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    (Original post by jontypickles)
    Alkenes are hydrated into alkanes, not hydrogenated some sort of flowchart would be useful, is this a resource anyone has?
    Alkenes can be hydrogenated into alkanes.
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    (Original post by jontypickles)
    Alkenes are hydrated into alkanes, not hydrogenated some sort of flowchart would be useful, is this a resource anyone has?
    Alkenes can be hydrated to make alcohols (with steam).
    Alkenes can be hydrogenated to make alkanes (with hydrogen).
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    Okay well that is something i didn't know tell me more? Sorry for correcting you, was trying to help
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    How do u know if a carbon structure is primary secondary or tertiary?

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    Is it an electrophilic addition reaction?
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    (Original post by jontypickles)
    Is it an electrophilic addition reaction?


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    No, it's just a addition reaction.
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    (Original post by Kadak)
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    No, it's just an addition reaction.


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    (Original post by Gladiatorsword)
    How do u know if a carbon structure is primary secondary or tertiary?

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    look at whats around the carbocation

    general pattern: if carbocation is at the end of chain its primary.

    if theres two alkyl groups surrounding it s secondary.

    if theres three alkyl groups surrounding then its tertiary.
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    (Original post by ThatMadClown)
    look at whats around the carbocation

    general pattern: if carbocation is at the end of chain its primary.

    if theres two alkyl groups surrounding it s secondary.

    if theres three alkyl groups surrounding then its tertiary.
    How is 2-methylhexan-1-ol a primary alcohol? It has 2 alkyl groups? Doesn't make sense!
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    (Original post by rm_27)
    How is 2-methylhexan-1-ol a primary alcohol? It has 2 alkyl groups? Doesn't make sense!
    Its primary cos the C attached to OH is attached to 2 H atoms

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    (Original post by 2-ethylbut-1-ene)
    Its primary cos the C attached to OH is attached to 2 H atoms

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    What????? But that's not what you look at, it's the alkyl groups?
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    (Original post by rm_27)
    What????? But that's not what you look at, it's the alkyl groups?
    This way is easier

    Basically, if the carbon attached to the OH is attached to 2 hydrogen atoms, it is primary

    If the carbon attached to the OH is attached to 1 hydrogen atom, it is secondary

    If the carbon attached to the OH is not attached to any hydrogens, it is tertiary

    :yes:

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    (Original post by rm_27)
    How is 2-methylhexan-1-ol a primary alcohol? It has 2 alkyl groups? Doesn't make sense!
    are you talking about carbocations or alcohols? if alcohols you look at how many carbons surround the OH group
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    (Original post by jontypickles)
    Is it an electrophilic addition reaction?
    Hydrogenation is also called reduction.

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    Just a thought that popped into my head, is there any way to distinguish between primary, secondary and tertiary alcohols if the molecule has more than one hydroxyl group in its structure?
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    (Original post by jontypickles)
    Just a thought that popped into my head, is there any way to distinguish between primary, secondary and tertiary alcohols if the molecule has more than one hydroxyl group in its structure?
    Best way would to oxidise them and then test to see what the products are using tollens to see if the product is an aldehyde or ketone.
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    (Original post by ThatMadClown)
    Best way would to oxidise them and then test to see what the products are using tollens to see if the product is an aldehyde or ketone.
    The product would be a mix of a ketone/ aldehyde so it would be hard to distinguish...

    If the molecule has more than one hydroxyl group and it's in a different position (I.e. it's secondary in one place but primary in another) then you're probably stuck as that molecule isn't classified under one type of alcohol. You'd have to distinguish using other analytical techniques such as nmr.

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    (Original post by jontypickles)
    Okay well that is something i didn't know tell me more? Sorry for correcting you, was trying to help
    I had a little bit of a look around and I found this - http://www.compoundchem.com/wp-conte...ion-Map-v4.pdf it seems to cover some stuff that we haven't gotten onto yet (like epoxides) but it could be useful.
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    I just made this this is a flowchart of all the reactions we need on my course. Let me know if there's is anything I've missed or got wrong, because there's bound to be

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    (Original post by jontypickles)
    I just made this this is a flowchart of all the reactions we need on my course. Let me know if there's is anything I've missed or got wrong, because there's bound to be

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    Sweet! Might write up that sort of thing myself.
 
 
 
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