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Nigel Farage named 'Briton of the year' by the Times Watch

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    (Original post by Ace123)
    I am very surprised by the decision not because Nigel does not deserve it because he does but because the Times have been very very critical of UKIP for years even having to pay Nigel damages in the past for made up stories. They are also staunch Tory supporters.

    Nigel does deserve love it or hate him 2014 was UKIP's year. The first time a party outside of Labour & the Tories won a national election for over a century is a historic achievement, breaking into Westminster particularly in the Rochester seat, getting hundreds more councillors & the big increase in membership. No other politician was going to win. LibLabCon have had terrile years all round & weren't even in the running & SNP had a disaster losing the referendum which they had been working towards for decades.
    News Corp's schtick is 'sue us if we're wrong', they're famous for publishing stuff on rumour and taking a gamble disclosure will force the other side to reveal info showing the allegation was true.

    Also, it backed Blair in 2001 and 2005, presumably before Rupert became aware he'd been banging Wendi.
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    Glad to see all the lefties getting annoyed.
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    Briton of the year. This is 2014, right? And not 1940?
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    (Original post by Ace123)
    I am very surprised by the decision not because Nigel does not deserve it because he does but because the Times have been very very critical of UKIP for years even having to pay Nigel damages in the past for made up stories. They are also staunch Tory supporters.

    Nigel does deserve love it or hate him 2014 was UKIP's year. The first time a party outside of Labour & the Tories won a national election for over a century is a historic achievement, breaking into Westminster particularly in the Rochester seat, getting hundreds more councillors & the big increase in membership. No other politician was going to win. LibLabCon have had terrile years all round & weren't even in the running & SNP had a disaster losing the referendum which they had been working towards for decades.
    Please explain this.
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    (Original post by lerjj)
    Please explain this.
    UKIP won the EU election which was the first time a party apart from Labour or the Tories won a UK wide election in over a century. Liberal Party won GE in 1910
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    I only agree with him on Europe as I'm pretty left wing but its obvious to see why. He's got everyone talking about subjects most people didn't want to bring up and we've also started to question the political establishment more. Farage has been one of the major cogs in pushing for change even if he has been trying to push it from the other side of the political spectrum. Given that The Times is right wing then this is no surprise.
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    (Original post by otester)
    Glad to see all the lefties getting annoyed.
    I'm a lefty and I'm not annoyed. Most of the people who are annoyed are Labour voters and they're right wingers, not lefties. Most lefties in fact, true lefties, will be appalled by the state of the current political situation within this country and will therefore welcome the fact that Nigel Farage has challenged it and brought attention to the problems, even if he is promoting the wrong solutions to those problems. The people who are upset are traditional Labour and Conservative voters who are upset that Nigel Farage's right wing party is cutting into their parties vote share.
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    Ha.

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    (Original post by Messiah Complex)
    I'm a lefty and I'm not annoyed. Most of the people who are annoyed are Labour voters and they're right wingers, not lefties. Most lefties in fact, true lefties, will be appalled by the state of the current political situation within this country and will therefore welcome the fact that Nigel Farage has challenged it and brought attention to the problems, even if he is promoting the wrong solutions to those problems. The people who are upset are traditional Labour and Conservative voters who are upset that Nigel Farage's right wing party is cutting into their parties vote share.
    I consider fascism to be a left wing ideology on the count that it meets the definition of socialism while maintaining a facade of private enterprise, and something we are on the way towards as the money tree is nearly dead.

