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    Hi can somebody explain ionisation energies I'm very confused and struggling to understand it.
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    (Original post by kandykissesxox)
    Hi can somebody explain ionisation energies I'm very confused and struggling to understand it.
    Was just watching this video - its good. hope it helps

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PNZV862SN6Q
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    (Original post by 123pickles)
    Need help with question 5(g) - AQA Unit 1 June 2013.

    Which one of the first, second or third ionisations of thallium produces an ion with the election configuration [Xe] 5d10 6s1?

    The answer is second - i understand why it is second but how can you to do without writing the whole configuration of thallium out as the question is only worth one mark.
    Is that even correct?
    [Xe]4f14 5d10 6s2 6p1 is thallium

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    (Original post by C0balt)
    Is that even correct?
    [Xe]4f14 5d10 6s2 6p1 is thallium

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    Thats what the question says
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    (Original post by C0balt)
    Is that even correct?
    [Xe]4f14 5d10 6s2 6p1 is thallium

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    the 2+ ion is [Xe]4f14 5d10 6s1 why have they've left out the 4f14
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    (Original post by kandykissesxox)
    Hi can somebody explain ionisation energies I'm very confused and struggling to understand it.
    Hi. Perhaps have a look at this - I am afraid I have never used these myself but some of my friends find them useful

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ywqg...w&spfreload=10
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    (Original post by 123pickles)
    Thats what the question says
    It looks like they may have made an error on that question
    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...2360876&page=9
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    (Original post by 123pickles)
    the 2+ ion is [Xe]4f14 5d10 6s1 why have they've left out the 4f14
    I didn't see the question

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    (Original post by c0balt)
    i didn't see the question

    posted from tsr mobile
    join asap ocr as chemistry study group
    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/g/st...cr_a_chemistry
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    (Original post by moneymania999)
    join asap ocr as chemistry study group
    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/g/st...cr_a_chemistry
    I don't do ocr

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    why does sulfur have a lower 1st ionization energy than phosphorus?
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    (Original post by allysid123)
    why does sulfur have a lower 1st ionization energy than phosphorus?
    Sulphur has a paired electron in p orbital and the repulsion between the electrons make it easier to remove the electron

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    (Original post by allysid123)
    why does sulfur have a lower 1st ionization energy than phosphorus?
    Sulfur has paired electrons in the 3p sub-shell which causes electron repulsion consequently resulting in a lower first IE than phosphorus.
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    (Original post by C0balt)
    Sulphur has a paired electron in p orbital and the repulsion between the electrons make it easier to remove the electron

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    lol ditto
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    (Original post by Joshthemathmo)
    lol ditto
    :sexface:

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    Great minds think alike
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    Hey guys, was wondering if any of you could answer this:

    Okay, so I don't really get what permanent dipole interactions are. Are they between oppositely charged dipoles of atoms of polar bonds between molecules?

    2. Between which atoms of separate molecules do permanent dipole forces occur between? For example, in Ethanal (CH2OH) is the permanent dipole between the oxygen and the carbon atom on the next molecule, or the oxygen and one of the hydrogens on the next molecule, and why?

    also, in CH3Cl which atoms is the permanent dipole between?

    Thanks a lot!!!
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    (Original post by annie79)
    Hey guys, was wondering if any of you could answer this:

    Okay, so I don't really get what permanent dipole interactions are. Are they between oppositely charged dipoles of atoms of polar bonds between molecules?

    2. Between which atoms of separate molecules do permanent dipole forces occur between? For example, in Ethanal (CH2OH) is the permanent dipole between the oxygen and the carbon atom on the next molecule, or the oxygen and one of the hydrogens on the next molecule, and why?

    also, in CH3Cl which atoms is the permanent dipole between?

    Thanks a lot!!!
    Permanent dipole attraction is between molecules.

    Take hydrogen chloride. Chlorine
    is more electronegative than hydrogen, so chlorine becomes slightly negative and hydrogen slightly positive. The negative part of the molecule, chlorine, is then attracted to hydrogen of another hydrogen chloride molecule because hydrogen is slightly positive.

    Ethanal's electronegative atom, oxygen, is attached directly to carbon atom so carbon becomes slightly positive and oxygen slightly negative so it's between carbon and oxygen.
    Chlorine and carbon likewise but tbh carbon is more electronegative than hydrogen so hydrogen become a slightly positive anyways, it doesn't really matter i think

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    (Original post by annie79)
    Hey guys, was wondering if any of you could answer this:

    Okay, so I don't really get what permanent dipole interactions are. Are they between oppositely charged dipoles of atoms of polar bonds between molecules?

    2. Between which atoms of separate molecules do permanent dipole forces occur between? For example, in Ethanal (CH2OH) is the permanent dipole between the oxygen and the carbon atom on the next molecule, or the oxygen and one of the hydrogens on the next molecule, and why?

    also, in CH3Cl which atoms is the permanent dipole between?

    Thanks a lot!!!
    It's caused by a bond becoming polarised due to the large difference in electronegativity between two atoms. H-Cl----H-Cl for example has a permanent dipole. There is a attraction between the delta plus H and delta negative Cl, so essentially yes.

    In the example the oxygen is attracted to anything with a positive charge, so in this case it'd be the carbonyl carbon! In chloromethane the dipole is between the Cl and C
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    (Original post by C0balt)
    Permanent dipole attraction is between molecules.

    Take hydrogen chloride. Chlorine
    is more electronegative than hydrogen, so chlorine becomes slightly negative and hydrogen slightly positive. The negative part of the molecule, chlorine, is then attracted to hydrogen of another hydrogen chloride molecule because hydrogen is slightly positive.

    Ethanal's electronegative atom, oxygen, is attached directly to carbon atom so carbon becomes slightly positive and oxygen slightly negative so it's between carbon and oxygen.
    Chlorine and carbon likewise but tbh carbon is more electronegative than hydrogen so hydrogen become a slightly positive anyways, it doesn't really matter i think

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Thanks a lot, so..in CH3Cl if it asks which atoms the permanent dipole is between, they'd most probably give the electronegativity values in a table or something so you'd know whether it is hydrogen or carbon that is the delta positive atom, right?
 
 
 
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