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    I suspect that many of you, now established physicians, once had a belief that being selfless and contributing to the well-being of others was your prime motivator of going into medicine and perhaps it was a reminder through the many years of education, and those yet to come.


    I recently took up a job in the city and I am based not far from the financial districts where I am constantly reminded of how well-off my other professional counterparts are, suited and booted, and looking determined. Even the foyers of the offices with their doormen, bright lights, ceiling to floor windows and simplistic decoration are head-turning and thought provoking.


    Not long ago when I was walking through this area I asked myself whether my prime motivation of going into medicine will be maintained, not just through school, but beyond that, in working life, especially through the tough times, and whether there was any shame in wanting ‘this other life’ and whether there would be any lasting satisfaction in it.


    Before you ask me, my intention to pursue GEM is the same as what your reasons were, but as I am getting older and more mature I’m beginning to think that whilst I may make more in financial gain through other professions, it’s unlikely to bring me closer to my desire for happiness as much as I presume becoming a doctor will. But as I’m not there, I can’t answer that.


    So, I have two questions. 1) Is the mindset of contributing to others’ well-being and your own selflessness in the forefront of your mind daily, or has it been reduced to ‘just a job’ like many other that just happen to be involved with making diagnoses and making people better, and can the profession be reduced to this. 2) Are you content? - Honestly speaking - have you made the right choice, do you ever reconsider whether it is really the profession for you? If you’re are/not content has this something to do with the profession/medicine.
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    I think your question is an honest one many people would be interested to know about. I'm still a year away from finishing med school so can't tell you how I find the actual work of being a doctor. I hope someone answers your question. Good luck x


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    I am an anaesthetic trainee now - have been working as a fully qualified doctor for 2 and a half years.
    I was one of those who wanted to be a doctor from the age of -2 and never considered anything else.
    I seriously wish i had now - its so easy to think thats what you want to do and when youve decided that, to be close minded to everything else

    Whether you enjoy your life as a medic depends on loads of factors, and its all down to the individual. i come from a normal working class background, not a lot of money but i never had money as a motivating factor. Nowadays though, its all about money for me. University was very stressful for me economically, i worked through out as a HCA but struggled. All around me the high fliers i grew up with were all graduating, getting good jobs, with good wages and immediately saving some, and those doing particularly well + those with help were buying houses - and then you are sorted anyway.
    Meanwhile im in several thousand debt, cant sleep, poor grades.

    And then you graduate and you are somewhere on 21k to 30k for F1, depending on your banding. My first year was spent entirely paying back debts to family and getting out of my overdraft. My second year i tried to save some money - and succeeding for a bit, managed to get about 4k, but then i have had several months paying fees, college admission, moving house for training again.
    If you dont do particularly well, or even if you do, you arent guaranteed to live where you want. I was stuck in plymouth for 2 years, originally from london, and i consider myself lucky - others getting rural wales or scotland.
    Then im forced to chose between career and location, and up sticks to the middle of nowhere to do anaesthetic training - if i refuse, i can never go down this line of work again.
    After these 2 years, the same thing happens, move again, probably to another part of the country. Then within that area, likely moving around different locations .

    So how does this affect relationships? Take a guess. Be prepared for long distance relationships. Train journeys, or intimate familiarity with petrol stations. You just about get settled? Off you go again. It depends on your partner for sure, if they dont work, or they can move easily they may be able to follow you around. Good luck though.
    You can try to coordinate your movements, really hard also.
    If they are also a medic - you are stuffed
    Or you go and do GP - 3 years training, its an attractive option, i never nearly did it myself. But this is a whole different discussion.

    Thats an essay before ive even spoken about the job itself.
    Going to help people? save lives? you will help people, this is for certain, when you get a chance to. It depends on the job you are doing. Working on MAU? Enjoy the hordes of patients, the endless list, your review of the patient and management plan you can't implement because you have to see the next one. And thats what they become , Bed 4, side room 2. Enjoy your doctoring for the few fleeting moments you get, because the rest of the time you are a mindless drone, duel wielding cannulas while writing discharge summary after discharge summary. You've read the anecdotes im sure - rearranging chairs on the titanic, glorified secretary. All true
    Gonna meet your non medic friends (or medic friends, although they will understand) after work? Sorry im late again. Or leave on time - the sub par care you've left in the back of your mind. Or its not, which is more worrying.

