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    Basically does anyone have the 2014 paper


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    Had the mock exam today.. Oh dear
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    (Original post by AlphaTheRoadman)
    Basically does anyone have the 2014 paper


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    It is forbidden ...

    ... asking for it will bring the angry masses of examiners down upon your head and ensure your ultimate failure. :mob:
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    (Original post by Chinensis8)
    http://qualifications.pearson.com/co...e_20130604.pdf

    Q 22) e) iii) How on earth did they get COOH+?
    Isn't it obvious?

    Think of the functional groups on each of the molecules... Ethanol has an hydroxyl group (R-OH), ethanal has an carbonyl group (RHC=O). What does ethanoic acid have that the others don't? It has a carboxyl group (COOH). Since everything is present as a cation then it will be COOH+


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    (Original post by AlphaTheRoadman)
    Basically does anyone have the 2014 paper


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    I have it. is it allowed to share it here? need moderators confirmation..
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    (Original post by A84)
    I have it. is it allowed to share it here? need moderators confirmation..
    I don't think it is allowed as some people may still be sitting them for mocks.
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    Hi
    i just wanted to ask, was 2014 June chemistry paper hard??
    its just because i did it as a mock right... and it seem harder than 2013 and below??
    its my first year doing AS Chemistry and i enjoy doing it but when it comes to the exam its like i dont know anything?
    any tips would help please....
    thanks in advance
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    (Original post by HToo)
    Hi
    i just wanted to ask, was 2014 June chemistry paper hard??
    its just because i did it as a mock right... and it seem harder than 2013 and below??
    its my first year doing AS Chemistry and i enjoy doing it but when it comes to the exam its like i dont know anything?
    any tips would help please....
    thanks in advance
    What exam board? I did aqa AS chem last year and I found unit 1 quite difficult.

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    (Original post by Dylann)
    What exam board? I did aqa AS chem last year and I found unit 1 quite difficult.

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    i am doing aqa
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    (Original post by HToo)
    i am doing aqa
    I found that paper (when I sat it last year) quite hard, but then again, it was an extremely bad year for me.
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    (Original post by Dinaa)


    Help a sister out :girl:
    Like explain in depth, what this is asking me exactly, because I haven't clocked yet.

    RIP my brain.
    Not sure if anyone got round to actually explaining this.

    Firstly, what is the question asking. It is simply asking in the mass spec graph that is produced, where will there be a peak. Or in simpler terms, what is actually there.

    Inside a Chlorine molecule are two Chlorine atoms. Each atom could have a mass of 35 or a mass of 37 (due to isotopes). When we put chlorine in a mass spec we ionise it, meaning we kick an electron off one of the chlorines. This leaves Cl2+, a molecular ion.

    Because we have two chlorine atoms per molecule, we could either have

    35 35
    35 37
    37 37

    Which give total masses of:

    35 + 35 = 70
    35 + 37 = 72
    37 + 37 = 74

    Since the machine gives peaks at mass/charge (the charge is usually 1+, so the peak is at the mass) there will be peaks at:

    70/1
    72/1
    74/1

    or just

    70
    72
    74

    And therefore we conclude the answer must be 72, D.
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    how do you do this?
    4 In which of the following electronic configurations are only two of the electrons
    unpaired?
    A 1s2 2s2
    B 1s2 2s2 2p3
    C 1s2 2s2 2p4
    D 1s2 2s2 2p5
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    how do you do this question?
    11 Oxygen gas, O2, can be converted into ozone, O3, by passing it through an electric
    discharge.
    3O2(g) 2O3(g)
    In an experiment, a volume of 300 cm3 of oxygen was used but only 10% of
    the oxygen was converted into ozone. All volumes were measured at the same
    temperature and pressure.
    The total volume of gas present at the end of the experiment, in cm3, was
    A 200
    B 210
    C 290
    D 300
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    (Original post by bukosaurus_rex)
    No problem!

    Hold on, this is a very long post again (sorry)

    A2 is more intense, there are more challenging ideas you need to get to grips with, you definitely feel the work more especially for me since I took on all four of my subjects :eek: (I promise I'm not a sadist) but as long as you put in the work consistently it's not too bad.

    It is very daunting when you realise you have to be within 0.1, you don't find out how far you were from the teacher's result (well none of my class did at least) but in practices the closest I came was 0.2 most of the time.

    Despite this, overall I got 58/60 in my coursework (which was a surprise) so it doesn't hurt too much I guess. So don't get too bogged down by this. The most important thing is to learn the theory behind the experiments so you can answer the questions well (but not in too much depth that you begin to dream about it, your teacher should go through it with you at a suitable depth to answer the questions given correctly, but really it isn't that hard at all!).

    Don't worry about getting it right the first time either, you can try again twice more. But aim to get it right first time, it will save you to hassle of redoing it.

    I agree that unit 1 is quite easy, definitely the most basic exam. Just make sure you are very comfortable with everything.

