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Graduated from a Russell Group university and still can't get a job? Watch

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    (Original post by Hollywood Hogan)
    It isn't me that needs the advice, as I have worked for several years. But I wanted the view of others who have recently graduated. I am looking at changing industries soon.
    Yes, whenever anyone posts a (general) question they always assume he/she in that situation or he/she is projecting lord knows how :rolleyes: Because curiosity and interesting subjects don't exist :rolleyes::rolleyes:

    I just wanted to say that (and I'm sure there must be people having trouble finding a job even in that situation)
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    (Original post by Fidus Achates)
    You will find the answers to most of your questions on here in more depth than I can put out on here.

    http://www.smallbusiness.co.uk


    This is going to entirely depend on the type of business you want to set up. What areas are you passionate about? Lets try and think up some ideas here and now. I'm more than willing to help.
    I have looked at setting up an online business. One of my colleagues from the past set up an online business selling toy models. It made some money but not enough to live on.
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    (Original post by Fidus Achates)
    1. Find a market you want to work in
    2. Put together a solid business plan
    3. Go to the banks and ask for a business loan
    4. Set up your own business

    Why do people routinely insist on slaving away for others to get rich? It's as if the young today in this country have no desire to go out and make things happen themselves. If you badly want something, stop making excuses and go and make it happen.
    Seriously? :rolleyes: I hate it when people use words devoid of meaning. Would you still suggest OP to jump off a bridge if you knew that 75% of the people that jump off a bridge die and only 25% of those who jump manage to make some good money of their story in a published book plus interviews on TV?
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    (Original post by Juichiro)
    Seriously? :rolleyes: I hate it when people use words devoid of meaning.
    The thing is, it does actually have a meaning. It's a pity that was lost on you.

    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/atta...d=349867&stc=1

    It's not a particularly difficult adjective to come to terms with.

    Would you still suggest OP to jump off a bridge if you knew that 75% of the people that jump off a bridge die and only 25% of those who jump manage to make some good money of their story in a published book plus interviews on TV?
    Every start up carries risk so what is your point?
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    (Original post by Hollywood Hogan)
    Stalker:eek:
    And... you're of course conveniently avoiding the question, as always.

    And stalker? Don't make me laugh. You're online all day long repeating "I was an undergrad at Nottingham and am now doing my post-grad at UCL" on every single university-related thread. Yet now you say you've been in the industry for "several years".

    So please do enlighten my interest. Are you able to reverse time and do both simultaneously or what?

    And, since you're apparently unaware of this, you can search one's history of posts from his profile. Just so you don't accuse people of being stalkers again.
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    (Original post by *Stefan*)
    And... you're of course conveniently avoiding the question, as always.

    And stalker? Don't make me laugh. You're online all day long repeating "I was an undergrad at Nottingham and am now doing my post-grad at UCL" on every single university-related thread. Yet now you say you've been in the industry for "several years".

    So please do enlighten my interest. Are you able to reverse time and do both simultaneously or what?

    And, since you're apparently unaware of this, you can search one's history of posts from his profile. Just so you don't accuse people of being stalkers again.
    Do you seriously think everyone does a masters straight out of their first degree?
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    (Original post by Fidus Achates)
    The thing is, it does actually have a meaning. It's a pity that was lost on you.

    solid
    ˈsɒlɪd/
    adjective
    [COLOR=#878787 !important]adjective: solid; comparative adjective: solider; superlative adjective: solides[/COLOR]

    • 4.
      dependable; reliable.
      [COLOR=#878787 !important]"the defence is solid"[/COLOR]




      • sound but without any special qualities or flair.
        [COLOR=#878787 !important]"the rest of the acting is solid"[/COLOR]










    Every start up carries risk so what is your point?
    Nice one. :rolleyes:

    But "reliable/dependable/[insert adjective here] business plan" is still an empty phrase. You make it sound straightforward when it isn't. Bank loans won't give a nobody a loan without some sort of guarantee that the money comes back to them. And even with the guarantee they might still not give it to you. Also, a very popular study was made on a pair of thousands new businesses and guess, what? After a couple of years most of them failed. Yes, failure is part and parcel of the business game but no one wants to fail after having taken a bank loan, Mr. Straightforward. :cool:

    Risk is extremely painful and when it hits you, it does it really hard. You shouldn't toss that word as if risk was just a minor consequence. If you take a loan and you fail, your credit score gets stained. There is no reset button.