    Weekend away? youre working A and E, you are working 4 out of 6 weekends coming up.
    What you doing in July? wanna go on holiday? good luck - no rota till after youve even started. Youre on call during the available weeks, tough luck
    What does my next job involve? God knows, there is no induction, i don't know who the consultants are, i don't even know what ward to turn up to and at what time. What job on the planet , especially one which people's health is at risk, tolerates this much chaos?
    Your college quit, the other one is long term sick, you are 6 months fresh out of uni, you are doing ward rounds on your own. The reg is at another hospital. The consultant is .....somewhere. Ive got 40 patients + to see, then to do all those jobs ive set myself. Oh but its already 1030am cos we have just finished the MDT board round talking about how social care in the community liason worker only works mon- thurs, and leaves at 3pm.
    Ive got 15 xrays to request, an echo (re request from last week) and a CT ( q - *****y radiologist - prepare to do battle upon entering their cave, and curse yourself with "my consultant said...."
    Remember the headmasters office from when you were 9?

    Spare time? Fill it with the joy of audit, "quality improvment" research, presentation, case reports, a whole host of fun to do in your spare time. Its no extra, its mandatory, dont do it, dont get employed. Not interested? Face the hordes of questioning looks by those only a few years above, or the seniors, who have well and truly been indoctrinated.
    Pretend to be interested every single day. My face hurts from smiling.

    I have to end it here - there are moments when you do something great, you may save a life, you may get that piece of info which allows the diagnosis. You may spot something. You may have a heart to heart with another human. You might make a difference.
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    (Original post by Carpediemxx)
    I am an anaesthetic trainee now - have been working as a fully qualified doctor for 2 and a half years.
    I was one of those who wanted to be a doctor from the age of -2 and never considered anything else.
    I seriously wish i had now - its so easy to think thats what you want to do and when youve decided that, to be close minded to everything else
    ...
    I have to end it here - there are moments when you do something great, you may save a life, you may get that piece of info which allows the diagnosis. You may spot something. You may have a heart to heart with another human. You might make a difference.
    I'm not a stranger to some of 'horror' stories of working as a junior, and possibly a trainee, but what you have described here is perhaps on another level of job dissatisfaction many potential applicants would be put off by. I'm grateful that you've shared your experience of working life as a doctor as there isn't very much available on the reality of it, but equally so, I'm also mindful that this experience isn't near universal, or even the same across other anaesthetic trainees (or at least I hope as much).

    I still want to ask you those two questions in my original post; I really do want to know, despite what you've written, what your motivation is to get out of bed every morning, ultimately aside from financial factors - why you're still practicing?

    Financially speaking I'm not in a bad place, as I've been working since my original graduation in 2011. But with regards to money, I know that a physician's income may not seem to reflect the hard work in the first few years, but doesn't the gap between the level of work required and pay begin to close? In other words, the level of work stays constant with an increase in pay as you move up the bands?

    But I wouldn't say this discussion is about money, but rather becoming a physician is just a job, like any other that's involve with the care of other people, or maybe not so much as in your case. I think most people would agree that there is still an aura about going into medicine, and whether all factors considered, is worth it in the end.

    I'm also anticipating life as trainee in you situation to be worse if he was a GEM applicant, potentially qualifying early to mid thirties and having a family, maybe with children, too.