    Also left wing ideologies always appall, they are utopian ideals that have no place in reality when combined with human nature.
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    (Original post by Messiah Complex)
    I'm a lefty and I'm not annoyed. Most of the people who are annoyed are Labour voters and they're right wingers, not lefties. Most lefties in fact, true lefties, will be appalled by the state of the current political situation within this country and will therefore welcome the fact that Nigel Farage has challenged it and brought attention to the problems, even if he is promoting the wrong solutions to those problems. The people who are upset are traditional Labour and Conservative voters who are upset that Nigel Farage's right wing party is cutting into their parties vote share.
    Can I suggest that at least some people who consider themselves true leftists don't see this is a compelling argument. It's good I suppose that Farage has drawn this much attention, but it's depressing how stupid some people can be. But he does deserve this- he's the most featured Briton in the newspapers and consistently has people talking about him.
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    (Original post by otester)
    Also left wing ideologies always appall, they are utopian ideals that have no place in reality when combined with human nature.
    I disagree. Socialism has never failed humanity. Humanity has always failed socialism. Socialism did not change. People did to serve their own interests.
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    (Original post by Messiah Complex)
    I disagree. Socialism has never failed humanity. Humanity has always failed socialism. Socialism did not change. People did to serve their own interests.
    Humanity fails all utopian ideas and always will, only ideas based around humanity (human nature) will work.
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    Is it the politician of the year in which I would suggest Gordon Brown since he saved the union or the person who has done something that is a vivid depiction of British values in which case I would say that 19 year old who died of cancer raising more the £5 million for charity, or the british nurse who went to west Africa to fight ebola who then went back after being cured of the virus
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    (Original post by Gott)
    I say he is the new Enoch Powell, only: far less intelligent, is a far less skilled politician, not a conservative and so forth
    Powell was frighteningly intelligent, so that's probably true, but was he a skilled politician? He repeatedly sabotaged his own career, the "Rivers of Blood" speech being the final nail he hammered into his own coffin. Farage on the other hand is already a somewhat powerful man in his own right and he's glided through dozens of scandals without any mud sticking.
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    (Original post by Observatory)
    Powell was frighteningly intelligent, so that's probably true, but was he a skilled politician? He repeatedly sabotaged his own career, the "Rivers of Blood" speech being the final nail he hammered into his own coffin. Farage on the other hand is already a somewhat powerful man in his own right and he's glided through dozens of scandals without any mud sticking.
    I meant skilled in the sense of being very articulate (which would help in politics) but the 'Rivers of Blood speech', I suspect was not made with a view to further his career and I would not be surprised if he meant it as a statement in its self and a resignation, seeing as he was so horrified at the situation then and saw himself to be vindicated up until his death, when he was unrepentant. His ultimate aim had been to be vice roi of India and so he may have seen such a statement to be more powerful, than would have been continuation as a politician, to mimic his previous ambitions of representing his ideology. I was under the impression that he may have become prime minister, in which case it would have been a misjudgement, seeing as the speech brought about his forced resignation (he definitely had ambitions to be PM)
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    (Original post by Gott)
    I meant skilled in the sense of being very articulate (which would help in politics) but the 'Rivers of Blood speech', I suspect was not made with a view to further his career and I would not be surprised if he meant it as a statement in its self and a resignation, seeing as he was so horrified at the situation then and saw himself to be vindicated up until his death, when he was unrepentant. His ultimate aim had been to be vice roi of India and so he may have seen such a statement to be more powerful, than would have been continuation as a politician, to mimic his previous ambitions of representing his ideology. I was under the impression that he may have become prime minister, in which case it would have been a misjudgement, seeing as the speech brought about his forced resignation (he definitely had ambitions to be PM)
    He was considered Prime Ministerial material (and was not a controversial figure, nor overly associated with race relations, as he is now), for about a decade. In fact Powell had been championing a lot of what would later become Thatcher's economic policies back in the 50s and 60s. He was ahead of his time and almost certainly right, but wasn't able to command a useful majority with those views at that time.

    Ultimately Powell was a somewhat otherworldly academic, a brilliant man, and a poor politician. I think he actually had little interest in being a politician. He made speech after speech pointing out that policies that had been engaged for the sake of expedience of because of inertia were shambolic and incoherent and would create problems for the future; he never realised - or tried hard not to realise - that the creation of such policies for the maximum possible short term gain is the job of a politician.
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    (Original post by Observatory)
    He was considered Prime Ministerial material (and was not a controversial figure, nor overly associated with race relations, as he is now), for about a decade. In fact Powell had been championing a lot of what would later become Thatcher's economic policies back in the 50s and 60s. He was ahead of his time and almost certainly right, but wasn't able to command a useful majority with those views at that time.

    Ultimately Powell was a somewhat otherworldly academic, a brilliant man, and a poor politician. I think he actually had little interest in being a politician. He made speech after speech pointing out that policies that had been engaged for the sake of expedience of because of inertia were shambolic and incoherent and would create problems for the future; he never realised - or tried hard not to realise - that the creation of such policies for the maximum possible short term gain is the job of a politician.
    I think it is hard to believe that he did not realise but wanted to make a martyr of himself for some reason when he had such an opportunity as becoming PM. I thought however that his position on immigration was well known, if not what he represented to all sides
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    (Original post by Reluire)
    Pretty spot on really. As much as many of us may dislike Farage, it's hard to dispute he was probably the biggest name in UK politics this year. I'm not sure if he was really Brit of the year though. It seems though that The Times haven't given it to him based solely on this year, but on his 'journey from the 2010 general election.' It's just that his 'journey' has peaked this year. He would never be my pick for Briton of the Year, but hey it's a pretty meaningless award anyway, based only on the opinion of a newspaper which just coincidentally has a right-wing ethos like Farage's. :rolleyes:
    The Times is more soft Tory than ultra conservative (Ukip) so its a bit of a broad brush to link the Times to Ukip.

    Not to mention that the Times is a quality establishment newspaper which would rarely support an anti-establishment party and so far as I'm aware holds no real fringe views.
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    (Original post by Gott)
    I think it is hard to believe that he did not realise but wanted to make a martyr of himself for some reason when he had such an opportunity as becoming PM. I thought however that his position on immigration was well known, if not what he represented to all sides
    I think he knew what he was doing but did it anyway, because speaking the truth as he saw it was more important to him. That's what made him a bad politician.

    Farage has some similar views - he would like to legalise all drugs for instance - but he keeps them hidden.
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    (Original post by Observatory)
    Powell was frighteningly intelligent, so that's probably true, but was he a skilled politician? He repeatedly sabotaged his own career, the "Rivers of Blood" speech being the final nail he hammered into his own coffin. Farage on the other hand is already a somewhat powerful man in his own right and he's glided through dozens of scandals without any mud sticking.
    I think your later point comes down to their aims and ambition.

    You (correctly I think) highlight in a further post that Powell by that point had no desire to achieve power, he was an insider who simply disagreed with policies of the day vehemently.

    On the other hand though Farage is able to effectively move through the weapons fired at him because he has chosen to be an outsider and has since either actively developed political ambition or sees gaining power from the outside as the only way to achieve his goal (I think its the former personally). By trading on an anti-establishment image he attracts voters who don't care about politically correctness and in many cases would sacrifice their own beliefs for an end to immigration.
 
 
 
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