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    (Original post by felamaslen)
    Is this better: mathematics is necessary, I'm right, you're wrong.
    Jesus Christ, get a room you two!.

    Maths is important, I totally agree, but should we have people dwell into more advanced fields?, Calculus is only going to help certain career paths, and isn't really that important in everyday life. you could argue that no maths is, I disagree.

    However, kids should understand the basic principles of geometry and algebra, at a bare minimum. but going into really advanced stuff might not help as much.
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    Actually that's a point, if we are going to scrap large parts of the content in Maths we can also scrap English Literature.


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    (Original post by XI Ki11JoY IX)
    Jesus Christ, get a room you two!.

    Maths is important, I totally agree, but should we have people dwell into more advanced fields?, Calculus is only going to help certain career paths, and isn't really that important in everyday life. you could argue that no maths is, I disagree.

    However, kids should understand the basic principles of geometry and algebra, at a bare minimum. but going into really advanced stuff might not help as much.
    I agree with this. So one question to ask is whether we should make A-Level Maths a requirement to taking Physics, Economics and other subjects that depend heavily on mathematics. I don't have a view on this yet, what do you guys think?
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    Should Maths A-level be COMPULSORY? No.
    Not everyone is the same and nor should they be. You only use basic maths at work anyway. And calculators are everywhere.
    End of thread.
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    Firstly, no that would be the most stupid idea ever. Maths isn't for everyone, nor is it needed for everyone at an A level standard.

    Secondly, please correct me if I'm wrong but skimming that article it doesn't say they want A level maths to be compulsory. It says they want people in post 16 education to be doing maths. Now that could be going over GCSE maths, or doing a new course that perhaps is real world maths but it doesn't state A level maths. Still not a great idea. If this was implemented then English language would have to have the same treatment. Then you would get people arguing for the sciences, languages, ICT etc. and before you know it you are not choosing your subjects at all and have no time to do A levels.
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    (Original post by German123)
    I did not actually state it is not necessary but only stated that trigonometry and sims equations are not that beneficial as basic maths and percentages is needed in the real world.
    Only if the "real world" is sitting idly reading "A Picture of Dorian Gray" or something. (Not that Oscar Wilde isn't a brilliant author.)
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    (Original post by felamaslen)
    Only if the "real world" is sitting idly reading "A Picture of Dorian Gray" or something. (Not that Oscar Wilde isn't a brilliant author.)
    Relax.
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    (Original post by XI Ki11JoY IX)
    Jesus Christ, get a room you two!.

    Maths is important, I totally agree, but should we have people dwell into more advanced fields?, Calculus is only going to help certain career paths, and isn't really that important in everyday life. you could argue that no maths is, I disagree.

    However, kids should understand the basic principles of geometry and algebra, at a bare minimum. but going into really advanced stuff might not help as much.
    I wouldn't call knowing how to find a gradient "really advanced stuff".
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    (Original post by XI Ki11JoY IX)
    Jesus Christ, get a room you two!.

    Maths is important, I totally agree, but should we have people dwell into more advanced fields?, Calculus is only going to help certain career paths, and isn't really that important in everyday life. you could argue that no maths is, I disagree.

    However, kids should understand the basic principles of geometry and algebra, at a bare minimum. but going into really advanced stuff might not help as much.

    Exactly may thoughts in a way!
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    (Original post by German123)
    Not necessarily as there are people who know basic maths but may have failed their GCSE maths. I cant think of at least one person from school.
    Failing a GCSE in maths means that you cannot answer ~6% of a higher paper (you need 12 out of 200 for a E, source: http://www.sthn.co.uk/wp-content/upl...aries-2013.pdf). Anything from an A*-G is a pass.

    I'm guessing you mean lower than a C though. In which case your friend from school may be able to do basic maths just fine but that is not necessarily representative of all people. There is a lot of complicated maths behind things like interest rates for loans and working out if you have under/overpaid your electricity bill and if you have not got a good grade at GCSE maths then you will most likely struggle with such things, which could have huge repercussions for your life.
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    (Original post by felamaslen)
    I wouldn't call knowing how to find a gradient "really advanced stuff".
    I learnt how to find the equation of a line back at GCSE, in fact i laughed when it appeared on the A level syllabus.
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    (Original post by XI Ki11JoY IX)
    I learnt how to find the equation of a line back at GCSE, in fact i laughed when it appeared on the A level syllabus.
    Well exactly - a lot of the stuff in the first year of A level should be taught to all GCSE maths students.
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    A levels themselves shouldn't be compulsory, let alone making a specific subject a requirement for all youngsters.

