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    I just wanted to ask people who do Law at uni or A-levels, do you find it stressful and if you are a solicitor or barrister, how long did it take you to find a job and is it really that stressful? Because I heard that a lot of people who become lawyers end up really heartless and annoyed that they did Law, I'd like to do Law at uni and I've always thought it was right for me.
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    Good question mate

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    (Original post by fudgecake22)
    Good question mate

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    Okay then LOL
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    I'm a sol, it can be stressful, though I work at a City firm. However, it's an interesting job and you get well paid.

    A law degree is tough around exam time, but people cope year in year out.

    You have to be heartless at work sometimes, such is life.
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    (Original post by Le Nombre)
    I'm a sol, it can be stressful, though I work at a City firm. However, it's an interesting job and you get well paid.

    A law degree is tough around exam time, but people cope year in year out.

    You have to be heartless at work sometimes, such is life.
    What do you mean by being heartless?
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    (Original post by sarskinz)
    What do you mean by being heartless?
    Sometimes you have to do things like put companies into liquidation, arrange contracts to shaft smaller companies, do the legal work on private equity buyouts which will lead to savage job cuts etc.

    You can't think of the repercussions for jobs etc., you are simply following the client's instructions and, bluntly, you're making a lot of money out of doing so.
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    I am a final year Law student at a fairly mediocre university in London and now, at about 4 months before my graduation, have lots of regrets and advice to give to others because of that.

    Firstly, I would not encourage young people to study Law in the UK UNLESS they've got their parents working in the field or have got strong connections in the field, to facilitate a job after graduation. Although I am a first class student, attending all events at uni, writing a dissertation, and have done pro-bono legal work throughout my studies, I have not made any connections and I am clueless and jobless at the moment. I know people who graduated last year with first class and are still jobless and living with their parents, no matter how many vacation schemes or internships they had done. That is because the legal jobs market at the moment is overly saturated with tens of thousands of brilliant graduates across the country and only a handful of full-time jobs. And the situation in London is by far the worst!

    Secondly, if I haven't put you off studying law yet and you keep reading, and if you do want to study law by all means, here's my advice to successfully doing it. The university choice is the most important. Try to get accepted at a top university if you want to have any chances after graduation. And I don't mean Oxbridge necessarily. In London, there's Queen Mary, UCL, King's, LSE etc. Outside London, the best ones are the ones in the Russell Group (Google it!): Cardiff, Nottingham, Durham etc.

    Thirdly, studying law isn't in my opinion as hard as they make it appear. The uni work and assignments are fairly repetitive and mainly consist of you reading a lot for tutorials, writing essays on stuff that doesn't come up again in exams, and (of course) exams at the ending of the year. First year is the best because you'll realise it's the easiest and the friends you make will be there til the end, the second year is the hardest because the subjects will be harder and the number of exams is a bit higher (I usually have 1-2 exams per year, but I had 4-5 exams inmy second year). And third year is a combination of the first two years, because it's really hard keeping up with the massive amount of uni work, but at the same time you get nostalgic about leaving in a few months so you make efforts to meet up with your friends and favourite tutors a lot more.

    Lastly, people who study law or are lawyers are NOT heartless at all! Their problem is, because they studied and worked very hard to get there, they most probably sacrificed a lot of their spare time and so they lost bonds with friends, hobbies and people skills, which makes them seem robotic and as lacking personality. You'll see that (and you can try this!) after a few drinks at the pub, in their limited spare time, they become human and heart-full again!

    I wish you best of luck getting into law if you really want to do it, because, trust me, it'll be a hell of an adventure that you'll end up enjoying more than you thought you would, because it'll transform you as a person and will help you grow mature!
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    (Original post by rri14)
    I am a final year Law student at a fairly mediocre university in London and now, at about 4 months before my graduation, have lots of regrets and advice to give to others because of that.

    Firstly, I would not encourage young people to study Law in the UK UNLESS they've got their parents working in the field or have got strong connections in the field, to facilitate a job after graduation. Although I am a first class student, attending all events at uni, writing a dissertation, and have done pro-bono legal work throughout my studies, I have not made any connections and I am clueless and jobless at the moment. I know people who graduated last year with first class and are still jobless and living with their parents, no matter how many vacation schemes or internships they had done. That is because the legal jobs market at the moment is overly saturated with tens of thousands of brilliant graduates across the country and only a handful of full-time jobs. And the situation in London is by far the worst!

