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    (Original post by alifleih)
    I guess I have to say it: I hate chemistry. Not because it's hard. I just do not understand or comprehend it. I seriously HATE the language of it too. Coulombs, newtons, kg/ms, atoms, potassium chloride, dumb prefixes and suffixes, etc.

    How can I make myself more comfortable with chemistry to know its basics and its language? It's truly crucial to me for an exam!
    Um, half of those words don't appear in Chemistry. Also, with the pre/suffixes, learning a small amount of knowledge leads to being able to work out alot.
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    (Original post by alifleih)
    I guess I have to say it: I hate chemistry. Not because it's hard. I just do not understand or comprehend it. I seriously HATE the language of it too. Coulombs, newtons, kg/ms, atoms, potassium chloride, dumb prefixes and suffixes, etc.

    How can I make myself more comfortable with chemistry to know its basics and its language? It's truly crucial to me for an exam!
    It seems that your main grudge is with Physics.


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    If you're wondering, 'How do I revise for Chemistry?'

    This is what I done:

    Firstly, I used the CGP textbook. Of course, CGP is simplified, but it's great to start with! I took notes from CGP and tbh It was pretty easy and Answered all the questions from the topic I'm weak in. 'Bondin' btw
    Then, from my notes on CGP, I bought revision cards (sainsbury's ones are great btw :cool:) and I was only bothered to make them for Organics, because I had a test on it. Got 26/30 btw.
    So, after using CGP, I used the textbook given to me from my school. 'Edexcel Chemistry by Ann Fullick'. This is more in depth and can look daunting to ascertain, but really, you should be familiar with most of the content. Minority of the data should be unfamiliar. Make extra notes on the things that you didn't know. I made notes on everything tbh, because I'm extra, but it wasn't too bad. Answered all the exam questions as well. BUT, I did miss out bonding.. It's just so boring to look at, serious.
    I had completed a past paper too, (hadn't revised Bonding, or been taught it properly too). Got 69/80, and lost most marks on the questions to do with bonding
    I forced myself today, to go through bonding from CGP, and realised that we haven't been taught most of it, which is probably why I found it frustratingly annoying
    But, tbh it really is quite simple.

    What I am going to do now is, make quick notes on bonding from the Ann Fullick text book, then flashcards! And MAYBE voice notes. Finally, bust out all the past papers available!

    When doing past papers, I do it strictly and get it marked properly. Or if I mark it myself, I make sure I'm strict.
    I highlight all the questions that I haven't achieved full marks in, even if it is 5/6, I'd highlight.
    First, I'd try to understand it, using the mark scheme and textbooks. If I still do not understand why I didn't get full marks, I'll go and ask a teacher!

    Hope this helped!
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    Does anyone do CCEA chemistry..
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    (Original post by Dylann)
    In what context? What's the topic?
    It's to do with structure and bonding changes across the periodic table.
    In my revising guide it says that chlorine and argon do not react with oxygen :dontknow: I don't understand why. :no::no:

    I suppose that the reason for argon is because it has a full outer shell.

    I just don't understand why chlorine would not react with oxygen.

    Would it be because chlorine need only 1 electron to fill it's outer shell but oxygen goes around in pairs so has 2 atoms? Therefore it isn't the correct number of atoms to fill chlorine's outer shell (due to there being to many)?





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    (Original post by diana99)
    It's to do with structure and bonding changes across the periodic table.
    In my revising guide it says that chlorine and argon do not react with oxygen :dontknow: I don't understand why. :no::no:

    I suppose that the reason for argon is because it has a full outer shell.

    I just don't understand why chlorine would not react with oxygen.

    Would it be because chlorine need only 1 electron to fill it's outer shell but oxygen goes around in pairs so has 2 atoms? Therefore it isn't the correct number of atoms to fill chlorine's outer shell (due to there being to many)?





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    Apparently energy problem :dontknow:
    https://answers.yahoo.com/question/?...0080556AAzlNht

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    (Original post by langlitz)
    So it reacts with ozone? Not O2 then? And you need chlorine as a free radical... So it's not chlorine reacting with oxygen at all...?


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    This slide has it all

    http://www.slideshare.net/menmaatre....zone-depletion
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    (Original post by diana99)
    It's to do with structure and bonding changes across the periodic table.
    In my revising guide it says that chlorine and argon do not react with oxygen :dontknow: I don't understand why. :no::no:

    I suppose that the reason for argon is because it has a full outer shell.

    I just don't understand why chlorine would not react with oxygen.