    Surely you have some positive points to share also?!
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    My family has a lot of doctors and the motivation for them is saving lifes, but in reality I know they must also enjoy and get pride from the sense of status.
    "You're brother is a doctor?!" "He must be so smart" and the list goes on.
    It's not all doom and gloom, and money isn't everything, instead you could be an over worked banker boy in the city who works for 3 days nonstop has an elliptic fit and dies (true story).
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    (Original post by J1mmy)
    I'm not a stranger to some of 'horror' stories of working as a junior, and possibly a trainee, but what you have described here is perhaps on another level of job dissatisfaction many potential applicants would be put off by. I'm grateful that you've shared your experience of working life as a doctor as there isn't very much available on the reality of it, but equally so, I'm also mindful that this experience isn't near universal, or even the same across other anaesthetic trainees (or at least I hope as much).

    I still want to ask you those two questions in my original post; I really do want to know, despite what you've written, what your motivation is to get out of bed every morning, ultimately aside from financial factors - why you're still practicing?

    Financially speaking I'm not in a bad place, as I've been working since my original graduation in 2011. But with regards to money, I know that a physician's income may not seem to reflect the hard work in the first few years, but doesn't the gap between the level of work required and pay begin to close? In other words, the level of work stays constant with an increase in pay as you move up the bands?

    But I wouldn't say this discussion is about money, but rather becoming a physician is just a job, like any other that's involve with the care of other people, or maybe not so much as in your case. I think most people would agree that there is still an aura about going into medicine, and whether all factors considered, is worth it in the end.

    I'm also anticipating life as trainee in you situation to be worse if he was a GEM applicant, potentially qualifying early to mid thirties and having a family, maybe with children, too.

    Surely you have some positive points to share also?!
    I sincerely hope i have put some people off. If you can truthfully tolerate all the above, then being a medic is a dream job.
    If you can't then it might not be for you.

    Positive points? You get to call yourself a doctor, you get a reasonable level of pay after F1, you can abandon the training system, or take some time off, and get mega rich by doing locums. Easy cash.
    You interact with people, and sometimes what you do will make the difference.
    You might get to save a life - very very rare to do by yourself, its almost always team work.

    There are a ton of positives if you look for them. I am not an objective person to ask tbh, since i am horribly dissillusioned by life as a medic. Even now im sitting here, on edge, nervous, at the stupid audit i have to do, and all the faff that comes with it. And then the massive research project i decided to help with in a moment of madness. Every day i have to pretend to love medicine, and all the good ideas people have. And every day im looking for ways to get home early so i can forget i have a job entirely.

    Whats worse is ive become too convincing - i am well liked by the department and they now expect things from me i have no interest in
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    Edit: Some highlights of my short career:

    1) Making a diagnosis out of hours, for a surgical team that wasnt mine, which my notes (+investigations and treatment) were noticed the day after and actually picked up on and fedback to me as a good job
    2) Making a diagnosis, organising the tests and doing them myself for a patient i was convinced had breast cancer despite being seen by a surgeon - i was correct
    3) Various hard IV access on patients who have had 10s of people try - little fingers have veins too
    4) Being told that the intensive care department at a the major trauma centre would like to have me as a trainee - while i was an F1, my first job
    5) Being told by my consultant on respiratory medicine that i "see the wood from the trees, and work well beyond my level"
    6) Loads of A + E moments where i spotted things that led to quicker treatment, including one woman was i was told " why are you referring me a corpse" who i managed to keep alive and was later discharged despite a lactate of >15
    7) ROSC in an open heart arrest, first on scene
    8) My first anaesthetic by myself - no problems , never been so nervous with a patient, but it was a great experiene
    9) More recently various A+E emergencies i get called to, a few with good resolution, and a few dodging ICU too