    Lastly, people who study law or are lawyers are NOT heartless at all! Their problem is, because they studied and worked very hard to get there, they most probably sacrificed a lot of their spare time and so they lost bonds with friends, hobbies and people skills, which makes them seem robotic and as lacking personality. You'll see that (and you can try this!) after a few drinks at the pub, in their limited spare time, they become human and heart-full again!
    What a load of rubbish!
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    (Original post by Le Nombre)
    Sometimes you have to do things like put companies into liquidation, arrange contracts to shaft smaller companies, do the legal work on private equity buyouts which will lead to savage job cuts etc.

    You can't think of the repercussions for jobs etc., you are simply following the client's instructions and, bluntly, you're making a lot of money out of doing so.
    Not exactly representative of the ethics of most lawyers. Sounds more like one bad apple in a barrel of good 'uns.
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    (Original post by rri14)
    I am a final year Law student at a fairly mediocre university in London and now, at about 4 months before my graduation, have lots of regrets and advice to give to others because of that.

    Firstly, I would not encourage young people to study Law in the UK UNLESS they've got their parents working in the field or have got strong connections in the field, to facilitate a job after graduation. Although I am a first class student, attending all events at uni, writing a dissertation, and have done pro-bono legal work throughout my studies, I have not made any connections and I am clueless and jobless at the moment. I know people who graduated last year with first class and are still jobless and living with their parents, no matter how many vacation schemes or internships they had done. That is because the legal jobs market at the moment is overly saturated with tens of thousands of brilliant graduates across the country and only a handful of full-time jobs. And the situation in London is by far the worst!

    Secondly, if I haven't put you off studying law yet and you keep reading, and if you do want to study law by all means, here's my advice to successfully doing it. The university choice is the most important. Try to get accepted at a top university if you want to have any chances after graduation. And I don't mean Oxbridge necessarily. In London, there's Queen Mary, UCL, King's, LSE etc. Outside London, the best ones are the ones in the Russell Group (Google it!): Cardiff, Nottingham, Durham etc.

    Thirdly, studying law isn't in my opinion as hard as they make it appear. The uni work and assignments are fairly repetitive and mainly consist of you reading a lot for tutorials, writing essays on stuff that doesn't come up again in exams, and (of course) exams at the ending of the year. First year is the best because you'll realise it's the easiest and the friends you make will be there til the end, the second year is the hardest because the subjects will be harder and the number of exams is a bit higher (I usually have 1-2 exams per year, but I had 4-5 exams inmy second year). And third year is a combination of the first two years, because it's really hard keeping up with the massive amount of uni work, but at the same time you get nostalgic about leaving in a few months so you make efforts to meet up with your friends and favourite tutors a lot more.

    Lastly, people who study law or are lawyers are NOT heartless at all! Their problem is, because they studied and worked very hard to get there, they most probably sacrificed a lot of their spare time and so they lost bonds with friends, hobbies and people skills, which makes them seem robotic and as lacking personality. You'll see that (and you can try this!) after a few drinks at the pub, in their limited spare time, they become human and heart-full again!

    I wish you best of luck getting into law if you really want to do it, because, trust me, it'll be a hell of an adventure that you'll end up enjoying more than you thought you would, because it'll transform you as a person and will help you grow mature!
    I would agree with the above poster. Apart from the second paragraph this is utter tosh.
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    (Original post by Birkenhead)
    Not exactly representative of the ethics of most lawyers. Sounds more like one bad apple in a barrel of good 'uns.
    Please enlighten me as to how we make the world a better place when we do stuff like insolvency, fire and rehire work, the legal work on PE buyouts etc.

    Yes, sometimes you think your client is in the right and you're protecting them (eg. acting for AZ in the bid by Pfizer) but other times you think the clients aren't nice people but they do pay your fees (eg. Whoever acted for Pfizer in the example above). There are lots of lawyers who genuinely have a positive impact on their clients' lives, but very few of them work in the sort of firm I do.
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    (Original post by Le Nombre)
    Please enlighten me as to how we make the world a better place when we do stuff like insolvency, fire and rehire work, the legal work on PE buyouts etc.

