Join TSR now and get all your revision questions answeredSign up now
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by MrJAKEE)
    Perhaps more applied content from say, M1,S1 & D1 along with C1 and some C2 content?

    I think there should be an option to take different modules in year 11 based on what the student wants. For instance there could be modules based around Business, Stats, Mechanics, Computing ? I think by allowing students to choose what they want to do maths wise maths can become useful for them. This obviously would have to be with some strong core content (including integration, sequences).




    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Sounds about right!

    Maybe leave the non-core modules as optionals. A lot of people seem to despise mechanics (though I love it!).
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by felamaslen)
    Sounds about right!

    Maybe leave the non-core modules as optionals. A lot of people seem to despise mechanics (though I love it!).
    The A level would probably have to be revamped again to provide adequate content for sixth formers tbh.

    I have to say I am one of them haha I'm starting m2 next term though haha so should be interesting :} it's weird tbh I'm usually quick at learning the core stuff but with mechanics it takes me ages..


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by MrJAKEE)
    I have to say I am one of them haha I'm starting m2 next term though haha so should be interesting :} it's weird tbh I'm usually quick at learning the core stuff but with mechanics it takes me ages..


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Yup, it's a certain mindset.
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by felamaslen)
    I would call a lot of the stuff in the first year of A level "basic".
    As a student of maths, your opinion is likely to somewhat different from non-maths students.

    By the way, remember that I'm not advocating making the A level compulsory - only transferring some of the more basic A level content to GCSE level.
    That's a good idea for those that would like a more rigorous qualification that will better prepare them for further study in maths or another subject that heavily utilises maths. However I believe there should also be an element of choice too, so that those who are not mathematically inclined can still take the subject without failing.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Smack)
    As a student of maths, your opinion is likely to somewhat different from non-maths students.
    Agreed. You should therefore take my opinion for what it is worth: not much.

    That's a good idea for those that would like a more rigorous qualification that will better prepare them for further study in maths or another subject that heavily utilises maths. However I believe there should also be an element of choice too, so that those who are not mathematically inclined can still take the subject without failing.
    I would say that doing maths non-rigorously is a bit like doing painting non-artistically.
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    Definitely not.
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by lolololol)
    Failing a GCSE in maths means that you cannot answer ~6% of a higher paper (you need 12 out of 200 for a E, source: http://www.sthn.co.uk/wp-content/upl...aries-2013.pdf). Anything from an A*-G is a pass.

    I'm guessing you mean lower than a C though. In which case your friend from school may be able to do basic maths just fine but that is not necessarily representative of all people. There is a lot of complicated maths behind things like interest rates for loans and working out if you have under/overpaid your electricity bill and if you have not got a good grade at GCSE maths then you will most likely struggle with such things, which could have huge repercussions for your life.
    I guess so but the person i am talking about was in the lowest maths set in my school and constantly struggled with the basic. To be fair on her though she is maths dyslexic and her maths teacher knew about that but what could she have done? Not much i guess. The funniest thing is that 2 days before her maths exam she told me she is not going to revise but take a break. That was so bad of her but i did sort of understand her feeling because being dyslexic in maths can mean a lot.

    Edit: GCSE maths was fairly okayish but i must say some things were hard like cicle theorems. Anyway i do not really see the reason of someone failling even the foundation paper.
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by lolololol)
    Failing a GCSE in maths means that you cannot answer ~6% of a higher paper (you need 12 out of 200 for a E, source: http://www.sthn.co.uk/wp-content/upl...aries-2013.pdf). Anything from an A*-G is a pass.

    I'm guessing you mean lower than a C though. In which case your friend from school may be able to do basic maths just fine but that is not necessarily representative of all people. There is a lot of complicated maths behind things like interest rates for loans and working out if you have under/overpaid your electricity bill and if you have not got a good grade at GCSE maths then you will most likely struggle with such things, which could have huge repercussions for your life.
    You should look at this thread:
    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...3#post52589913
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    Why does the OP feel the need to write 'compulsory' in capitals? Is the OP a 'reporter' from the Daily Mail?
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    I'm thinking, screw this government trying to force everyone into a career in STEM. If they continue in this way we'll end up a populations averagely inadequate at maths who don't know what a novel is.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by katinthehat)
    I'm thinking, screw this government trying to force everyone into a career in STEM. If they continue in this way we'll end up a populations averagely inadequate at maths who don't know what a novel is.
    In what possible context is knowing connotations and the meaning of alliteration in a novel of any use?


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by katinthehat)
    I'm thinking, screw this government trying to force everyone into a career in STEM. If they continue in this way we'll end up a populations averagely inadequate at maths who don't know what a novel is.
    English Literature & English Language should be scrapped into one single English gcse IMO.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by langlitz)
    In what possible context is knowing connotations and the meaning of alliteration in a novel of any use?


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    To understand the constructions of texts, why people made these decisions and how this reflects on the society at the time perhaps? Psychological and sociological influences upon texts give us insight into the history of literature, and not only literature but of mankind itself?

