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Did/do you go to a private school and how was your experience? Watch

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    (Original post by SecretDuck)
    I've been to both private and state schools.

    In my private primary, I was pushed to achieve the best. In the state secondary, I had to do a lot of the work by myself. At least it prepared me for uni
    I only have attended state schools/colleges but was offered a choice between a private secondary and a state secondary and chose state because I couldn't quite get along with a lot of the attitude in Private schooling in my area. Sometimes wonder if I would have gotten an offer from my first choice if I had gone to a private school, as I didn't start working for my education until April of my AS year. Suppose they form individuals with different attitudes.

    (Original post by HSafirah)
    Thank you for telling me
    No problem
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    I go to an all-girl's grammar school (public school). I love it there and I can't imagine having gone to another school. The teachers are excellent, the facilities could be a bit better but we make do, and our headmistress is an absolute star. Like, she knows everyone in the school by name, and she wrote a UCAS reference for every single person in my year applying to uni (around 50!), most of them over her Halloween break! I've only gotten 3 B's over the span of my GCSEs and AS levels, so I'm pretty close to straight A's. There are people in my year who do get straight A's, and then there are some who don't (like, seriously don't - more like straight D's).

    I don't think it matters if you go to public or private school. I mean, a student is better off going to public school and working their butt off trying to get good grades than going to private school, slacking off and expecting everything to be handed to them on a silver platter, right? It all depends on how much effort the student puts in, and how involved the teaching staff are.

    My mum is a hairdresser (qualified about 3 or 4 years ago) and my dad is unemployed. I've got 5 offers back from UCAS, and that's all down to my awesome public school education.
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    (Original post by Iridann)
    I only have attended state schools/colleges but was offered a choice between a private secondary and a state secondary and chose state because I couldn't quite get along with a lot of the attitude in Private schooling in my area. Sometimes wonder if I would have gotten an offer from my first choice if I had gone to a private school, as I didn't start working for my education until April of my AS year. Suppose they form individuals with different attitudes.


    No problem
    In terms of the people, the state school people were miles better than the private school ones. I guess it's just judging from my experience, but I felt like all my classmates were hard working and trying to get somewhere in life.

    They're the sort of people I tend to keep in touch with.
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    (Original post by HSafirah)
    Can someone explain to me the difference between a state/private/grammar school etc that you have in UK? I'm not from UK myself, interested to know the system
    Confusingly, the terms 'private school' and 'public school' both refer to fee-paying schools in England. 'State schools' are non fee-paying, and generally seen as not as good as private schools (although the best state schools tend to be better than many of the private schools).

    The term 'grammar school' is generically used by people and the media to refer to selective state schools, but particular schools might have 'grammar school' in the name without being state schools. Manchester Grammar School is a private school, for example. The Royal Grammar School, though, is a state school.

    Non-selective state schools (generally seen as the worst category) are called 'comprehensives'. Even some of these have 'grammar school' in the name, though.

    Sorry, the terminology is really confusing. It's a product of history.
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    I went to a private prep school then did my GCSEs and A-levels at a state grammar. I had a really great time at the prep school. The state school was bland and soulless by comparison, but the teaching was good.
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    You can do well in a poor school though.

    I did a lot better than many private schoolers, it's just easier at a private school. Due to environment, teachers, methods etc
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    (Original post by sharp910sh)
    Rich asses
    sorry your parents are broke losers
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    I've always wanted to got to private school : (
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    I've been to both and I preferred the private school by miles. The worst behaviour in class was a bit of talking. If you bunked lessons you were basically expelled. People were proud to be at the school and most worked hard to get good grades. Not to mention better facilities and nicer buildings. Towards the end of year 11 we all had to see the careers advisor to see if our prospective alevel subjects matched with what we were thinking of doing at uni. I didn't do brilliantly in my GCSE's largely due to personal circumstances (poor memory and parents divorcing) and sadly I moved at ALevel. The school I moved to some younger kids thought it was ok to shout at 6th formers, they were horrible on buses pushing and shoving and being very loud on the bus. The school had far lower expectations of everyone.
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    (Original post by colourtheory)
    I went to a bad state school and got 2A*s 7As 2Bs at GCSE and A*A*A at A-Level and I'm now at Oxford. In fact my school was so bad that they lowered my tuition fees at uni. I think it's very possible for state school students to do very well but there isn't the same support structure and efficient exam preparation as can be found in private schools. I think private education pays off best for GCSE but evens out at A-Level.
    Yeah I agree with this. Many people at my uni U of Birmingham went to state school and people from my state school have ended up in Oxbridge and other top unis. My school did push us and drilled the importance of education/uni etc into us since year 7. I remember having loads of exams each term since year 7 and then having weekly mocks when it came to GCSEs. I moved to a different school for sixth form but it seemed like they still pushed the A level students. I also know people at my uni who went to private and didn't do as well in A levels. I believe that its really up to the individual when it gets to A levels but I also think that private school is good for providing other opportunities and connections outside education.
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    (Original post by sharp910sh)
    Rich asses
    bad day?
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    (Original post by sharp910sh)
    Rich asses
    Not everyone is a snob!!! Don't live up to the stereotype mate! x ...

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    I earn big bucks now. I won't send my kiddies to private school school.
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    (Original post by kka25)
    I've always wanted to got to private school : (
    Really?! I know a boarding school guy and he went to Nottingham trent. What does that say?....

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    (Original post by fudgecake22)
    Really?! I know a boarding school guy and he went to Nottingham trent. What does that say?....

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    Pah, it's the same old story isn't it? The public school students, ironically, go to Oxbirdge whilst the private school students go somewhere else.

    Well, I should put the word 'some' there but you get the picture.
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    (Original post by kka25)
    Pah, it's the same old story isn't it? The public school students, ironically, go to Oxbirdge whilst the private school students go somewhere else.

    Well, I should put the word 'some' there but you get the picture.
    Money can definitely help. But it can't buy you a brain. At private school I've been tp) you're actually taught how to learn whereas state it's hardly anyone pushing you. The teachers don't care much/bad behavior etc- I went for a year and hated it ). But my point what's the point on his parents investing £33k for boarding school and the dosey kid ends up at Nottingham trent. (Sort pf is my concern as I know the guy)

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    I'm currently in year 11 of an all-girls Private School in Birmingham. Unlike popular belief we aren't all snobs and rich, my parents work hard to put me though it.
    I think the main difference is that the teachers here as more approachable and genuinely helpful here than what I hear about most comprehensive/grammar schools.
    Yesterday I had a personal interview with a member of the senior management team to see how I was getting on with revision for GCSEs and what A-levels I might take. You get plenty of opportunities to talk about future/careers choices, and lots of opportunities for trips and completions.
    It's a complete myth that we don't do any work and get good grades handed to us. Yes, there is a lot of spoon feeding and guidance from teachers, but that's combined with lots of pressure to do well and go to good universities.
    One down side I would state is that there's too much of a focus on churning out future medics, and you won't be able to do some less-academic/known A-levels, but overall we do get the results.
    Almost all of our subjects are IGCSE, which you get used to. Unfortunately we have to do Latin, which everyone complains about at first, but gets better as you start understanding it. Plus it really sets you apart from everyone else.
    I just find that it's a good environment to learn in, there's not much disruption, small class sizes, links with the boy's school next door, but not completely mixed.
 
 
 
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