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Is Law really that stressful? Watch

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    (Original post by rkhan57)
    I have been given offers from both and birmingham and leeds and love them both however birmingham only have exams in may and leeds have exams in january and may. In your opinions would you say having exams in january as well as may has made it more stressful ?

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    The bonus to having exams in Jan is that if I do better in May it will overwrite my previous score. It is stressful, but perhaps worth it. At the end of the day, it is first year, and the pass rate is 40%. Ideally I'd want 60% or more, but I know that I can still get through with lower if worst comes to worst.
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    (Original post by annaw1996)
    The bonus to having exams in Jan is that if I do better in May it will overwrite my previous score. It is stressful, but perhaps worth it. At the end of the day, it is first year, and the pass rate is 40%. Ideally I'd want 60% or more, but I know that I can still get through with lower if worst comes to worst.
    Sorry for all the questions but what do you mean overwrite your previous score? Does the january exams not count towards your final mark? Also what percentage exams and coursework do you have for your first year?

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    (Original post by rkhan57)
    Sorry for all the questions but what do you mean overwrite your previous score? Does the january exams not count towards your final mark? Also what percentage exams and coursework do you have for your first year?

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    If we do badly I think we have the option to retake in May and if we do better that score will go towards the final grade, not the one in Jan. I'm not entirely sure though.

    I have coursework in 2/4 modules and exams in 3/4 modules.
    I'm not sure about the percentage either, haha! Sorry.
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    (Original post by annaw1996)
    If we do badly I think we have the option to retake in May and if we do better that score will go towards the final grade, not the one in Jan. I'm not entirely sure though.

    I have coursework in 2/4 modules and exams in 3/4 modules.
    I'm not sure about the percentage either, haha! Sorry.
    Okay sorry last question now as I am trying to get many opinions; Birmingham is 94% exams in first year and Leeds is 77%, what would you say as you are studying law your opinion on this? Also which uni do you think is better? (sorry again for all the questions)
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    (Original post by rkhan57)
    Okay sorry last question now as I am trying to get many opinions; Birmingham is 94% exams in first year and Leeds is 77%, what would you say as you are studying law your opinion on this? Also which uni do you think is better? (sorry again for all the questions)
    Honestly, it depends on what you personally prefer. Whether you do better on coursework or in exam conditions.

    For me, I like the fact I have time to edit my coursework, but Nottingham are notoriously harsh with classifications, so they'll probably still be critical no matter how much editing or time I put into it.
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    (Original post by annaw1996)
    Honestly, it depends on what you personally prefer. Whether you do better on coursework or in exam conditions.

    For me, I like the fact I have time to edit my coursework, but Nottingham are notoriously harsh with classifications, so they'll probably still be critical no matter how much editing or time I put into it.
    okay thanks!
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    I studied Law LLB at Leeds. You can definitely strategically pick modules to suit your strengths (some have exams in January, others are 100% coursework, others are 100% exams in the summer and others a mix of both). Less so in First year with all of the modules being compulsory. I picked strategically in that I picked modules that were coursework heavy because you always have summer exams every year without fail at Leeds. But the most important decision re which modules you pick is whether you genuinely enjoy them or can engage with the subject matter - this will help you get to grips with concepts better and hopefully reflect in your result. This worked for me - I graduated with a 1st.
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    i wanna do law but i also want to have friends

    is this compatible or no?
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    (Original post by BullViagra)
    i wanna do law but i also want to have friends

    is this compatible or no?
    Nope, sorry, you cannot reasonably expect to have friends while doing a law degree.
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    (Original post by Unsworth)
    Nope, sorry, you cannot reasonably expect to have friends while doing a law degree.
    But you can expect to be able to afford very sexy glasses

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    (Original post by will2348)
    But you can expect to be able to afford very sexy glasses

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    Hahaha oh yeah, OP, the above more than negates the fact of not having any friends!
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    (Original post by BullViagra)
    i wanna do law but i also want to have friends

    is this compatible or no?
    Imaginary ones, perhaps. Even then your relationship with them is likely to come under significant strain.
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    (Original post by Birkenhead)
    Imaginary ones, perhaps. Even then your relationship with them is likely to come under significant strain.
    It's probably best they only keep imaginary friends limited to two, any more and it will inevitably lead to a decrease in productivity.
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    (Original post by Birkenhead)
    Imaginary ones, perhaps. Even then your relationship with them is likely to come under significant strain.
    are you serious?

    thats ****ing crazy

    im sorry if i sound like im 5 but surely degrees like Law/Medicine can't be the only degrees that kills the entirety of your life that isn't academic? I dont mind being a socially deprived drone as long as everyone else is as well.
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    It's not impossible to get a graduate job in law, it's difficult but not impossible. You mainly read on here about training contracts and city firms. Law does exist beyond this. If you do apply to the huge, international firms for training contracts then you'll need a lot of luck to get one. There's nothing wrong with applying for other firms that may not be as high profile.