    Would it be because chlorine need only 1 electron to fill it's outer shell but oxygen goes around in pairs so has 2 atoms? Therefore it isn't the correct number of atoms to fill chlorine's outer shell (due to there being to many)?





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    I have no idea but the post above about energy seems to make sense. Also, you should be aware that some elements (like chlorine) are in fact able to have more than 8 electrons in their outer shell. The compound PCl5 is a well-known chlorinating agent and the phosphorus has 10 outer electrons. This is because in the 3rd period, elements now have a d-orbital which can hold an additional 10 electrons to the previous 2 and 6 made available by the S and P orbitals

    ClO2 is another example
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    Hello, got a little question about electron configuration.
    In the textbook it has the diagrams (boxes) and each arrow = electron. But here it shows the downwards electron first, but when I googled- the upwards electron was first ?!
    Does it matter, or is one correct?
    Thanks
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    (Original post by Ruineth)
    Hello, got a little question about electron configuration.
    In the textbook it has the diagrams (boxes) and each arrow = electron. But here it shows the downwards electron first, but when I googled- the upwards electron was first ?!
    Does it matter, or is one correct?
    Thanks
    Doesn't matter, just means they're opposite

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    (Original post by Dylann)
    Doesn't matter, just means they're opposite

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    Ah thank you!
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    (Original post by Ruineth)
    Hello, got a little question about electron configuration.
    In the textbook it has the diagrams (boxes) and each arrow = electron. But here it shows the downwards electron first, but when I googled- the upwards electron was first ?!
    Does it matter, or is one correct?
    Thanks
    As far as I have seen throughout chemistry, the convention is to write the up arrow first. In fact I've never seen it the other way around actually


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    Cheers, I think they mentioned all that in our lectures last year. But still that's ozone not oxygen


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    Feel like i've joined this thread a bit late, but I'm doing OCR A. I have my F321 Mock on Thursday. Im pretty confident, my main issue is with the exam questions actually, more than the content. The 4 or 5 mark questions about structure and bonding, I never know which points need to go in, e.g. Ionisation energy, shielding, atomic radius, nuclear charge, intermolecular forces etc..
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    (Original post by bitofageek)
    I never know which points need to go in, e.g. Ionisation energy, shielding, atomic radius, nuclear charge, intermolecular forces etc..
    All of them ^


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    (Original post by Dinaa)
    If you're wondering, 'How do I revise for Chemistry?'

    This is what I done:

    Firstly, I used the CGP textbook. Of course, CGP is simplified, but it's great to start with! I took notes from CGP and tbh It was pretty easy and Answered all the questions from the topic I'm weak in. 'Bondin' btw
    Then, from my notes on CGP, I bought revision cards (sainsbury's ones are great btw :cool:) and I was only bothered to make them for Organics, because I had a test on it. Got 26/30 btw.
    So, after using CGP, I used the textbook given to me from my school. 'Edexcel Chemistry by Ann Fullick'. This is more in depth and can look daunting to ascertain, but really, you should be familiar with most of the content. Minority of the data should be unfamiliar. Make extra notes on the things that you didn't know. I made notes on everything tbh, because I'm extra, but it wasn't too bad. Answered all the exam questions as well. BUT, I did miss out bonding.. It's just so boring to look at, serious.
    I had completed a past paper too, (hadn't revised Bonding, or been taught it properly too). Got 69/80, and lost most marks on the questions to do with bonding
    I forced myself today, to go through bonding from CGP, and realised that we haven't been taught most of it, which is probably why I found it frustratingly annoying
    But, tbh it really is quite simple.

    What I am going to do now is, make quick notes on bonding from the Ann Fullick text book, then flashcards! And MAYBE voice notes. Finally, bust out all the past papers available!

    When doing past papers, I do it strictly and get it marked properly. Or if I mark it myself, I make sure I'm strict.
    I highlight all the questions that I haven't achieved full marks in, even if it is 5/6, I'd highlight.
    First, I'd try to understand it, using the mark scheme and textbooks. If I still do not understand why I didn't get full marks, I'll go and ask a teacher!

    Hope this helped!
    I'd also recommend using examiner reports to help understand where most candidates go wrong and what they seem to do wrong. It really helps to understand examiner reports after you've done past papers. Look out for examiner tips they place in reports as well
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    I'm doing chemistry and it's my favourite subject! I'm on OCR if anyone needs any help. Just PM me, I'd be glad to explain anything
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    I do AQA anyone else have their mocks this week?
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    Thank you!!! On both counts haha :P
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    Not going school tomorrow :mmm: yess!
 
 
 
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