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    Suppose somebody is in the situation where they have no idea what they want to do in the future. All they know is that they are extremely passionate about one subject: History, say. They also have a keen interest - but not a passion - in Physics.

    In this event, should they invest £27,000 in a degree in History, a subject in which they are passionate, or invest the same money in a degree in Physics, something that has more demand and prospects?

    Should they follow their heart or their head

    EDIT: Suppose this declared passion was in Latin, not History. Would your opinion change?
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    (Original post by Hariex)
    Suppose somebody is in the situation where they have no idea what they want to do in the future. All they know is that they are extremely passionate about one subject: History, say. They also have a keen interest - but not a passion - in Physics.

    In this event, should they invest £27,000 in a degree in History, a subject in which they are passionate, or invest the same money in a degree in Physics, something that has more demand and prospects?

    Should they follow their heart or their head?
    Your degree is what you make of it. If you love History, do History. You can get plenty of jobs with a History degree!

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    I might be slightly biased here towards anything science-based haha, but I'd really think about the career prospects that either one can offer you, but obviously you don't want to spending a lot of time and money on something you're not really commited to :/ If you feel you can get a decent job at the end of the subject you're passionate about, definitely go for that
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    (Original post by Edminzodo)
    Your degree is what you make of it. If you love History, do History. You can get plenty of jobs with a History degree!

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    Would you say that about any degree?
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    (Original post by Hariex)
    Would you say that about any degree?
    To a point . . .

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    Head. Prospects is everything in today's job market.
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    (Original post by Mr Wrong)
    ...in retail or mopping up toilets in lavish eateries such as McDonalds. :rofl:
    Great one mate, Gordon Brown graduated with a degree in History and he became Prime Minister
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    (Original post by Magnus Taylor)
    Great one mate, Gordon Brown graduated with a degree in History and he became Prime Minister

    Oh well if Gordon Brown did it... Give me a break. And since when was becoming prime minister the benchmark for ordinary people?


    Ps. I was joking with my comment lol okay maybe semisrs
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    (Original post by Emsies)
    Head. Prospects is everything in today's job market.
    Even at the risk of not enjoying your course, affecting your grade in your final year?
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    (Original post by Edminzodo)
    To a point . . .

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    Where would you draw the line?
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    (Original post by Hariex)
    Suppose somebody is in the situation where they have no idea what they want to do in the future. All they know is that they are extremely passionate about one subject: History, say. They also have a keen interest - but not a passion - in Physics.

    In this event, should they invest £27,000 in a degree in History, a subject in which they are passionate, or invest the same money in a degree in Physics, something that has more demand and prospects?

    Should they follow their heart or their head

    EDIT: Suppose this declared passion was in Latin, not History. Would your opinion change?
    I'd probably take the one chance in my life to plough my time and energy into something I love.

    I did that (linguistics), and although it certainly would have made getting a good job tougher than my prior choice (engineering) I don't regret it. I did it at a better university than I could otherwise have done, and got better results than I otherwise would have done. And I spent three years loving what I did.
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    (Original post by TurboCretin)
    I'd probably take the one chance in my life to plough my time and energy into something I love.

    I did that (linguistics), and although it certainly would have made getting a good job tougher than my prior choice (engineering) I don't regret it. I did it at a better university than I could otherwise have done, and got better results than I otherwise would have done. And I spent three years loving what I did.
    How did this affect your job after employment? Did you convert to engineering or pursue a linguistics-related career? Or did you do something different entirely?
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    (Original post by Hariex)
    Suppose somebody is in the situation where they have no idea what they want to do in the future. All they know is that they are extremely passionate about one subject: History, say. They also have a keen interest - but not a passion - in Physics.

    In this event, should they invest £27,000 in a degree in History, a subject in which they are passionate, or invest the same money in a degree in Physics, something that has more demand and prospects?

    Should they follow their heart or their head

    EDIT: Suppose this declared passion was in Latin, not History. Would your opinion change?
    Its more like £47,000 when you add in maintence costs. Only you can decide if 3 years enjoying what you like is worth £47,000 and a harder time getting a job and with significately lower pay if you do get one.

    Personally, I would suggest you go for history but thats only because it reduces competition for jobs for other grads who actually like physics.
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    (Original post by Hariex)
    How did this affect your job after employment? Did you convert to engineering or pursue a linguistics-related career? Or did you do something different entirely?
    I went into law, so it affected my job significantly. I questioned my choice of degree at several points, but ultimately I did the right thing.
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    If you don't enjoy what you are studying you are likely to get a poor degree result - and have an unhappy three years at Uni.

    Advice here : http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/wiki...sing_a_subject
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    (Original post by Emsies)
    Head. Prospects is everything in today's job market.

    And your experience of the adult job market is what exactly?
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    (Original post by Hariex)
    Suppose somebody is in the situation where they have no idea what they want to do in the future. All they know is that they are extremely passionate about one subject: History, say. They also have a keen interest - but not a passion - in Physics.

    In this event, should they invest £27,000 in a degree in History, a subject in which they are passionate, or invest the same money in a degree in Physics, something that has more demand and prospects?

    Should they follow their heart or their head

    EDIT: Suppose this declared passion was in Latin, not History. Would your opinion change?
    Heart. Then again, any job would be better than the dead end one I'm in now.
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    I'd say go with your heart. I'm fairly sure I don't exist solely to go into the job market, so I might as well have some fun doing something I love, rather than trying to create some kind of odd life plan. One that is tailor made to get me a job I probably won't like, which may earn me a lot of money, but otherwise will probably be tough and make me miserable.
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    I cheated in that my heart and head were in the same place. They both wanted to do physics
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    (Original post by Hariex)
    Suppose somebody is in the situation where they have no idea what they want to do in the future. All they know is that they are extremely passionate about one subject: History, say. They also have a keen interest - but not a passion - in Physics.

    In this event, should they invest £27,000 in a degree in History, a subject in which they are passionate, or invest the same money in a degree in Physics, something that has more demand and prospects?

    Should they follow their heart or their head

    EDIT: Suppose this declared passion was in Latin, not History. Would your opinion change?
    This is a difficult one. It really depends on what you want to do afterwards. In reality, there isn't a particularly big demand for physics degrees themselves, it's rather that physics graduates display a lot of skills such as numeracy, problem solving and analytical skills that employers across a wide range of industries seek. However, a lot of physics graduates go into the type of jobs that a history graduate could have also been offered.

    Do you intend to go into something technical or mathematical when you graduate?
 
 
 
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