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    (Original post by Guren)
    Should Maths A-level be COMPULSORY? No.
    Not everyone is the same and nor should they be. You only use basic maths at work anyway. And calculators are everywhere.
    End of thread.
    Calculators don't do maths.
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    (Original post by CCH0705)
    Oh cr*p it was a misquote, I'm so so sorry!

    I don't think we'll ever achieve that level though. But isn't it a very popular A level now?
    It is a popular A level, which is a good thing (in my absolutely correct opinion). And I think I agree that moving *everything* in the A level into the "compulsory" zone would be excessive, but I do also think (or at least suspect) that if we expected a better ability in maths to begin with (starting from an early age, in fact), people would be more interested in it, and hence reach more of their potential in it. I suppose what I'm trying to say is that we could be much better at maths, as a nation, if we tried harder.
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    (Original post by felamaslen)
    It is a popular A level, which is a good thing (in my absolutely correct opinion). And I think I agree that moving *everything* in the A level into the "compulsory" zone would be excessive, but I do also think (or at least suspect) that if we expected a better ability in maths to begin with (starting from an early age, in fact), people would be more interested in it, and hence reach more of their potential in it. I suppose what I'm trying to say is that we could be much better at maths, as a nation, if we tried harder.
    Yeah I agree, it's much easier to enjoy something if you know you're good at it and therefore taking action at primary level could massively boost both performance and interest in Maths. I never understand why they don't take action lower down the years instead of constantly applying more and more pressure onto teenagers
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    (Original post by MrJAKEE)
    Personally I think yes it should, but the whole maths curriculum throughout school needs to be more rigorous. While I was doing simultaneous equations in Year 7, some children at schools were doing them in Year 10, so I would love to know what people do in state schools during the years 5-10 in maths classes.


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    I remember doing simultaneous equations in year 8. Tbh I can't even remember what I did during the years 5-10 awks, but probably just the basics of the GCSE topics.
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    I don't think Maths should be compulsory at all. Some of the stuff in the full mathematics A-level has no day to day use unless you want to do something technical. I'd very much like to know when anybody would do implicit differentiation when they're out grocery shopping. If it were to be made compulsory I'd want it to be a use of maths AS over the 2 years.
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    (Original post by XI Ki11JoY IX)
    I take maths A level, and even the smart kids get B's. My AS class had about 24 people when we started the year, come A2 that number has dropped to about 10, the 10 people in that class got A* at GCSE, and even then we scraped B's.

    To the point: If maths A level is to be compulsory, then they have to do a ton of work to the GCSE syllabus, otherwise everyone who takes it is going to come out with a U.
    No the smart kids get good A grades with good UMS at any good college if noone in your classes gets an A grade this indicates very poor teaching, about 40% get an A nationally-this suggests the teacher only taught up to grade B to me.It is very sad that your maths teacher was poor.

    As a general rule the smart kids in any class should always get As(probably A*s really) that's how A Levels are designed.
    Although, the Physics department in my college isn't very good with noone getting an A* last year showing incompetence.
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    (Original post by MrJAKEE)
    Personally I think yes it should, but the whole maths curriculum throughout school needs to be more rigorous. While I was doing simultaneous equations in Year 7, some children at schools were doing them in Year 10, so I would love to know what people do in state schools during the years 5-10 in maths classes.


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    What type of simultaneous equations did you do in Year 7 they can vary a lot in difficulty from B-A* at GCSE and even in A Level(Cambridge love introducing solid ones into their entrance exams for Maths).In my school in Year 7 you solved basic algebra balancing things on either side of an equation eg. 6x+7=2x-4 etc. before Secondary I don't think I had really done any algebra other than boxes representing missing values.
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    I do not support compulsury subjects but I see too many people complaining that it will be a nightmare to do more maths and that many people just can't do it.. In many countries it is compulsury and is equivalent to A levels and everyone seems to cope quite well without particular difficulties so many people here claim that they would have. Surely abilities of people in the UK are not different..
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    (Original post by Dalek1099)
    What type of simultaneous equations did you do in Year 7 they can vary a lot in difficulty from B-A* at GCSE and even in A Level(Cambridge love introducing solid ones into their entrance exams for Maths).In my school in Year 7 you solved basic algebra balancing things on either side of an equation eg. 6x+7=2x-4 etc. before Secondary I don't think I had really done any algebra other than boxes representing missing values.
    ***** plz i was doing Fourier transforms before I was born 😉


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    (Original post by tiny hobbit)
    Why are we discussing an article from the Guardian from July 2012?