    There are more but i had to make it a bit positive since you asked!
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    There are similar discussions on Doctors . net. I am in my 50s and have a really interesting job in legal medicine. I see how ****ty medicine is for young doctors in the UK for exactly the reasons described by the OP. Salaries are very very poor (compared with what my generation earned as young doctors and compared to high flying graduates in other areas). Young doctors are treated as low grade shift workers in the NHS. The OP describes accurately the life of a young doctor without additional family financial support. I certainly wouldn't consider it as a career in the UK if I was starting out although my generation (early 50s) have largely had satisfying careers (husband recently retired Cons Surgeon). Our elder son, fortunately, has heeded the message and has stated a run through MEng in Chemical Engineering at Newcastle.
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    this is interesting. i am the complete opposite. i never started with a great desire to do medicine. i started neutral but i hated it at the end of medical school. i especially hated clinical medicine. foundation programme was grim and turned out to be even worse. i found it painful. i became very very disillusioned. once i actually got a choice on my career and started my core training i absolutely love it. have hope disillusioned med students and foundation doctors, when you pick someone you want to do you might find your nieche and really start to enjoy it
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    I've a little brighter outlook than carpediemxx, though perhaps that's because I've only had 5 months of actually very sheltered jobs so far.

    The money is good - even a low end FY1's wage is about the average national income and easily enough to live on. Ok some of your friends will get paid more than you, but others don't and others struggle to find a job at all. And then many of those jobs are repetitive dull as **** roles that must absolutely drain the souls of everyone doing them. At least you get to talk to someone during your work day - its easy to forget that many jobs lack even that, which must make for a depressing existence. I did mention my outlook was brighter right?

    Work days can be tough and on calls brutally busy, but I must say that its not been anywhere near as busy as I had imagined. You do have time to occasionally ***** about how busy you are to the nurse, you do have time to at least go to the shop and buy a sandwich, even if you then have to eat it in front of a computer. Its tough, but manageable. If other people can do it then you can too, which is easy to forget.

    An then its actually becoming a lot easier to work part-time and take years out than it used to be. A large proportion of doctors take an 'F3 year' as a kind of gap year before speciality training.

    What I must emphasise as terrible though is how doctors are treated in terms of job allocation and the utter and needless destruction of your personal life as a result. New hospital every 6 months is easily possible, meaning hours and hours of your life will be wasted on commuting, and as has been said you could be required to move around the country (Scotland, Cornwall, Northern Ireland, literally could be anywhere) as frequently as every couple of years. To make things worse, you only hear where you are going with maybe a month to spare; only get a rota on the day you turn up in some cases. Your pay depends on banding too so your income goes up and down relatively erratically compared to any other job. Your life is literally in just a state of flux with no certainty beyond the fact that your job exists. Want a family? "**** off can't have one", is what I imagine the NHS manager says as he drops his toddler off at the hospital creche (open only 9-5 of course, so no doctors could ever use it). This is something my girlfriend and I are going to have to somehow face and we have literally no idea how its going to pan out. Its pretty terrible.

    Something else that irks me is that I'm expected to do exams to enter speciality training, as well as do audits, various mandatory e-learning modules about random government-mandated ****... yet get 0 time allocated to do this. **** the European working time directive - just give people 'homework' to get around that I guess. The exams in particular are taking up all my free time at the moment. Exams that have a 30% pass rate and cost £480 to sit.

    Overall I am enjoying my time so far though and it has not been as manic or unbearable as it was portrayed to me before I started. I am still very much positive to any work experience kids I come across.
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    (Original post by Carpediemxx)
    I sincerely hope i have put some people off. If you can truthfully tolerate all the above, then being a medic is a dream job.
    If you can't then it might not be for you.

    Positive points? You get to call yourself a doctor, you get a reasonable level of pay after F1, you can abandon the training system, or take some time off, and get mega rich by doing locums. Easy cash.
    You interact with people, and sometimes what you do will make the difference.
    You might get to save a life - very very rare to do by yourself, its almost always team work.

    There are a ton of positives if you look for them. I am not an objective person to ask tbh, since i am horribly dissillusioned by life as a medic. Even now im sitting here, on edge, nervous, at the stupid audit i have to do, and all the faff that comes with it. And then the massive research project i decided to help with in a moment of madness. Every day i have to pretend to love medicine, and all the good ideas people have. And every day im looking for ways to get home early so i can forget i have a job entirely.

    Whats worse is ive become too convincing - i am well liked by the department and they now expect things from me i have no interest in
    Do you feel that you're making a difference in the same way you might have thought when first entering medical school? Do you have any lasting satisfaction - and if not, do you think you'll truly achieve it in your later years as you become more settled in your career?

