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    (Original post by samb1234)
    That is quite sneaky as really this is a physics question. That diagram is called an electronic energy level diagram. Basically the way the diagram works is that at n=1 the attraction is the strongest and at n=infinity there is no attraction. Therefore if you want to move the electron from n =1 to n=infinity you have to provide it with that much energy.

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    To be fair,they do it in chemistry but in a sneaky way.Take a closer look at the diagram from my chemistry book.
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    (Original post by samb1234)
    That is quite sneaky as really this is a physics question. That diagram is called an electronic energy level diagram. Basically the way the diagram works is that at n=1 the attraction is the strongest and at n=infinity there is no attraction. Therefore if you want to move the electron from n =1 to n=infinity you have to provide it with that much energy.

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    I'm upset we don't do orbitals in physics.They are the quantum mechanical version of the bohr model.
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    (Original post by BBeyond)
    oh that makes sense cheers, so if it was electron affinity it would be from infinity to n=1?
    Btw if you didn't know these diagrams also explain why you get black lines on an emission spectra. I won't go into much detail but the wavelength, and hence colour of a photon (light 'particle') is related to its energy. When an electron loses energy (ie moves down 1 or more levels) a photon of the difference in energy is released. Because the levels are discrete, there are some energies the emitted photon can never have so some wavelengths you will never get

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    (Original post by Dinaa)
    Banned lol =)

    HOW HAVE YOU BEEENN!!!!!? stranger :erm:
    Why were you banned lol
    stranger's been good yup :ahee:


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    (Original post by Kadak)
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    Wow,cruel exam board.Energy levels is a physics concept,I think that's is what is called orbitals in chemistry.
    Energy level is called energy level or shell in chemistry lol
    Orbital is a region in which there is a high probability of finding one or two electrons.

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    (Original post by C0balt)
    Energy level is called energy level or shell in chemistry lol
    Orbital is a region in which there is a high probability of finding one or two electrons.

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    (Original post by samb1234)
    Oh yeah I had forgotten there were some simple ones in c2 as I've mainly been doing c3 recently where there are a huge number of trig identities. In answer to your question you would see black lines on the spectrum. Do you do physics?

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    Oh dear :sad:

    I hate Trig identities so much, ugh C3 has more :cry2:


    Also, wth lol how am I suppose to know that? Nope I don't
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    Hey guys,
    I'm confused..
    how come in enthalpy change questions, they sometimes give you enthalpy of formation data in a table, and then ask you to calculate the enthalpy of combustion?

    I don't understand..what do I do?
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    (Original post by wednesday_adams)
    Hey guys,
    I'm confused..
    how come in enthalpy change questions, they sometimes give you enthalpy of formation data in a table, and then ask you to calculate the enthalpy of combustion?

    I don't understand..what do I do?
    Combustion is
    Sum of enthalpy of reactants - sum of enthalpy of products


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    (Original post by Dinaa)
    Oh dear :sad:

    I hate Trig identities so much, ugh C3 has more :cry2:


    Also, wth lol how am I suppose to know that? Nope I don't
    Yep c3 has too much trig what with double angle formulas, 3 new trig things cot sec cosec etc etc. Basically all you need to know is that when you heat something the electrons will gain energy and will move to a higher energy level. When they lose energy and move back down, they emit a photon (light particle) with as much energy as they have just lost. The wavelength (and hence colour) of a photon is related to its energy. These energy levels are discrete so only photons of certain energies and hence wavelength can be emitted, meaning that you get black lines on the spectrum where nothing was emitted

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    Hai der :ahee:

    The effect of light on Silver Nitrates:

    The precipitates, except AgI(s), darken in sunlight forming silver. This reaction is used in photography to form the dark bits on photographic film.

    OK but questions:

    WHY do they darken in sunlight?
    Is there an equation for this?
    Why can't AgI(s) darken?

    curious :mmm:
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    bump diddy bump bump
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    (Original post by Dinaa)
    Hai der :ahee:

    The effect of light on Silver Nitrates:

    The precipitates, except AgI(s), darken in sunlight forming silver. This reaction is used in photography to form the dark bits on photographic film.

    OK but questions:

    WHY do they darken in sunlight?
    Is there an equation for this?
    Why can't AgI(s) darken?

    curious :mmm:
    They decompose to leave Ag (s)
    I googled before and it said it darkens but my teacher said no lol

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    (Original post by C0balt)
    They decompose to leave Ag (s)
    I googled before and it said it darkens but my teacher said no lol

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    Why would your teacher say that?

    It does darken right?

    And lol ofc that makes sense! Thanks
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    (Original post by Dinaa)
    Why would your teacher say that?

    It does darken right?

    And lol ofc that makes sense! Thanks
    Idk he said AgI doesn't darken :dontknow:

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    (Original post by C0balt)
    Idk he said AgI doesn't darken :dontknow:

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    Yeah it doesn't

    I was asking why it doesn't
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    (Original post by Dinaa)
    Yeah it doesn't

    I was asking why it doesn't
    I don't know
    I googled and Wikipedia had equation of photodecposition of AgI lol

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    (Original post by C0balt)
    I don't know
    I googled and Wikipedia had equation of photodecposition of AgI lol

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    Oh, I guess it's something I don't need to know hah :angelblush:

    Thanks though b :hugs:
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    Magnesium and Berylium react with H2SO4 to produce MgSO4 + H2, but
    Calcium, Strontium and Barium with Dilute H2SO4, is a little more complicated.

    Is this what happens or what you'd say happens:

    Calcium, Strontium and Barium Sulphates are thought to be insoluble, hence a layer of insoluble sulphate will form, causing the reaction to slow down or stop completely.

    So, does these group 2 elements not react with Dilute H2SO4?

    It would produce a white precipitate and H2 bubbles.
    What is the equation for the reaction?

    Thank you
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    (Original post by Dinaa)
    Magnesium and Berylium react with H2SO4 to produce MgSO4 + H2, but
    Calcium, Strontium and Barium with Dilute H2SO4, is a little more complicated.

    Is this what happens or what you'd say happens:

    Calcium, Strontium and Barium Sulphates are thought to be insoluble, hence a layer of insoluble sulphate will form, causing the reaction to slow down or stop completely.

    So, does these group 2 elements not react with Dilute H2SO4?

    It would produce a white precipitate and H2 bubbles.
    What is the equation for the reaction?

    Thank you
    It reacts initially but it stops
    Ba(s)+H2SO4(aq)--->BaSO4(s)+H2
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