Join TSR now and get all your revision questions answeredSign up now
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by alevels2k15)
    Yeah! the answer is B
    BUT how?
    i dont understand how to go about answering this question
    When removing an electron from a different shell there is a big jump in ionisation energy because
    - there is less shielding as there is one less full shell
    - ionic radius is much smaller, shorter distance between the outermost electron and the nucleus
    (- higher proton to electron ratio)
    and so the attraction between the outermost electron and the nucleus is much bigger which means a lot of energy is needed to remove the electron.

    In this example there is a big jump between 2nd and 3rd ionisation energy, so you would know that it is a group 2 element as there are two electrons in outer shell of a group 2 metal. Group 2 metals form 2+ ions when it reacts with chlorine.

    Similarly if the jump is between 1st and 2nd IE the element is in group 1 etc.
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Connor_leigh)
    Yeah thats what my one was on aswell. What other lessons do you do? Any other ones with ISA's i can help with?
    I do chemistry, biology, English language and philosophy. I just did the practical for my resit ISA in biology where we had to paint leeks with clear nail varnish and use selotape to peel off the varnish. Then put it on a slide and count how many cells are in a row in one field of view. The practical was easy but plants are my worst part in Biology so if you know what I could revise that would be great
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by grapes12)
    I do chemistry, biology, English language and philosophy. I just did the practical for my resit ISA in biology where we had to paint leeks with clear nail varnish and use selotape to peel off the varnish. Then put it on a slide and count how many cells are in a row in one field of view. The practical was easy but plants are my worst part in Biology so if you know what I could revise that would be great
    We do more or less the same subjects oh my. What exam boards are you on?

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by KeilahDeere)
    We do more or less the same subjects oh my. What exam boards are you on?

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    AQA, and yourself?
    Does anyone know where I could find good revision notes on the biology ISA?
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Help.I haven't really done equilibriuma in my school,but how do I answer this question?
    Attached Images
     
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Kadak)
    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Help.I haven't really done equilibriuma in my school,but how do I answer this question?
    The rate of the forward reaction is equal to the rate of the backwards reaction, therefore the concentrations of them gases remain the same basically
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by grapes12)
    AQA, and yourself?
    Does anyone know where I could find good revision notes on the biology ISA?
    Is that for alk subjects? Ocr (a) for bio and chem, english lit and lang (aqa b) and religious studies (aqa)

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by KeilahDeere)
    Is that for alk subjects? Ocr (a) for bio and chem, english lit and lang (aqa b) and religious studies (aqa)

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    All subjects are AQA except philosophy which is OCR
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Anyone doing Bio or chem aqa empa ?
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by grapes12)
    All subjects are AQA except philosophy which is OCR
    My condolences

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    Have a couple of questions if you could;

    1) what is the significance of the alkaki being in excess when reacting with copper chloride?
    2) when calcium and water react, why does the hydroxide solid not form immediately, is it because the hydroxide is only slightly soluble?

    Thanks

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Does anyone know a site with loads of AQA amount of substance practice questions?
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    As anyone found the June 2014 papers for F321 & F322?
    Offline

    3
    http://gyazo.com/3a9590bb801c8a389579b255f2e490d1

    For part b why is it D not A? Surely as the moles are equal pressure makes no difference?
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by BBeyond)
    http://gyazo.com/3a9590bb801c8a389579b255f2e490d1

    For part b why is it D not A? Surely as the moles are equal pressure makes no difference?
    I think its nothing to do with the position of equilibrium. If you compress the gas the I2 molecules are closer together so the purple colour would be stronger (in a similar way to how orange squash is more orange the more conc it is)

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    3
    (Original post by samb1234)
    I think its nothing to do with the position of equilibrium. If you compress the gas the I2 molecules are closer together so the purple colour would be stronger (in a similar way to how orange squash is more orange the more conc it is)

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    ah G shout, cheers
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by BeckyWarkup)
    On the outline it said amount of substance and group 2, we have the paper tomorrow and apparently it has identifying group 2 compounds from how they react
    apparently they tell you in the question that mg(oh)2 , ca(oh)2, sr(oh)2, ba(oh)2; same thing mg, ca, sr and ba with SO4
    u need to know how each of these react and how to identify them.

    they are all colourless and in solution.
    this is not information from the paper, just what our teacher told us
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Hai


    I don't get this:

    "Graphite can conduct electricity well betweenlayers because one electron per carbon is free anddelocalised, so electrons can move easily alonglayers.

    It does not conduct electricity between layersbecause the energy gap between layers is toolarge for easy electron transfer."

    Says it does.. but then it says it doesn't... :erm:
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Dee .. ♥)
    Hai


    I don't get this:

    "Graphite can conduct electricity well betweenlayers because one electron per carbon is free anddelocalised, so electrons can move easily alonglayers.

    It does not conduct electricity between layersbecause the energy gap between layers is toolarge for easy electron transfer."

    Says it does.. but then it says it doesn't... :erm:
    It means it conducts within a sheet but not between them. Graphite is formed of hundreds of layers. Within each layer there is one delocalised electron per carbon which means that the layer conducts electricity extremely well. However there is a small gap between that layer and the layer below so it cannot conduct in that direction

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by BBeyond)
    ah G shout, cheers
    Isnt it just that there are equal amount of moles on each side so there will be no visible change ?
 
 
 
Poll
Which Fantasy Franchise is the best?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Quick reply
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.