    Is it right for me to assume by what you've written that your job is simply involved with treating sick people etc, but doesn't hold any higher value (at least not from your point of view)?

    And ultimately, if you're pretending to like medicine why are you still doing it? Is being called a doctor really worth what you're going through?
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    (Original post by nexttime)
    I've a little brighter outlook than carpediemxx, though perhaps that's because I've only had 5 months of actually very sheltered jobs so far.

    The money is good - even a low end FY1's wage is about the average national income and easily enough to live on. Ok some of your friends will get paid more than you, but others don't and others struggle to find a job at all. And then many of those jobs are repetitive dull as **** roles that must absolutely drain the souls of everyone doing them. At least you get to talk to someone during your work day - its easy to forget that many jobs lack even that, which must make for a depressing existence. I did mention my outlook was brighter right?

    Work days can be tough and on calls brutally busy, but I must say that its not been anywhere near as busy as I had imagined. You do have time to occasionally ***** about how busy you are to the nurse, you do have time to at least go to the shop and buy a sandwich, even if you then have to eat it in front of a computer. Its tough, but manageable. If other people can do it then you can too, which is easy to forget.

    An then its actually becoming a lot easier to work part-time and take years out than it used to be. A large proportion of doctors take an 'F3 year' as a kind of gap year before speciality training.

    What I must emphasise as terrible though is how doctors are treated in terms of job allocation and the utter and needless destruction of your personal life as a result. New hospital every 6 months is easily possible, meaning hours and hours of your life will be wasted on commuting, and as has been said you could be required to move around the country (Scotland, Cornwall, Northern Ireland, literally could be anywhere) as frequently as every couple of years. To make things worse, you only hear where you are going with maybe a month to spare; only get a rota on the day you turn up in some cases. Your pay depends on banding too so your income goes up and down relatively erratically compared to any other job. Your life is literally in just a state of flux with no certainty beyond the fact that your job exists. Want a family? "**** off can't have one", is what I imagine the NHS manager says as he drops his toddler off at the hospital creche (open only 9-5 of course, so no doctors could ever use it). This is something my girlfriend and I are going to have to somehow face and we have literally no idea how its going to pan out. Its pretty terrible.

    Something else that irks me is that I'm expected to do exams to enter speciality training, as well as do audits, various mandatory e-learning modules about random government-mandated ****... yet get 0 time allocated to do this. **** the European working time directive - just give people 'homework' to get around that I guess. The exams in particular are taking up all my free time at the moment. Exams that have a 30% pass rate and cost £480 to sit.

    Overall I am enjoying my time so far though and it has not been as manic or unbearable as it was portrayed to me before I started. I am still very much positive to any work experience kids I come across.
    Your experience are probably more in line with what I was expecting.

    Does the travelling come to an end for the most part after the F2 year? And what exam as a 30% pass rate - is it dependent on the speciality you go into?

    I'd put a similar question to you, as above: presuming you went into medicine to have a lasting satisfaction in your life about your contribution to others' well-being, can you say that you're feeling that now? Or do you think you'll ever get there?

    Do you regret becoming a doctor?

    In this thread I'm trying to gather whether students who go into medicine actually experience the satisfaction of helping others later on in their career when they begin practicing. Personally, I don't know whether at the age of 16 or 17 when choosing your A-Levels or even picking a course to study at university is too young of an age to decide to commit the rest of your life to a vocation like medicine.
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    (Original post by J1mmy)
    Do you feel that you're making a difference in the same way you might have thought when first entering medical school? Do you have any lasting satisfaction - and if not, do you think you'll truly achieve it in your later years as you become more settled in your career?

    Is it right for me to assume by what you've written that your job is simply involved with treating sick people etc, but doesn't hold any higher value (at least not from your point of view)?

