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    (Original post by Kadak)
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    Attention guys a TSR whatsapp study group has been set up.PM Sara_ara98.
    I've never actually used Whatsapp... But is it like a chat thing? I'm downloading it now
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    (Original post by l1lvink)
    I've never actually used Whatsapp... But is it like a chat thing? I'm downloading it now
    Yes.Pm Sara when you downloaded it with your number and she add you.
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    Is there a quick way to know if something has the following bonds when given only the name of the compound:
    -Hydrogen Bonds
    - Permanent dipole - Permanent dipole
    - Instantaneous dipole - Induced dipole
    - Permanent dipole - Induced dipole

    Thanks
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    Attention guys a TSR whatsapp study group has been set up.PM me
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    (Original post by Elhamm)
    Is there a quick way to know if something has the following bonds when given only the name of the compound:
    -Hydrogen Bonds
    - Permanent dipole - Permanent dipole
    - Instantaneous dipole - Induced dipole
    - Permanent dipole - Induced dipole

    Thanks
    If the compound has a hydrogen bonded to a N, O or F atom then you know it has hydrogen bonding.
    All compounds will have van der waals (induced dipole) forces
    And if there is a large difference in electronegativity ( eg. NaF) then you know the compound will have permanent dipole- permanent dipole forces because the bond is polar

    I dont know what you mean by instantaneous dipole- induced dipole and permanent dipole-induced dipole, what exam board are you, im AQA
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    Does anyone have a mind map of all the reaction for f322? The ones i've found online are either incomplete or inaccurate.
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    (Original post by jamesgates1)
    Does anyone have a mind map of all the reaction for f322? The ones i've found online are either incomplete or inaccurate.
    http://www.compoundchem.com/wp-conte...ion-Map-v4.pdf

    It has some non F322 stuff (like the amines), but seems to cover most.
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    Hi guys this may be a really stupid question but I was wondering why is CCl2 isn't the BENT shape so wouldn't the angle be 104.5 if it has one lone pair? I'm really confused not sure where 118 degrees has come from
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    (Original post by lucye7)
    hi! Sorry if i've done this wrong this is my first post! I'm doing AQA AS Chem and the spec says "appreciate the usefulness of these reactions (nucleophillic substitution) in organic synthesis" but i don't really have any specific examples and was wondering if someone could help me out thank youuuu
    Hi there!

    You haven't done anything wrong

    Uh in the exam they won't ask you to name an example of a nucleophilic substitution reaction.

    What they will do is show you a chemical reaction and they'll ask you to name and outline a mechanism for it.

    Here's an example:


    And then this what you do:



    Questions like this will usually be 5 marks but it can be 6 marks if they ask you to name the product.

    I hope that helped cleared some things up
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    (Original post by kandykissesxox)

    Hi guys this may be a really stupid question but I was wondering why is CCl2 isn't the BENT shape so wouldn't the angle be 104.5 if it has one lone pair? I'm really confused not sure where 118 degrees has come from


    Posted from TSR Mobile

    CCL2 has 2 bonding pairs and a lone pair,so it's non linear with a bond angle of 104.5 degrees.
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    (Original post by kandykissesxox)

    Hi guys this may be a really stupid question but I was wondering why is CCl2 isn't the BENT shape so wouldn't the angle be 104.5 if it has one lone pair? I'm really confused not sure where 118 degrees has come from
    If you draw the dot and cross diagram for CCl2 and, say, H2O, you see that because carbon only has 4 outer electrons 2 join in the bonding which leaves 2 electrons - ie 1 lone pair. In H2O you have 4 electrons left, so 2 lone pairs. This means that in CCl2 it is trigonal planar but with the lone pair pushing the bond angle out.
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    (Original post by Kadak)
    Posted from TSR Mobile

    CCL2 has 2 bonding pairs and a lone pair,so it's non linear with a bond angle of 104.5 degrees.
    but where has the 118 come from?
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    (Original post by ThatPerson2)
    If you draw the dot and cross diagram for CCl2 and, say, H2O, you see that because carbon only has 4 outer electrons 2 join in the bonding which leaves 2 electrons - ie 1 lone pair. In H2O you have 4 electrons left, so 2 lone pairs. This means that in CCl2 it is trigonal planar but with the lone pair pushing the bond angle out.

    i thought it was a bent shape?
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    Can someones give me the definition of bond angle & bond length (edexcel)
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    (Original post by kandykissesxox)

    Hi guys this may be a really stupid question but I was wondering why is CCl2 isn't the BENT shape so wouldn't the angle be 104.5 if it has one lone pair? I'm really confused not sure where 118 degrees has come from
    Bent shapes are for molecules that have two bonding pairs and two lone pairs like H20.


    *Please note that that diagram should say 104.5o

    CCl2 has two bonding pairs and one lone pair of electrons.
    As we know for every lone pair added to a molecule the bond angle is reduced 2.5o.
    So in this case we should reduce 120o (angle for 3 bonding pairs) by 2.5o because a lone pair is added to the structure of CCl2.

    I hope that helps
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    (Original post by Disney0702)
    Bent shapes are for molecules that have two bonding pairs and two lone pairs like H20.


    *Please note that that diagram should say 104.5o

    CCl2 has two bonding pairs and one lone pair of electrons.
    As we know for every lone pair added to a molecule the bond angle is reduced 2.5o.
    So in this case we should reduce 120o (angle for 3 bonding pairs) by 2.5o because a lone pair is added to the structure of CCl2.

    I hope that helps
    Ohh thank you so much! this made a lot of sense
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    Guys, are we meant to know how mass spectrometry works? (FOR OCR A) If so, can anyone break it down for me?
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    (Original post by kandykissesxox)
    Ohh thank you so much! this made a lot of sense
    Oh you're welcome, I'm glad you found that useful.

    May I ask what exam board you are and how old that question is?
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    (Original post by kandykissesxox)
    but where has the 118 come from?
    There's a little rule where you add 2.5 degrees per lone pair.
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    (Original post by Disney0702)
    Oh you're welcome, I'm glad you found that useful.

    May I ask what exam board you are and how old that question is?
    It's AQA and the past paper was from 2002
 
 
 
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