    Unit 2, is a bit harder, but not unbearable. Just keep on top of work, and using tips that I expand on below and you should be fine! Learn your ionic formulae as you may asked questions that rely on you knowing that the hydroxide ion is OH- also learn the tests for different compounds (e.g. O2 relights a glowing split and CO2 make limewater turn cloudy) and the reactions between compounds such a complete combustion and incomplete combustion (these are all in your specification, of which you should know every point and be able to answer question based on these points, more below).

    The most "challenging" part of unit 2 is the Advanced Notice Article (which you might not find challenging at all), which is an article that they give you some time between Feb and April, I'm not too sure when. You are expected to read it and answer questions on it in the exam. I'm not sure how much help your school gives you, our school didn't do much on it at all. But it is very important and the questions come towards the end of the paper.

    It has chemical ideas that you will have covered for example my Advanced Notice last year was about the chemistry of wine, which was linked to primary, secondary and tertiary alcohols, esters, skeletal formulae and some other ideas. To see how it works, look at past papers and the corresponding advanced notice and see how they create questions from the article.

    Last year there was a teacher who posted a 40 min video on the Advanced Notice on YouTube and talked about what might come up and what you need to be comfortable with, which was so helpful as our teacher didn't do much at all. I'm not sure if he will do one this year, but if I see it I will definitely point you in that direction.

    The last thing (I think) that made unit 2 somewhat harder than unit 1 was that they want you to know more things from the Chemical Storylines textbook, I remember a past paper question asked what did scientists find in 1980 that made them feel differently about the ozone layer? (or words to that effect) the answer was a paragraph in the book. So make sure you have read your Storylines so you have some idea about what is going on, to be honest it is an interesting read.

    But this shouldn't be your main agenda, make sure you know all of the chemical theory before memorising contextual facts as they only take up 1 or 2 marks in the exam -- but these could be important marks in the grand scheme of things).

    Here are some of my tips for doing well at AS Salters chemistry, which isn't as bad as everyone thinks:

    To be perfectly honest, some of the people who find this exam board the hardest and perhaps didn't do as well, didn't know how to attack the exam in the right way (not saying my way is the only right way, but it helped me get an A when I was getting average scores in my mock exams and it helped my friends who were also struggling to cope with the course).

    With this exam board you need very specific answers for certain questions and the only way to get full marks for these questions is to do EVERY PAST PAPER THERE IS.

    Here is a link to a website with older Salters past papers, don't worry if you don't know some things in there, it is an older spec so the things you need to know are different.

    However it is invaluable in being able to determine whether or not you have a great enough understanding to be able to apply the chemical ideas to unknown contexts.

    You can get the newer papers that correspond to the spec on the website, which if you haven't been on it already, it has all of the resources given by the exam board, such as specimen papers, exemplar answers from higher band students and more.

    It sounds insane I know, but Salters chemistry loves very specific answers, I remember in unit 2 in the Atmosphere unit a question about infrared radiation and how it causes global warming almost always comes up and if you don't state that the bonds in the molecules of gas in the atmosphere absorb infrared and vibrate, you LOST a mark. Even if you said the molecule absorbs infrared, the mark is gone, so Salters is very, very specific in that sense and to be honest it is very easy to beat the exam.

    Sometimes, it can seem frustrating as it seems they don't even want your understanding, they just want you to answer it in their way. But some of the unusual context questions do stretch your understanding.

    So you can just learn off answers from mark schemes for some questions, such as heterogeneous catalysis, but be careful as you will have to tweak the answer slightly sometimes to fit the question.

    On this topic quickly; always answer the question, there is nothing an examiner hates more than a candidate who writes down everything they know about the subject in the question without applying it in one way to the question.

    This not only wastes valuable time in the exam, but it can also lose you marks that would have been easy to gain if you applied it to the questions. However it is good to start off writing some background information which leads to you giving reference to the question. A good habit is to quickly jot bullet points your answer in small writing next to or above the question then check if your answer actually answers the question. Then after you've written it out fully read the answer to make sure it is relevant if it is, it is okay to move on.

    Another thing to do is to get a copy of the specification on the website and learn off every single point on there!

    This is key because they cannot ask you about anything unconnected to things on the spec, at least one month before your exam go through the almighty list and tick off all the things you know confidently, then highlight the ones you don't and go over them. Try and find questions on these topics and practice. Make your weak points your strong points, if not you will regret it. I can talk from experience. In unit 2 you go onto E-Z isomerism which I was okay with, but I couldn't draw the isomers of more complex skeletal formulae and I left it until it was too late to fix it and it came up in my exam and I struggled and probably cost me a good few marks.

    So my advice is to make yourself be in a position where you are comfortable by May (or earlier if you like or maybe even the day before your exam ) that you can answer all of the types of questions you have come across.

    You obviously can't know what will come up in the test for certain, there may be a question that is asked in a certain way to throw you. However don't freak out, instead think, what have I learnt in this unit that can be applied to this problem? Even if it seems unlikely, if it is the best answer you've got, write it down.