    And ultimately, if you're pretending to like medicine why are you still doing it? Is being called a doctor really worth what you're going through?
    I've made differences in people's lives, I genuinely know and believe that, some people have been so grateful ... I don't know why, but it holds no meaning for me, and it's happening with negatives too.. 3 people died last week and I felt nothing

    For sure, more senior you get the bigger impact you make, surgery for example will bring great levels of satisfaction once you are reg and higher

    Why I still do it? Too afraid to quit

    Edit: to answer your question , you can get the same level of satisfaction one would expect at application, just there are other things to overshadow it
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    (Original post by J1mmy)
    Does the travelling come to an end for the most part after the F2 year?
    No - that's when it starts in ernest! At least at FY you are very likely to be in one hospital for a year. Beyond that you can be one place for 6 months then 100 miles away for the next, or possibly even at a split-site post working at a different hospital each day.

    It becomes more stable once you land a consultant post.

    And what exam as a 30% pass rate - is it dependent on the speciality you go into?
    Every speciality has a membership exam with similar pass rates and similar costs (that was only part 1 that cost £480 btw - part two costs significantly more). They are compulsory to get past a certain level of training (generally the ST/CT2-3 or 3-4 boundaries).

    I'd put a similar question to you, as above: presuming you went into medicine to have a lasting satisfaction in your life about your contribution to others' well-being, can you say that you're feeling that now? Or do you think you'll ever get there?
    I feel i have helped people. In the same way any secretary might - the paperwork was needed and I did it. Have I saved anyone's life? Most definitely not. At least, not whilst working in this country.

    I do think that the registrar's have sufficient authority and knowledge to make a big difference though.

    Do you regret becoming a doctor?
    No. I am very grateful I don't have to try to find my way through today's job market.

    Long term I will not stay in the country.
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    (Original post by Carpediemxx)
    I sincerely hope i have put some people off. If you can truthfully tolerate all the above, then being a medic is a dream job.
    If you can't then it might not be for you.
    If you'd done a different career, you may have been equally disillusioned by that... The grass is always greener, as they say.
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    I really dislike the long hours beyond what I'm contracted to do, the fact that HR can never get my pay right, the fact that induction at a new trust is always abysmal, the pressure of discharging people quickly, the services in hospitals that stop at a certain time when my position is 24/7, the annoying bleeps, the ungrateful relatives, the cost of exams, the fact that in house teaching is so abysmal, the fact that I can only get to regional training days on my annual leave,

    God what else is there? Probably billions of things.

    But I wouldn't do any other job in the world. Honestly. Looking back I've enjoyed the last four years.
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    (Original post by Carpediemxx)
    I've made differences in people's lives, I genuinely know and believe that, some people have been so grateful ... I don't know why, but it holds no meaning for me, and it's happening with negatives too.. 3 people died last week and I felt nothing

    For sure, more senior you get the bigger impact you make, surgery for example will bring great levels of satisfaction once you are reg and higher

    Why I still do it? Too afraid to quit

    Edit: to answer your question , you can get the same level of satisfaction one would expect at application, just there are other things to overshadow it
    So looking back, what were you genuine motives for going into medicine in the first place?

    So would you say that as you make your way to the top medics begin to 'see the light' so to speak, that it gets better and the job itself is more inline with what your original motives were? And do you think this is why you're not quitting just yet?