    Yes, sometimes you think your client is in the right and you're protecting them (eg. acting for AZ in the bid by Pfizer) but other times you think the clients aren't nice people but they do pay your fees (eg. Whoever acted for Pfizer in the example above). There are lots of lawyers who genuinely have a positive impact on their clients' lives, but very few of them work in the sort of firm I do.
    That is precisely what my meaning was; you seem to have misunderstood my post.

    Lawyers who, as a matter of career choice, cynically prioritise their pay over being a half-decent member of society give every other apple in the barrel a bad name.

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    (Original post by Birkenhead)
    That is precisely what my meaning was; you seem to have misunderstood my post.

    Lawyers who, as a matter of career choice, cynically prioritise their pay over being a half-decent member of society give every other apple in the barrel a bad name.

    Ah, you made it sound as though it was me personally not all corporate lawyers.

    I don't have stats to hand, but I know the MC alone account for circa a tenth of TCs and I imagine around 6-7% of all solicitors. Given all the other firms in the City it makes up a significant number of all lawyers. When you take into account all the sizeable commercial firms doing purely commercial work in the regions nowadays I imagine you're looking at at best just a minority of all PP lawyers, probably a majority. With in house included I'd wager the majority of lawyers are now commercial ones.

    A lot of the work lawyers once did, lucrative or otherwise, simply doesn't exist in sectors like employee side employment, criminal, family etc. anymore. At the same time corporate and finance work in particular has increased significantly in the past 20 years, leaving law now a primarily business user service.
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    Wow this kinda put me off, but I'm not really interested in any other career to do. I know Law is not an easy subject but I didn't think it would be so hard for people to get a job after graduation.
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    (Original post by sarskinz)
    Wow this kinda put me off, but I'm not really interested in any other career to do. I know Law is not an easy subject but I didn't think it would be so hard for people to get a job after graduation.
    Studying law doesn't have to lead to a career in law. If you are interested in the subject then don't let a few comments off here put you off.

    In terms of the career, there are lots of different types of firms to work for as a "solicitor". Some will be deemed more "stressful" than others in terms of working hours or the "ethics" issue previously mentioned.

    However, those that enjoy their career don't necessarily find it stressful and those that do often get some kind of kick/buzz of the challenges surrounding that "stress".

    But if there is one common theme I would say about lawyers, is that they are determined and driven. They have this (at times excessive) need to succeed and do well and they don't mind putting in a hard days work to get that. In most cases these people just aren't affected by stress as much as others, and even when it does get to them they have an ability to balance it out by pursuing the things they know will make them feel better.



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    I am currently studying Law at the University of Nottingham and I'm finding it very difficult. It's an extremely demanding course in terms of academic ability and time.

    The workload is extremely heavy, and I would advise you to research into it and decide whether you are really passionate about it. If you are, then the workload shouldn't be so much of an issue as you will probably be interested and enjoy most of it. A lot of it can be very dry in my opinion.

    In terms of university choice, I wouldn't take league tables too seriously as they change every year, other than trying to identify the top 20 universities for the subject or so. It depends if you want to think about a career in law, and if you do want a career in law it is important to think about whether you want to aim for the top MC or SC law firms.

    In an ideal world, every university would get equal consideration, but the reality of the matter is that law recruitment is cut throat and there are universities that MC and other city firms tend to show preference to, for whatever reason.

    From doing my research when I was applying, this is what I saw most frequently occurring as the law schools that tend to lead to MC firms etc:

    Oxbridge

    LSE
    UCL

    Durham/Bristol/King's/Nottingham

    York/Warwick

    Birmingham/Manchester/Exeter

    Obviously this is open to debate, and it is not set in stone. The difference in tiers is not huge either.
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    (Original post by rri14)
    I am a final year Law student at a fairly mediocre university in London and now, at about 4 months before my graduation, have lots of regrets and advice to give to others because of that.

