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    Hello everyone!

    After doing a mountain of research into applications, unis and SLT itself, I have decided to apply in 2015 for 2016 (Gosh, that seems so far!!). My only concern is the experience that I have so far. What type of experience does everyone else have and has this helped you get a place? (If you have already applied). It is a question which I can't seem to find much of an answer to online.

    After speaking with some SLT students they have all pretty much said the same thing... "you never feel you have enough".

    So, what do you think?
    Congrats to those who have had offers already!

    EDIT: I should also add that I am looking specifically at Masters degrees and not Undergraduate ones. I currently have a degree in English Language and Linguistics.
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    I will also be applying for 2016 entry, if I'm able to save enough money by then. It will be a bit tight as my PhD is only due to finish in autumn 2016, but this gives me an incentive to get the thesis in on time and arrange an early viva!

    My current experience is two years as a full-time support worker in a residential school for teenagers with learning disabilities (ranging from MLD to PMLD), a year as a bank healthcare assistant in an adult psychiatric unit (acute crisis admissions and a dementia ward), PhD research involving storytelling and narrative work with traumatised children, setting up a support group for teenagers with dyspraxia, writing a book for teenagers with neurodevelopmental disorders, delivering teacher training on the topic, and volunteering as a reading helper in a mainstream school for young kids who are having reading difficulties. When my PhD fieldwork is over I am hoping to do more part-time work in the psychiatric hospital.

    I'm a bit apprehensive about listing my experience, for reasons I wrote in another thread - I've seen people get very panicked about not having enough, when I know from working alongside speech and language therapists that the quantity and variety are not the relevant things. What you've learnt from it is. I've seen people with lots of experience get rejections because they just wrote a big shopping list of all the client groups they've worked with and all the AAC they've used, but they didn't say anything about what this has taught them or how it has prepared them for the course. One of my closest friends is a SLT and she got on the Newcastle postgraduate course with a previous degree in French and no other experience than support work with people who have LD, so you don't need a huge variety of experience providing you can demonstrate a good understanding of the profession and the right attributes for training.

    Good luck, and who knows, maybe we will be classmates in 2016.
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    Hey!

    That's really great and really helpful for me, thank you!

    I have a degree in English Language and Linguistics and have been teaching English as a Foreign Language for around 2-3 years. I only just graduated this year. My brother has aspergers syndrome and underwent SLT when he was younger. I also au paired with a family where the child saw a logopedia (SLT) and had difficulty with making some sounds. I will be starting a new job in a care home as well soon just working as a Care Assistant. I am hoping this will be enough. I am sure my enthusiasm will show in interviews if I get the opprtunity to do so

    Where are you from?
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    I'm from Lancashire. I'm planning to apply for the MSc at Sheffield, Reading, Newcastle, and Essex - I'm steering clear of London as the living costs would be astronomical and whenever I spend a weekend down there I can't wait to get out again! I am also going to apply for two undergraduate courses, as they're less competitive than postgrad. Some are three years rather than four, in any case - one extra year wouldn't be so bad.
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    Yes, I considered applying to undergraduate courses as well but I just don't want to go through UCAS for a THIRD TIME. I will see how it goes, if I get rejected then I will ask what is needed to improve. Sometimes they offer places for BSc courses for those who didn't quite make the MSc. I don't know of many places doing that though.
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    (Original post by Emmargh)
    Yes, I considered applying to undergraduate courses as well but I just don't want to go through UCAS for a THIRD TIME. I will see how it goes, if I get rejected then I will ask what is needed to improve. Sometimes they offer places for BSc courses for those who didn't quite make the MSc. I don't know of many places doing that though.
    I have never heard of a university offering a place on an undergraduate course for a rejected master's applicant. It makes little sense when you think about it. Courses will most likely have different admissions selectors, and undergraduate and postgraduate students tend to take classes together so it is not like the teaching is different. A rejection from the postgraduate course merely reflects the fact applicants are at a different stage in their career and there are fewer places so it is statistically more competitive. It is not like they are qualitatively better applicants; this is evidenced by the fact there are plenty of people with degrees who choose to do the undergraduate route.

    In fact, I personally know someone who applied for both undergraduate and postgraduate courses at my university last year. She was accepted by the postgraduate course and rejected by the undergraduate course.
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    (Original post by evantej)
    I have never heard of a university offering a place on an undergraduate course for a rejected master's applicant. It makes little sense when you think about it. Courses will most likely have different admissions selectors, and undergraduate and postgraduate students tend to take classes together so it is not like the teaching is different. A rejection from the postgraduate course merely reflects the fact applicants are at a different stage in their career and there are fewer places so it is statistically more competitive. It is not like they are qualitatively better applicants; this is evidenced by the fact there are plenty of people with degrees who choose to do the undergraduate route.

    In fact, I personally know someone who applied for both undergraduate and postgraduate courses at my university last year. She was accepted by the postgraduate course and rejected by the undergraduate course.
    I'm sorry! You have misunderstood me and reading back I can see how my message came across. I use my phone for TSR and often the words just come out and I don't think properly! :mmm:

    Anyway, yes, I have known people to apply for both the BSc and the MSc and get offers on the UG and not the PG course (and the PG but not the UG). I just personally couldn't face UCAS and studying for another four years when I can do it intensively for 2. I have heard that they ask how we would cope under the pressure from such an intensive course in the interview. I do not think anything will be more intensive than CELTA. Four weeks of hell. Three people broke down during that time.
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    (Original post by Emmargh)
    I'm sorry! You have misunderstood me and reading back I can see how my message came across. I use my phone for TSR and often the words just come out and I don't think properly! :mmm:

    Anyway, yes, I have known people to apply for both the BSc and the MSc and get offers on the UG and not the PG course (and the PG but not the UG). I just personally couldn't face UCAS and studying for another four years when I can do it intensively for 2. I have heard that they ask how we would cope under the pressure from such an intensive course in the interview. I do not think anything will be more intensive than CELTA. Four weeks of hell. Three people broke down during that time.
    Fair enough. But would you really want to do the equivalent of a CELTA for two years straight?

    I have done an undergraduate and master's degree before. I felt the hours involved in my master's degree were very antisocial, especially if you wanted to do well, so I made a very conscious decision to go down the undergraduate route as it would give me a better work-life balance and more time to pursue my research interests. This has already paid off thankfully so I know I made the right choice.

    If you want to qualify as quickly as you can then the master's course is obviously the best option for you.
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    (Original post by evantej)
    If you want to qualify as quickly as you can then the master's course is obviously the best option for you.
    Then the MSc it is!!

    I HIGHLY doubt that the MSc will be anything near like how CELTA was. CELTA kills, I haven't seen anyone nearly die (metaphorically) or break down from doing the MSc in SALT. So far noone has complained about the extreme intensity of it in comparison to CELTA students.

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