    What are you afraid of exactly?
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    Doctors tend to be ambitious intelligent motivated people and it's not surprising that after a few years in the job many get a bit bored.
    I agree with others though that the same goes for most other jobs. Friends of mine who are teachers, accountants, lawyers, engineers also get bored and wish they were doing something else sometimes.
    The only time I felt I had a vocation was when I wanted to be a nun age 14, medicine is a job. A fascinating job but still a job, if they didn't pay me I wouldn't do it.
    The prestige has never bothered me and can be a hindrance when people expect you to be saintly and self sacrificing. You won't make a fortune in most branches of medicine but you won't be poor either.
    You have to enjoy the job and enjoy working with people though as it is emotionally physically and intellectually draining.
    It is also fascinating and challenging and you constantly learn new things and the range of things you can do and places you can work is excellent.
    I couldn't work in the stock exchange or similar, I do consider them parasites the world would be better without. My life would not be enhanced by more money.
    If I hadn't been a doctor there are a lot of other jobs I could have happily done though. I wouldn't have gone into any of these for prestige or money though but because I found that job or area interesting and fun.
    There are some people in medicine who would be happier in other careers.
    Have a think about what you would do if you weren't a doctor. When I've been pissed off with the job I've done this and usually decided that medicine isn't that bad. I agree that the junior doc years are the worst. The cameraderie kept me sane through those.
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    (Original post by taysidefrog)
    Doctors tend to be ambitious intelligent motivated people and it's not surprising that after a few years in the job many get a bit bored.
    I agree with others though that the same goes for most other jobs. Friends of mine who are teachers, accountants, lawyers, engineers also get bored and wish they were doing something else sometimes.
    The only time I felt I had a vocation was when I wanted to be a nun age 14, medicine is a job. A fascinating job but still a job, if they didn't pay me I wouldn't do it.
    The prestige has never bothered me and can be a hindrance when people expect you to be saintly and self sacrificing. You won't make a fortune in most branches of medicine but you won't be poor either.
    You have to enjoy the job and enjoy working with people though as it is emotionally physically and intellectually draining.
    It is also fascinating and challenging and you constantly learn new things and the range of things you can do and places you can work is excellent.
    I couldn't work in the stock exchange or similar, I do consider them parasites the world would be better without. My life would not be enhanced by more money.
    If I hadn't been a doctor there are a lot of other jobs I could have happily done though. I wouldn't have gone into any of these for prestige or money though but because I found that job or area interesting and fun.
    There are some people in medicine who would be happier in other careers.
    Have a think about what you would do if you weren't a doctor. When I've been pissed off with the job I've done this and usually decided that medicine isn't that bad. I agree that the junior doc years are the worst. The cameraderie kept me sane through those.
    Thanks for your input.

    You've touched upon the pros and cons of medicine and life as a medic, but what I'm really after is something a little different. Are you content with your life as a medic now that you're experiencing the reality?

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    I think what I'm really after in this thread is trying to find out whether the motivations of entering medical school actually materialised and motivate you as a medic in the real world.

    I'm not so much looking for the cons, I know there are many, but whilst that's important to mention, what I think hasn't been touched upon in previous similar discussions is whether medics are truly satisfied with their career choices, that is, satisfied for entering medicine in the first place. I don't think there is much introspection going on once someone has finally 'made it' post-graduation to look back and think whether all that slogging was finally worth it, not only in terms of the job being pleasurable to do, but whether all those hopeful things one said in the UCAS personal statement actually has come to fruition. And I suppose that also depends on how much of a big deal getting into medicine was in the first place.

    And just because is loosely fits around this discussion, I recently came across some interesting articles to share, which some of you may or may not agree with, but it seems to be in-line of what's been mentioned already:

    http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/dr-z...b_6279784.html
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    (Original post by nexttime)
    I feel i have helped people. In the same way any secretary might - the paperwork was needed and I did it. Have I saved anyone's life? Most definitely not. At least, not whilst working in this country.

    I do think that the registrar's have sufficient authority and knowledge to make a big difference though.

    Long term I will not stay in the country.
    Now that you're practicing medicine in the real world, would you say that it what you expected way back when you were sending off your UCAS application? And this is in terms of contentment and job satisfaction, I presume that the latter hasn't quite met your expectation based on what you mentioned earlier?

    What were you motivations on your UCAS personal statement?

    I agree, it seems that as you move up the ranks into a more senior registrar and eventually consultant, the brunt of it lessens, but from what I've heard from other consultants, instead of the difficulties you face when you were a junior, there are new challenges waiting for you near the top. And I assume this is the 'light' at the end of the tunnel for juniors, so escape the life of a trainee and move into a position of seniority where things might be a little more calmer.

    Is your decision to move out of the country to do with the working conditions of the NHS?
 
 
 
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