    If after this very long reply (apologies, once I start I find it hard to stop) you have more worries, please don't hesitate to ask more questions! I know how daunting AS can be after GCSE but it doesn't have to be, once you know what you are doing you can be cool and collected and be ready to battle those exams in May/June!

    By the way, not meaning to stress you, but have you found out your exam timetable yet? If your school hasn't given you a copy yet, you can find it out on each of your exam boards websites.

    It is a good way to get you (hopefully) focused on and not scared about the exams and acing them!

    Hopeful yours are very spaced out *fingers crossed* mine this year are horrid! I have Biology, Further Maths, Chemistry, English Lit and Maths all on consecutive days :mad: on my first week!!


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    Is it the content or workload or both nthat seem to increase intensity?

    How many practices/attempts did you get?

    Wow :eek: but thanks for giving me hope how much would you say the coursework mark depends on practical skills in comparison to knowledge?-I'm better at wielding the latter

    Yeah I will. When did you start revising unit 1? How did/do you revise?
    My teacher emphasises equations soooooooooooo much and made us memorise charges on compounds and elements like silver and things we haven't focussed much on tests for things though so I'll look through the spec for it today

    Sounds horrible :eek: are the questions just applied thinking or do they try and make it really hard?

    Will do! Should I look at past advanced notice now or just wait it out until February? Thank you! I'll make sure to look for the Youtuber when I'm told about the advanced notice!

    Did you just borrow the book from your school or did you buy it? I'm thinking of starting looking through it as my school haven't emphasized it that much.

    Thanks for the tips and I've bookmarked the links as I'm currently on mobile.

    I found out my timetable yrstrday but didn't get a printed copy :/ the exams are like 4 months from now :eek: I know on one week I have 4/5 tests consecutively but I don't havevany 2 exams on the same day :awesome: I have 13 all in all but that's mostly due to maths being mean (6 exams -_- l

    Good luck!

    You take biology,chemistry, maths, English literature and FM AS I'm guessing? Medicine?
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    (Original post by charco)
    Avogadro's law says that equal volumes of gas under the same conditions of temperature and pressure contain the same number of moles.

    Gay Lussac extended this to say that you could use the coefficients of an equation where gases are reacting as volumes instead of moles.

    Hence:

    CxHy --- combustion ---> xCO2

    The volume of carbon dioxide formed must be 'x' times the volume of hydrocarbon burned.

    thanks so much
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    (Original post by Dylann)
    Not sure if anyone got round to actually explaining this.

    Firstly, what is the question asking. It is simply asking in the mass spec graph that is produced, where will there be a peak. Or in simpler terms, what is actually there.

    Inside a Chlorine molecule are two Chlorine atoms. Each atom could have a mass of 35 or a mass of 37 (due to isotopes). When we put chlorine in a mass spec we ionise it, meaning we kick an electron off one of the chlorines. This leaves Cl2+, a molecular ion.

    Because we have two chlorine atoms per molecule, we could either have

    35 35
    35 37
    37 37

    Which give total masses of:

    35 + 35 = 70
    35 + 37 = 72
    37 + 37 = 74

    Since the machine gives peaks at mass/charge (the charge is usually 1+, so the peak is at the mass) there will be peaks at:

    70/1
    72/1
    74/1

    or just

    70
    72
    74

    And therefore we conclude the answer must be 72, D.
    Great explanation! Thank you so much, I understand it better now! :hugs:
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    (Original post by ilovecake123)
    how do you do this?
    4 In which of the following electronic configurations are only two of the electrons
    unpaired?
    A 1s2 2s2
    B 1s2 2s2 2p3
    C 1s2 2s2 2p4
    D 1s2 2s2 2p5
    Each orbital holds two electrons

    There's one s orbital
    There's three p orbitals
    There's five d orbitals

    Electrons fill up empty orbitals first. Looking at C there is 2p4 meaning 4 electrons shared among 3 orbitals. So one orbital has 2 electrons and the other two orbitals each have one unpaired electron which is the answer. If you check the others they won't have 2 orbitals with only one electron in it each

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    Hi guys,

    When i was revising for my gcse/alevel chemistry i used this really useful website where you can contact chemistry oxbridge students directly who have already done their chemistry exams: www.thestudentsolutions.co.uk hope you find it as useful as i did!
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    how to draw a born haber cycle from scratch guys?? urgent help needed.
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    (Original post by haemo)
    I have some tips for AQA:

    I've wrote some notes up and I did the past papers (newer and older, 2006-2013) and then I looked at the June 2014 paper, something that I hadn't seen before.

    What I've found is, nearly every question is repeated.

    For example, drawing the shape of X molecule, there'll always be a mole question and a maths section, mass spectrometry, ionisation energies and electronegativity - just learn the basics on how to answer them.
    So shall i do the same???
    do all the past papers from 2006-2013 and than leave 2014 until im sure i know evrything??? how did you find the 2014 paper ???
    thanks for the help :five:
 
 
 
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