    A more useful discussion would focus on the proposals for a Core Maths qualification:
    https://www.gov.uk/government/news/l...qualifications
    Bumping this up, as noone seems to have read it.
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    (Original post by felamaslen)
    Perhaps, but I'm biased.
    That much is obvious, but the reality is that there are vanishingly few people who are going to make use of A-level maths material throughout their careers. There is a strong case to be made that poor basic maths skills holds people back in their careers and damages the economy, but I'm not sure that lack of advanced maths skills has the same effect.
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    (Original post by felamaslen)
    Well exactly - a lot of the stuff in the first year of A level should be taught to all GCSE maths students.
    But then you have to include everything, and I don't think people who are "Okay" at maths are going to want to do most of the stuff, would you want to do arithmetic and geometric series if you wanted to be a doctor?
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    (Original post by XI Ki11JoY IX)
    But then you have to include everything, and I don't think people who are "Okay" at maths are going to want to do most of the stuff, would you want to do arithmetic and geometric series if you wanted to be a doctor?
    Yes.
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    (Original post by Smack)
    That much is obvious, but the reality is that there are vanishingly few people who are going to make use of A-level maths material throughout their careers. There is a strong case to be made that poor basic maths skills holds people back in their careers and damages the economy, but I'm not sure that lack of advanced maths skills has the same effect.
    I would call a lot of the stuff in the first year of A level "basic". By the way, remember that I'm not advocating making the A level compulsory - only transferring some of the more basic A level content to GCSE level.
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    (Original post by sophie kwon chu)
    I remember doing simultaneous equations in year 8. Tbh I can't even remember what I did during the years 5-10 awks, but probably just the basics of the GCSE topics.
    Yeah I think it was, nevertheless I think if I was personally pushed (and some of my friends) we could have got the A* in maths gcse at the end of year 9 / mid year 10, perhaps those years are confidence boosting years?


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    Just because the content of A-Level Maths is largely irrelevant to the vast majority of jobs/careers, it doesn't mean it's not useful to most people. The vast majority of maths graduates make no use of their degree when they start work, and weren't employed because of what they specifically learnt on their degree - but rather because someone good at maths tends to do very well in a lot of jobs. That said, A-Level Maths shouldn't be compulsory, instead education in this country needs to catch up and a significant portion of A-Level Maths should be taught at GCSE level.
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    (Original post by Dalek1099)
    What type of simultaneous equations did you do in Year 7 they can vary a lot in difficulty from B-A* at GCSE and even in A Level(Cambridge love introducing solid ones into their entrance exams for Maths).In my school in Year 7 you solved basic algebra balancing things on either side of an equation eg. 6x+7=2x-4 etc. before Secondary I don't think I had really done any algebra other than boxes representing missing values.
    They were the type say :

    2X + Y = 8
    X+3Y = 9 ones. I'd say probably B grade type questions in the gcse I took. I started my algebra back in year 5 with basic algebra and in year 6 I think did the balancing ones? I don't know for sure it was such a long time back :} I think it's serious how there is a two year gap at this stage in education, I went to a private school and I know several state schools which don't do algebra until year 8... It's far too late in my opinion. People moan about people from state schools only counting for around 50% of the intake of undergrads at Oxbridge despite the pupils making up 92%, but with gaps like these in education it makes it difficult for state school pupils to compete for places seeing as Oxbridge (maths in particular!) want the best and can cope.. Yes there are some people who get in but it makes it less likely.

    On a side note I'd say Maths is a great way of reducing social inequality. It's greatly accessible (especially with the current resources on the web) and I've seen many articles claim people with further maths as an a level have a good chance of getting paid a bit more in a profession than people who don't. For this reason I find it an absolute outrage how some schools don't offer Further Maths as an A level.


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    (Original post by felamaslen)
    I would call a lot of the stuff in the first year of A level "basic". By the way, remember that I'm not advocating making the A level compulsory - only transferring some of the more basic A level content to GCSE level.
    Perhaps more applied content from say, M1,S1 & D1 along with C1 and some C2 content?

    I think there should be an option to take different modules in year 11 based on what the student wants. For instance there could be modules based around Business, Stats, Mechanics, Computing ? I think by allowing students to choose what they want to do maths wise maths can become useful for them. This obviously would have to be with some strong core content (including integration, sequences).




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