are comparatively weaker, why that is, how they cross refer to other sources etc, then do a third para on the best or most convincing source. With an intro and conclusion.


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    Can someone please help me with this question? Thanks x


    To what extent was the Second Reich an entrenched autocracy?
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    (Original post by Bunny2014)
    Can someone please help me with this question? Thanks x


    To what extent was the Second Reich an entrenched autocracy?
    The Second Reich was entrenched authoritarian state, however this became less of a case as time progressed from 1900-1914 in Wilhelmine Germany. It is clear that over time the German Reich was shaped by the personal influence and prestige of the Kaiser – whether this be through the structure of the federal state itself or the dominance of Prussian elites over the 1871 constitution, fundamentally there lay a subservience to the influence of the Kaiser.

    It is important to note that the Kaiserreich was very socially and politically complicated. Whilst Kaiser Wilhelm II was enthusiast for new technology, new industries and creating a new world role for Germany through the nationalistic policies of Weltpolitik and Flottenpolitik, he and his imperial government had to work within the constitutional framework set out in 1871. Citizens enjoyed civil liberties such as a Reichsstaat (state under a rule of laws), freedom of expression, press and assembly and all men over 25 had universal suffrage – which brought with it a broader franchise than Britain and France had until 1918. Though for the most part it was deemed constitutionally powerless, the Reichstag could not be ignored as it had power to endorse or reject legislation initiated by imperial government (such as the important finance bills). As Germany industrialised and urbanised, the amount of legislation discussed in the Reichstag increased, giving it a greater platform to debate and contest policies. The turn out to Reichstag elections actually increased by 50% to nearly 82% in 1912 demonstrating that Germany’s population no longer saw it as a meaningless institution.

    Pre-1914 Germany was a sophisticated, developed and highly-educated society, but this did not chance the fact that ultimately from 1897-1908, Chancellor von Bulow would flatter the Kaiser and promote his views in order to stay in his role. This meant that the constitution remained fundamentally weakened in several ways. The Kaiser continued to retain his power to appoint chancellor and his ministers and the chancellor was not accountable to the Reichstag, allowing Bethmann-Holloweg to survive a vote of no confidence in 1913. The Federal structure was also unfair and undemocratic. Prussia covered two-thirds of Germany yet had 3 class electoral system that manipulated the seats gained based on the amount of tax paid. In this respect, Prussia continued to block any change in the Bundesrat. This, coupled with a lack of will by political parties to take responsibility to bringing about changes regressed the pace of change in Wilhelmine Germany. All parties seemed to distance themselves from the Social Democrats – conservatives saw them as anathema, but even middle classes were scared of their influence and refused to cooperate as they feared that their ideas of constitutional reform may lead to radical reforms. Secondly, parties tended to act more like interest groups than actual political parties, acting for the people who voted for them and not common good of the country regardless of class. Finally, the prestige and status of Kaiser still deeply integrated in minds of many Reichstag deputies who actively supported Weltpolitik - therefore balance of power still rested with conservatives - although their right to govern was increasingly under threat from definite forces of economic and political change.

    Overall, 1914 Imperial Germany was not ungovernable, partly because of its economic well-being and respect for the monarchy but there was a political stalemate – fundamental change did not seem imminent. Although there is evidence of a growing feeling of parliamentary democracy, monarchical system was strongly upheld and supported by powerful groups that existed at the time.
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    (Original post by CD223)
    The Second Reich was entrenched authoritarian state, however this became less of a case as time progressed from 1900-1914 in Wilhelmine Germany. It is clear that over time the German Reich was shaped by the personal influence and prestige of the Kaiser – whether this be through the structure of the federal state itself or the dominance of Prussian elites over the 1871 constitution, fundamentally there lay a subservience to the influence of the Kaiser.

    It is important to note that the Kaiserreich was very socially and politically complicated. Whilst Kaiser Wilhelm II was enthusiast for new technology, new industries and creating a new world role for Germany through the nationalistic policies of Weltpolitik and Flottenpolitik, he and his imperial government had to work within the constitutional framework set out in 1871. Citizens enjoyed civil liberties such as a Reichsstaat (state under a rule of laws), freedom of expression, press and assembly and all men over 25 had universal suffrage – which brought with it a broader franchise than Britain and France had until 1918. Though for the most part it was deemed constitutionally powerless, the Reichstag could not be ignored as it had power to endorse or reject legislation initiated by imperial government (such as the important finance bills). As Germany industrialised and urbanised, the amount of legislation discussed in the Reichstag increased, giving it a greater platform to debate and contest policies. The turn out to Reichstag elections actually increased by 50% to nearly 82% in 1912 demonstrating that Germany’s population no longer saw it as a meaningless institution.

    Pre-1914 Germany was a sophisticated, developed and highly-educated society, but this did not chance the fact that ultimately from 1897-1908, Chancellor von Bulow would flatter the Kaiser and promote his views in order to stay in his role. This meant that the constitution remained fundamentally weakened in several ways. The Kaiser continued to retain his power to appoint chancellor and his ministers and the chancellor was not accountable to the Reichstag, allowing Bethmann-Holloweg to survive a vote of no confidence in 1913. The Federal structure was also unfair and undemocratic. Prussia covered two-thirds of Germany yet had 3 class electoral system that manipulated the seats gained based on the amount of tax paid. In this respect, Prussia continued to block any change in the Bundesrat. This, coupled with a lack of will by political parties to take responsibility to bringing about changes regressed the pace of change in Wilhelmine Germany. All parties seemed to distance themselves from the Social Democrats – conservatives saw them as anathema, but even middle classes were scared of their influence and refused to cooperate as they feared that their ideas of constitutional reform may lead to radical reforms. Secondly, parties tended to act more like interest groups than actual political parties, acting for the people who voted for them and not common good of the country regardless of class. Finally, the prestige and status of Kaiser still deeply integrated in minds of many Reichstag deputies who actively supported Weltpolitik - therefore balance of power still rested with conservatives - although their right to govern was increasingly under threat from definite forces of economic and political change.

    Overall, 1914 Imperial Germany was not ungovernable, partly because of its economic well-being and respect for the monarchy but there was a political stalemate – fundamental change did not seem imminent. Although there is evidence of a growing feeling of parliamentary democracy, monarchical system was strongly upheld and supported by powerful groups that existed at the time.
    Thank you so much x
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    (Original post by Bunny2014)
    Thank you so much x
    That's okay! Hope it helps - had to do that essay as homework haha!
    How's your revision going?
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    (Original post by CD223)
    That's okay! Hope it helps - had to do that essay as homework haha!
    How's your revision going?
    Its okay, not done a huge amount of essays ect

    How about you?
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    (Original post by Bunny2014)
    Its okay, not done a huge amount of essays ect

    How about you?
    Oh right! I don't write essays to revise haha! I just go over essay structure and plans and course content, making flash cards and resources as I go. I find essay writing time consuming :/
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    (Original post by CD223)
    Oh right! I don't write essays to revise haha! I just go over essay structure and plans and course content, making flash cards and resources as I go. I find essay writing time consuming :/

    Thats a good idea, what do you think the exam is likely to be on?

    I think probably Nazi consolidation of power but not sure about the other question
 
 
 
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