    In the game of business-making, you win or you die. :cool:
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    (Original post by Fidus Achates)
    The thing is, it does actually have a meaning. It's a pity that was lost on you.

    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/atta...d=349867&stc=1

    It's not a particularly difficult adjective to come to terms with.


    Every start up carries risk so what is your point?
    You edited your post

    Unfortunately, the synonyms you attached are (apart from "logical") equally devoid of an actual meaning when it comes to the business of being crystal clear. But then, again, human languages have no say in the business of being extremely precise. Hence, mathematics. :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by Juichiro)
    Nice one. :rolleyes:

    But "reliable/dependable/[insert adjective here] business plan" is still an empty phrase. You make it sound straightforward when it isn't. Bank loans won't give a nobody a loan without some sort of guarantee that the money comes back to them. And even with the guarantee they might still not give it to you. Also, a very popular study was made on a pair of thousands new businesses and guess, what? After a couple of years most of them failed. Yes, failure is part and parcel of the business game but no one wants to fail after having taken a bank loan, Mr. Straightforward. :cool:

    Risk is extremely painful and when it hits you, it does it really hard. You shouldn't toss that word as if risk was just a minor consequence. If you take a loan and you fail, your credit score gets stained. There is no reset button.

    In the game of business-making, you win or you die. :cool:
    Can only gamble what you can afford to lose. Most people can't afford to lose anything at present.
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    (Original post by Juichiro)
    Nice one. :rolleyes:
    Firstly, it is not an empty phrase in the slightest. It is quite unequivocally clear that it means a business plan on a solid foundation with all things factored in, as you would do if you were laying the foundations ready to build a house. One only need look at the synonyms to see that is the case.

    As for the business side of things, I've been there and done it. I've ran my own business for over 2 years and it was a success. I've now graduated with around £7k in student loans worth of debt. Unless you have the business acumen I don't believe for a second you're in any position to tell anyone what is and what isn't the case.

    (Original post by Juichiro)
    In the game of business-making, you win or you die. :cool:
    And for crying out loud, leave out the cliched lines. I'm sure they're of great motivational use within the classroom environment but not in the real world of business.
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    I went to Edinburgh, I don't see any difference rate of employment than average amongst those I went to uni with.

    Yes, I think Edinburgh looks better of my CV than ... well most other unis in the world really but in terms of things that make me stand out I don't think it's high up the list. In reality, I think if you are borderline for getting shortlisted for interview then a better uni might tip the balance but it sure as hell won't get you a job
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    (Original post by Hollywood Hogan)
    Do you seriously think everyone does a masters straight out of their first degree?
    For others? Certainly not.

    You? I honestly don't believe anything of what you've said. You've contradicted yourself so many times in a single thread (even claiming to be studying two different subjects on some occasions) so... well... you get the notion.

    But whatever... I don't have the time for this. Continue with your university-rankings obsession pretending to be a person you're not.
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    (Original post by Fidus Achates)
    Firstly, it is not an empty phrase in the slightest. It is quite unequivocally clear that it means 1.a business plan on a solid foundation with all things factored in, as you would do if you were laying the foundations ready to build a house. One only need look at the synonyms to see that is the case.

    2. As for the business side of things, I've been there and done it. I've ran my own business for over 2 years and it was a success.
    I've now graduated with around £7k in student loans worth of debt. 3.Unless you have the business acumen I don't believe for a second you're in any position to tell anyone what is and what isn't the case.



