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    No, what a ridiculous idea. Just make the GCSE harder, rather than forcing everyone to take it till A level.
    /thread
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    (Original post by LadyMede)
    That is exactly me. I got 4As*, 2As 1 B and a C at GCSE, B + C being science and Maths

    I'm currently doing english at KCL. Lord knows how I would have gotten in if I was being forced to do maths
    Exactly. It seems rather an excessive thing to say, but I do not know how I would have gotten through this year if I had to do maths.

    How is KCL btw? I'm thinking of applying.


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    (Original post by rosebud114)
    I got a C in maths also, I would feel the same about A-level! and that quote is true in my case,I take both English Lit and Chemistry and can do both extremely well but for some reason when it comes to Maths in Chemistry I understand it SO much better;my normal maths is lacking, maybe it's the way the questions are worded.
    Exactly. I achieved As in both core science and additional science, with ease despite the maths involved. I can relate. I do not believe that after standard education we should be forced to continue subjects which we find extremely down-heartening or possess no natural interest in.


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    No.

    GCSE Maths was a horrible experience, because for the most part you were stuck in a classroom where very few wanted to work, very few wanted to be there. It meant lessons were never productive, and I felt that I was never actually moving forward with my maths ability because the whole lesson would be spent with a class talking. I associated with maths very negatively in GCSE, and it made me less inclined to work.

    In A-level, it was altogether a nicer experience, because we all had a reasonable level of dedication to maths, and I personally felt motivated.

    Also to add, the point of GCSEs is to give you a basic grounding in a wide range of subjects. GCSE Maths gives you a basic grounding of Maths, which is more than enough for most situations.
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    (Original post by loperdoper)
    No.

    GCSE Maths was a horrible experience, because for the most part you were stuck in a classroom where very few wanted to work, very few wanted to be there. It meant lessons were never productive, and I felt that I was never actually moving forward with my maths ability because the whole lesson would be spent with a class talking. I associated with maths very negatively in GCSE, and it made me less inclined to work.

    In A-level, it was altogether a nicer experience, because we all had a reasonable level of dedication to maths, and I personally felt motivated.

    Also to add, the point of GCSEs is to give you a basic grounding in a wide range of subjects. GCSE Maths gives you a basic grounding of Maths, which is more than enough for most situations.
    Exactly why we need grammar schools


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    I don't think A Level Maths should be made compulsory! Although I plan on taking Maths at AS, I think it should be the choice of the individual as people have different strengths and weaknesses. Also, it is terrible of a teacher to degrade a students ability, within any subject. I believe that with the support of an encouraging teacher, a student has the potential to achieve any grade they desire. I say this because for the past five years I've had an amazing set of teachers guide me through my education, across the board in every single subject. One of the kindest and most touching things my maths teacher has ever said to me is 'I believe in you and your ability. You can do it' which means the world, especially when you lack confidence in certain topics. I don't think I'd be doing half as well in Maths without the set of teachers that have taught me through my five years of secondary school. I certainly wouldn't be thinking about taking Maths AS if I was struggling with the subject, so I think the idea of Maths being made into a compulsory subject at A Level is ridiculous. The very thought of it is possibly the worst, most agonising form of torture some students imagine could be inflicted upon them. Plus, GCSE Maths equips you with all the skills you need and use in everyday life, why go to the extreme of causing students undue amounts of stress and pressure!
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    No, but a lot of the A level content could be transferred to the GCSE to make it better.
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    I don't think people who don't study science will ever really need maths to A level standard. It's hard enough for people who are genuinely interested in the subject to get OK grades, I highly doubt it would be appropriate for most people to take it.

    However I do think that there should be a system in place to encourage people who got Bs/Cs to retake their maths GCSE at 6th form with a view to learn more about maths and functions to higher tier standard, or to take another maths GCSE-level course alongside their A levels. All optional, but it could encourage more people to get a higher standard of maths (but not so impossibly high as A level), better their initial results, etc. I can definitely see some people who only got entered for foundation tier GCSE maths getting a B on a higher tier paper.
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    Students who take A Level subjects in Science/Economics should be forced to take Maths as high level Maths skills are extremely useful in most science degrees and careers and a lot of universities want it for those courses.I would like to say that I believe this because the level of Maths in Science/Economics A Levels is shocking and not giving students enough understanding of higher level Mathematics and thus universities are asking for Maths A Level and those who don't take it can't get in or limit their chances.However, ideally I think that Science A Levels should be changed to contain enough rigorous maths that it isn't necessary to take the Maths A Level eg. Physics A Level should become a lot more like Mechanics Maths modules.
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    NEVER! :eek:
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    Yes
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    Even though I love maths myself I definitely think no!
    I don't think one should take a subject they are destined to fail in. Some people just do not understand maths no matter how hard they try. I think that time would be spent something they do instead of assisting the inevitable failure.
    A bad idea, some people find GCSE maths a stretch!
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    No!
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    I don't think they should specifically for maths...they've created new maths GCSES now for first teaching in 2015 (I think), that should improve the quality of the maths skills learnt at GCSE.

    Instead imo, I think they should make a rule for everyone to do at least one facilitating subject (although everyone pretty much does on TSR but there's plenty of people at my school who don't at all). This would give students more choice/flexibility, to see what particular subject would be more relevant for their career path; this would be a much better rule than certain schools forcing their students to do subjects such as general studies (which unis don't care about). It's a shame that a large amount of students don't know what a levels to choose, so they just pick random a levels and when they decide their career path later in the year, they don't make the entry requirements so they have to re-do the year.
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    definitely not

    no subject should be compulsory
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    In my country you can pass our equivalent of A levels on either basic or advanced level. Since a reform was passed a few years ago, in order to be considered someone who has completed education on A levels level, you need to pass basic exams in our native language & literature (one exam), maths and a chosen modern foreign language. Apart from those, you can attempt I think up to six advanced exams. It seems quite decent to me.
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    (Original post by felamaslen)
    No, but a lot of the A level content could be transferred to the GCSE to make it better.
    Will this help you feel better and reinforce your opinion?
    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=2698718
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    NO.
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    (Original post by German123)
    Will this help you feel better and reinforce your opinion?
    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=2698718
    I like what my skim reading tells me!
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    (Original post by felamaslen)
    I like what my skim reading tells me!
    No! that is not the attitude i wanna hear unfortunately. Anyway that does not affect me but still.
 
 
 
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