    There are a huge amount of people who would be far better off stopping traditional education at 16 and going in to apprenticeships or some form of practical work instead of being made to spend two more years in school where they are either not going to work or not really get anything out of it even if they do work.
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    Although I do maths, further maths and additional further maths,
    I'd say no.
    Simple because I cannot imagine doing an A-level in English... Suicide.
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    Why are we discussing an article from the Guardian from July 2012?

    A more useful discussion would focus on the proposals for a Core Maths qualification:
    https://www.gov.uk/government/news/l...qualifications
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    (Original post by felamaslen)
    Er... all of science and technology and engineering?
    To be fair, in much of engineering very little advanced maths is typically used on the job. I'm not convinced that it's a good enough use of everyone's time for it to be compulsory.
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    (Original post by felamaslen)
    Well then they need to try harder.
    You know, since you're supposedly a teacher, you don't seem like the most... patient and understanding of people, qualities that are pretty much vital for that area of work. You actually make me so grateful that my maths teacher was hugely empathetic and considerate!

    In other words, not everyone like Maths to the extent that you do and not everyone sees all the topics in GCSE maths are essential for surviving independently. I sure as heck didn't (Some were though I'll admit but I still fail to see the relevance of half of the topics) and I could not imagine anything worse than having to do a Maths A level, for why would anyone even consider doing something they know they were going to drastically fail in, no matter how much energy and effort they put in to try and prevent that result. It would be hugely anti-motivational and barely anyone would try anyway for they would focus on the subjects that they are heavily interested in and have a talent for. I believe they should instead be encouraging this; pursuing subjects that you naturally excel in and enjoy.

    But if there is a very prevalent and urgent issue then tackle it at GCSE level and below where it is compulsory and mandatory, like they seem to have done.
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    (Original post by Smack)
    To be fair, in much of engineering very little advanced maths is typically used on the job. I'm not convinced that it's a good enough use of everyone's time for it to be compulsory.
    Perhaps, but I'm biased.
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    (Original post by CCH0705)
    You know, since you're supposedly a teacher, you don't seem like the most... patient and understanding of people, qualities that are pretty much vital for that area of work. You actually make me so grateful that my maths teacher was hugely empathetic and considerate!

    In other words, not everyone like Maths to the extent that you do and not everyone sees all the topics in GCSE maths are essential for surviving independently. I sure as heck didn't (Some were though I'll admit but I still fail to see the relevance of half of the topics) and I could not imagine anything worse than having to do a Maths A level, for why would anyone even consider doing something they know they were going to drastically fail in, no matter how much energy and effort they put in to try and prevent that result. It would be hugely anti-motivational and barely anyone would try anyway for they would focus on the subjects that they are heavily interested in and have a talent for. I believe they should instead be encouraging this; pursuing subjects that you naturally excel in and enjoy.

    But if there is a very prevalent and urgent issue then tackle it at GCSE level and below where it is compulsory and mandatory, like they seem to have done.
    I don't think I claimed I was a teacher, did I? For what it's worth, you are correct - I'd be a terrible teacher.

    But I do think that the level of maths expected of people in this country is too low. It is an undervalued subject here, in comparison to countries like South Korea and China. (Though in other, more important respects, I much prefer the UK to China).
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    (Original post by felamaslen)
    I don't think I claimed I was a teacher, did I? For what it's worth, you are correct - I'd be a terrible teacher.

    But I do think that the level of maths expected of people in this country is too low. It is an undervalued subject here, in comparison to countries like South Korea and China. (Though in other, more important respects, I much prefer the UK to China).
    Oh cr*p it was a misquote, I'm so so sorry!

    I don't think we'll ever achieve that level though. But isn't it a very popular A level now?
 
 
 
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