    Firstly, I would not encourage young people to study Law in the UK UNLESS they've got their parents working in the field or have got strong connections in the field, to facilitate a job after graduation. Although I am a first class student, attending all events at uni, writing a dissertation, and have done pro-bono legal work throughout my studies, I have not made any connections and I am clueless and jobless at the moment. I know people who graduated last year with first class and are still jobless and living with their parents, no matter how many vacation schemes or internships they had done. That is because the legal jobs market at the moment is overly saturated with tens of thousands of brilliant graduates across the country and only a handful of full-time jobs. And the situation in London is by far the worst!

    Secondly, if I haven't put you off studying law yet and you keep reading, and if you do want to study law by all means, here's my advice to successfully doing it. The university choice is the most important. Try to get accepted at a top university if you want to have any chances after graduation. And I don't mean Oxbridge necessarily. In London, there's Queen Mary, UCL, King's, LSE etc. Outside London, the best ones are the ones in the Russell Group (Google it!): Cardiff, Nottingham, Durham etc.

    Thirdly, studying law isn't in my opinion as hard as they make it appear. The uni work and assignments are fairly repetitive and mainly consist of you reading a lot for tutorials, writing essays on stuff that doesn't come up again in exams, and (of course) exams at the ending of the year. First year is the best because you'll realise it's the easiest and the friends you make will be there til the end, the second year is the hardest because the subjects will be harder and the number of exams is a bit higher (I usually have 1-2 exams per year, but I had 4-5 exams inmy second year). And third year is a combination of the first two years, because it's really hard keeping up with the massive amount of uni work, but at the same time you get nostalgic about leaving in a few months so you make efforts to meet up with your friends and favourite tutors a lot more.

    Lastly, people who study law or are lawyers are NOT heartless at all! Their problem is, because they studied and worked very hard to get there, they most probably sacrificed a lot of their spare time and so they lost bonds with friends, hobbies and people skills, which makes them seem robotic and as lacking personality. You'll see that (and you can try this!) after a few drinks at the pub, in their limited spare time, they become human and heart-full again!

    I wish you best of luck getting into law if you really want to do it, because, trust me, it'll be a hell of an adventure that you'll end up enjoying more than you thought you would, because it'll transform you as a person and will help you grow mature!
    Were all your exams in may? I have offers from both birmingham and leeds and I am torn between them. Leeds has exams in january and may so In your opinion was having all exams at once hard?

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    (Original post by annaw1996)
    I am currently studying Law at the University of Nottingham and I'm finding it very difficult. It's an extremely demanding course in terms of academic ability and time.

    The workload is extremely heavy, and I would advise you to research into it and decide whether you are really passionate about it. If you are, then the workload shouldn't be so much of an issue as you will probably be interested and enjoy most of it. A lot of it can be very dry in my opinion.

    In terms of university choice, I wouldn't take league tables too seriously as they change every year, other than trying to identify the top 20 universities for the subject or so. It depends if you want to think about a career in law, and if you do want a career in law it is important to think about whether you want to aim for the top MC or SC law firms.

    In an ideal world, every university would get equal consideration, but the reality of the matter is that law recruitment is cut throat and there are universities that MC and other city firms tend to show preference to, for whatever reason.

    From doing my research when I was applying, this is what I saw most frequently occurring as the law schools that tend to lead to MC firms etc:

    Oxbridge

    LSE
    UCL

    Durham/Bristol/King's/Nottingham

    York/Warwick

    Birmingham/Manchester/Exeter

    Obviously this is open to debate, and it is not set in stone. The difference in tiers is not huge either.
    Are your exams all in may?

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    (Original post by rkhan57)
    Are your exams all in may?

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    My exams are in January.
    It's tough because we have been set two courseworks to complete over Christmas and January exams. This would all be well and fine if I didn't decide to work full time for the first two weeks of the holidays. Now I'm panicking that I don't have enough time to complete everything to a sufficient standard.
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    (Original post by annaw1996)
    My exams are in January.
    It's tough because we have been set two courseworks to complete over Christmas and January exams. This would all be well and fine if I didn't decide to work full time for the first two weeks of the holidays. Now I'm panicking that I don't have enough time to complete everything to a sufficient standard.
    I have been given offers from both and birmingham and leeds and love them both however birmingham only have exams in may and leeds have exams in january and may. In your opinions would you say having exams in january as well as may has made it more stressful ?

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