    Anyway, enough of all that useless garbage! I'll get back to finding 'x' :rolleyes:
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by MrJAKEE)
    English Literature & English Language should be scrapped into one single English gcse IMO.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Do you have any factual basis for that opinion?
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by katinthehat)
    Do you have any factual basis for that opinion?
    When I say "scrapped into one gcse" I mean a more rigorous gcse but with obviously less content than the two single GCSES.

    When I took Language, for my coursework I had to do a story, a descriptive piece and I think that was it. We took a paper that was do or die, we were given a text and we were asked to write of questions based off it. Sounds too similar to Literature to me. Literature I feel isn't as needed as language, why should I bother to learn Shakespeare when a lot of the concepts are common sense? I'll never understand why English currently is given 2 GCSES whereas maths is only given 1.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by MrJAKEE)
    When I say "scrapped into one gcse" I mean a more rigorous gcse but with obviously less content than the two single GCSES.

    When I took Language, for my coursework I had to do a story, a descriptive piece and I think that was it. We took a paper that was do or die, we were given a text and we were asked to write of questions based off it. Sounds too similar to Literature to me. Literature I feel isn't as needed as language, why should I bother to learn Shakespeare when a lot of the concepts are common sense? I'll never understand why English currently is given 2 GCSES whereas maths is only given 1.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Well I can understand that, however, language is much more factual and based on the technicality in language whereas literature is much more focused on contextual and thematic factors. So they do explore two different types of learning. Honestly, I can't really talk about maths as I scraped a B in my GCSE and then abandoned it. However, I know I hated almost every minute of it, and sit through 2 compulsory units of it may have been more than I could have handled. It's so dry. I guess it's personal preference.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by katinthehat)
    To understand the constructions of texts, why people made these decisions and how this reflects on the society at the time perhaps? Psychological and sociological influences upon texts give us insight into the history of literature, and not only literature but of mankind itself?

    Anyway, enough of all that useless garbage! I'll get back to finding 'x' :rolleyes:
    Oh great.. Which is useful how?

    If that's the limit of your maths education I seriously feel bad for you. You cut yourself of from pretty much every subject apart from humanities without maths. The world would simple grind to a halt without maths. No computers, no economy


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    No it shouldn't.
    However if it were to become compulsory the level of it should be lower, just for the purpose of keeping maths skill up from GCSE rather than doing anything much more complicated. If a student chooses to take A level/AS maths then the difficulty should be the same as what it is now.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by katinthehat)
    Well I can understand that, however, language is much more factual and based on the technicality in language whereas literature is much more focused on contextual and thematic factors. So they do explore two different types of learning. Honestly, I can't really talk about maths as I scraped a B in my GCSE and then abandoned it. However, I know I hated almost every minute of it, and sit through 2 compulsory units of it may have been more than I could have handled. It's so dry. I guess it's personal preference.
    Lol I got an A in my language and it seemed to be that it was always so random as to what I got in the mocks.. Sometimes an A* .. Sometimes a B .. Sometimes a D.. You had to answer the questions in such an ordered manner and tbh I don't see the relevance to real life. Obviously this can be said so in Maths too, which I'd like to see reformed to more everyday/useful maths. I did like English Lit but I do question how much we need to be teaching our children about contextual/thematic factors.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by MrJAKEE)
    When I say "scrapped into one gcse" I mean a more rigorous gcse but with obviously less content than the two single GCSES.

    When I took Language, for my coursework I had to do a story, a descriptive piece and I think that was it. We took a paper that was do or die, we were given a text and we were asked to write of questions based off it. Sounds too similar to Literature to me. Literature I feel isn't as needed as language, why should I bother to learn Shakespeare when a lot of the concepts are common sense? I'll never understand why English currently is given 2 GCSES whereas maths is only given 1.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    The thing is English first language GCSE/IGCSE now is considered as a proof for English proficiency for 2nd language speakers. English literature doesn't prove one's English skill, as a first language person with fine English grammar can get bad grade in it. By combining it destroys the purpose of proving one's English proficiency. (Not gonna have a debate about whether or not GCSE English language is a good indicator of one's English proficiency, because I don't know lol)
 
 
 
Poll
Which Fantasy Franchise is the best?
Help with your A-levels

All the essentials

The adventure begins mug

Student life: what to expect

What it's really like going to uni

Rosette

Essay expert

Learn to write like a pro with our ultimate essay guide.

Uni match

Uni match

Our tool will help you find the perfect course for you

Study planner

Create a study plan

Get your head around what you need to do and when with the study planner tool.

Study planner

Resources by subject

Everything from mind maps to class notes.

Hands typing

Degrees without fees

Discover more about degree-level apprenticeships.

A student doing homework

Study tips from A* students

Students who got top grades in their A-levels share their secrets

Study help links and info

Can you help? Study help unanswered threadsRules and posting guidelines

Sponsored content:

HEAR

HEAR

Find out how a Higher Education Achievement Report can help you prove your achievements.

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Quick reply
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.