    And for crying out loud, leave out the cliched lines. I'm sure they're of great motivational use within the classroom environment but not in the real world of business.
    1. You really aren't in the business of making things crystal clear. Phrase 1 is still highly ambiguous. How will OP know when he has ALL things factored in? What does exactly mean a "solid/reliable" foundation? :rolleyes:

    2. Good on you, that tells us nothing about your ability to write in a crystal clear manner. Richard Feynman was a famous teacher and a physicist. A big part of his fame is due to his ability to explain things in a crystal clear manner. The logical implication here is that just because you know x (where "x" can be any subject) it does not mean that you can explain/teach it to someone. You might be the Feynman of business (you are not :cool: ) but it says nothing about your ability to explain the starting business thing to OP in a crystal clear way.

    3. "If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it enough." Relatively good quote from old folk Albert. If Hawkings write a pop astrophysics book, I am entitled to give my opinion of it, regardless of whether or not I hold a PhD in astrophysics. Why? Because the book is intended to the public. Same here, if you write a plan to OP, I am entitled to give my opinion of it, regardless of whether or not my name is Krugman. You may have to reconsider your beliefs. Two very intelligent guys in the previous centuries came up with a mathematical way of doing it. You will get smarter!
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    (Original post by BKS)
    I went to Edinburgh, I don't see any difference rate of employment than average amongst those I went to uni with.

    Yes, I think Edinburgh looks better of my CV than ... well most other unis in the world really but in terms of things that make me stand out I don't think it's high up the list. In reality, I think if you are borderline for getting shortlisted for interview then a better uni might tip the balance but it sure as hell won't get you a job
    What are you doing careerwise, may I ask?
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    (Original post by Hollywood Hogan)
    What are you doing careerwise, may I ask?
    Non-chugger charity fundraising. I did do grants based but I'm currently training up on tendering for public sector contracts
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    (Original post by BKS)
    Non-chugger charity fundraising. I did do grants based but I'm currently training up on tendering for public sector contracts
    So no intern or year placement whilst at uni? What was your degree in? People in this position usually re-train to do something they might enjoy as a career?
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    (Original post by Hollywood Hogan)
    So no intern or year placement whilst at uni? What was your degree in? People in this position usually re-train to do something they might enjoy as a career?
    I did an internship in grants based fundraising after uni then did it as a officer level job for a bit. Then took a step down to a trainee officer level post in a different organisation, which is practically a 6 month internship with an almost certain officer level job at the end. Both internships were/are paid and a proper learning opportunity, not the BS sort.

    I worked all through uni, cause I couldn't afford not to. Primarily in youth work but with the odd bit of policy development and stuff like that. Plus extra work in bars and venues over the summer. So I had general sectoral knowledge and experience which combined well with my academic background to give a good base for fundraising.


    Degree in politics but a huge chunk of what I actually studies was other social sciences.


    Don't get your final question- do people in my type of role usually re-train eventually? No, not really.

    My switch in specialist area was because a good opportunity came up rather than any specific urge to leave grants based. Most fundraising roles in smaller charities require you to be able to do a few different types of fundraising so it will make me more employable long term to have experience in two areas.

    Overall, I love my job and plan to do it for the next 40-50 years. I think quite a few people do try it and quit quickly because it is a particular sort of job, you need to have a certain sort of geekiness. I think that's because you can get into it with almost any sort of background. But after that initial filtering, people who are into it stick to it.
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    It's not about graduating from a rg

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    (Original post by Fidus Achates)
    Previous business was in the construction industry. My next business will be in the software industry.
    What software are you creating? Sounds interesting. I share your entrepreneur views.
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    (Original post by holmes221)
    What software are you creating? Sounds interesting. I share your entrepreneur views.
    It's going to have a focus on education but be delivered online pretty much. Not going to go into it much more than that because I'd be giving away the USP. Good stuff. Do you run your own business? Shame so many on here are negative when it comes to entrepreneurialism and desire to work to ensure others become rich. I'd rather become rich myself.
 
 
 
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