    I would recommend applying for jobs early, attend careers fairs/lectures, and talk to the people within law who are there, see your uni careers adviser (the number who fail to do this is staggering!) and perfect your CV and covering letter. Also, don't be too narrow, search far and wide for jobs, don't be put off if it's not in the exact area you want. Your first job is a step on the ladder and the hardest one to get. Once you have experience of working in a law firm and handling cases, it will become easier to move forward.
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    (Original post by Chris22)
    It's not impossible to get a graduate job in law, it's difficult but not impossible. You mainly read on here about training contracts and city firms. Law does exist beyond this. If you do apply to the huge, international firms for training contracts then you'll need a lot of luck to get one. There's nothing wrong with applying for other firms that may not be as high profile.

    I would recommend applying for jobs early, attend careers fairs/lectures, and talk to the people within law who are there, see your uni careers adviser (the number who fail to do this is staggering!) and perfect your CV and covering letter. Also, don't be too narrow, search far and wide for jobs, don't be put off if it's not in the exact area you want. Your first job is a step on the ladder and the hardest one to get. Once you have experience of working in a law firm and handling cases, it will become easier to move forward.
    Even if it's a paralegal at ahigh street firm??:/

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    (Original post by fudgecake22)
    Even if it's a paralegal at ahigh street firm??:/

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    Definitely. I've seen people apply only for city firms and get nothing and end up not taking law any further. People can be too ambitious for a first job. There's nothing wrong with starting at a high street or medium sized firm and then applying for TC's from there.

    This shows both ambition and a willingness to work hard, even if it is starting low down the ladder.
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    I'm in my final year at Cardiff doing Law and I have a TC at Clifford Chance and I really wouldn't say studying law is as demanding as people make out. I really expected it to take all my time, and for me to have no social life but it's not like that at all. As long as you stay organised and leave yourself reasonable amounts of time to do the work you'll be absolutely fine. In my first year I worked at Citizens Advice, had a part time job, took part on committees, a sports team and still managed to get a high 2.1 and have a good social life which included many nights out. I had a similar experience in the second year, and even though the work stepped up a notch I was still able to do lots of extra curricular stuff, while applying for Vac Schemes and TC's, and come out with a first at the end.

    Some of the posts here seem ridiculous and I really wouldn't be put off doing law by them. You have so time to do the work set and as long as you work in an efficient and organised manner you'll find that you have plenty of spare time to do other things.

    I'd also echo what others have said, having connections within the legal profession certainly does help a huge amount. I had none whatsoever and had to build them up through open days and on campus events. The good thing is that firms really appreciate it when you do that, so you really should put the effort into it starting from year 1.
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    (Original post by BenMarshall__)
    I'm in my final year at Cardiff doing Law and I have a TC at Clifford Chance and I really wouldn't say studying law is as demanding as people make out. I really expected it to take all my time, and for me to have no social life but it's not like that at all. As long as you stay organised and leave yourself reasonable amounts of time to do the work you'll be absolutely fine. In my first year I worked at Citizens Advice, had a part time job, took part on committees, a sports team and still managed to get a high 2.1 and have a good social life which included many nights out. I had a similar experience in the second year, and even though the work stepped up a notch I was still able to do lots of extra curricular stuff, while applying for Vac Schemes and TC's, and come out with a first at the end.

    Some of the posts here seem ridiculous and I really wouldn't be put off doing law by them. You have so time to do the work set and as long as you work in an efficient and organised manner you'll find that you have plenty of spare time to do other things.

    I'd also echo what others have said, having connections within the legal profession certainly does help a huge amount. I had none whatsoever and had to build them up through open days and on campus events. The good thing is that firms really appreciate it when you do that, so you really should put the effort into it starting from year 1.
    Thank you for the positive post! Also, how would you go about making connections with people in the legal profession?
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    (Original post by sarskinz)
    Thank you for the positive post! Also, how would you go about making connections with people in the legal profession?
    Well I tried to go to as many events as I could. So for example open days, law fairs, on-campus events, then there is things like the Bright Network or CityLaw Live (I think it's called) which also give you the chance to network.

    When you're at these events I'd say always have a core number of questions that can be asked to anyone you meet, then if you feel the conversation is going well it's a good time to ask for a business card, or they may offer you one. Just remember not to stay around too long and divide your time up well between different people. Then you can follow up a few days later with an email thanking them for their time and asking them any other questions you may have.

    In my experience I've found some people to be much more helpful than others, usually trainees. There was one I met 3 times at various CC events and we emailed lots and then I mentioned him in my application, and funnily enough one of the partners who interviewed me for my Training Contract knew him, so that was a really good link. It's also very useful if you meet Graduate Recruitment teams. Again for me I met the ones from CC about 3/4 times and I'd mention when I previously met them before and if I'd emailed them.

    Hope that helps and you can message me if you want to ask anything else!
 
 
 
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