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    I wonder though if some of the idealistic reasons, that attract many applicants to medicine, simply just don't exist in the real world and the disappointment this causes can be a bit jarring until you find the realistic ways to enjoy medicine.

    I am only a first year med student but I have been a nurse for a few years. I went into this without any idealistic notions of what medicine is like and know the general c*** I am in store for. Yet I still did it. I suppose that's because I know there are aspects of it that I enjoy and will hopefully be good at.

    I have learnt it's more the little things that matter to me. I may not directly save lives very often but I know I make a difference. As a student nurse I once looked after an acquaintance of my mum's. Years later he saw her and passed on his thanks for my care and attention. I was a student nurse so realistically I did very little to aid his treatment but what every I did had made it slightly easier for him. And that meant a lot to me.
    And I suppose it's things like that that I will hopefully bring to my career as a doctor (and hopefully whatever system is in place at that time will allow me to do so).

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    (Original post by J1mmy)
    Thanks for your input - you've come closer to the sort of comment I'm after in this thread

    May I ask, are you a trainee in a speciality?

    Are the students 'satisfied' once graduating from FY1/2 because they know nothing else apart from medicine, and thus can't compare it to any other profession, or are they satisfied that the profession which they chose when they were a teen, 5 or 6 years ago, is beginning to materialise as they imagined it as they wrote about it back then on their applications? It's a difficult one to distinguish, perhaps. And we're not sure whether majority of junior doctors going into specialty training are actually feeling the same level of contentment and satisfaction, internally, with their level of contribution to the wider society as skillful professionals.
    I'm an ST3 (first year registrar) in anaesthetics.

    You don't "graduate" from FY1/2, nor are you a student during the foundation programme, but semantics aside, I don't think it's just because we don't know anything else. I also wouldn't say that it's turning out like I hoped when I was a teenager - for starters I'm not in one of the specialties I thought I would be in, and more importantly I'm not the same person I was when I was 17, so of course my experience is different from what I expected! I am (mostly) satisfied because I get to do something I enjoy, which other people (patients and colleagues) need and respect and which most of the time works well. I can't speak for everyone though.

    Medicine is a "lifestyle" as you mentioned, but how much you buy into that lifestyle can vary. There are some people for whom their job is their life, some for whom it is "just a job" (though because it is so intense and different from many other jobs they still tend to think/talk about medic stuff a lot!) and most of us are somewhere in between. I give a lot of time and energy to my job, and am aware that a lot of my personality is wrapped around me being a doctor, but I do try not to let it take over everything I do!
 
 
 
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